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One of the best streetfighters that money can buy is set to get even better for next year, as the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 Factory is tipped to get semi-active suspension from Öhlins for 2019. 

The announcement is expected to occur at the INTERMOT show next week in Germany, according to the sleuths at GPone.

If true, the move is a strong update from Aprilia, as it helps the Italian brand keep the Tuono V4 1100  at the pointy end of the spectrum, especially from its closest competitor, the KTM 1290 Super Duke R.













Hello again from Austin, Texas and the Circuit of the Americas. Fresh off yesterday’s sessions on the 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000, we have another day of track riding ahead of us (it’s a tough life, I know).

Switching things up a bit, we will be on the Aprilia RSV4 RR, Aprilia RSV4 RF, Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, and Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 Factory. That’s a lot of bikes to ride in a single-day format, but we should be able to get some good seat time on each of the new Aprilia models for you.

Our focus for the day will be on the bevy of changes that Aprilia has brought to its V4 platform for the 2017 model year, as the Italian brand looks to continue the evolution of both its RSV4 and Tuono V4 lineups.







The big changes at hand are more power, an updated electronics package, new suspension pieces for the RSV4 RF and Tuono V4 1100 Factory, and upgraded brakes (cornering ABS from Bosch and larger brake discs) on all the models.







Piaggio Group Americas is recalling a bevy of models for a front brake master cylinder that may allow air in the hydraulic lines.

The recall affects 1,628 units of the 2014-2015 Aprilia Tuono V4 1000, 2016 Tuono V4 1100, 2015 Caponord 1200 ABS/ADD, and 2016 Caponord Rally motorcycles, which were manufactured June 18, 2013 to June 13, 2016.







Episode 7 of the Two Enthusiasts Podcast is locked and loaded, with both Jensen and Quentin back from their adventures in California and Texas, respectively.

The guys talk about the on-road differences between the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 Factory ABS and KTM 1290 Super Duke R, catch-up on the new models that debuted at the Tokyo Motor Show, and talk about the new water-cooled Triumph BonnevilleWe think you will enjoy this episode!

As always, you can listen to the show via the embedded SoundCloud player, after the jump, or you can find the show on iTunes (please leave a review) or this RSS feed. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well. Cheers!













Aprilia has the dubious distinction of having some of the most compelling motorcycles in its product lineup, which are mated to some of the worst market communications in the industry, but the Italian manufacturer certainly seems to be trying this year. Getting ready to launch the Aprilia Tuono V4 APRC in the US later this month, Aprilia is trying to expose more riders to the Italian brand and its racing heritage.

While we were less-than-impressed with the company’s more recent strategy of hiring motorcycle blogs to create online commercials for the brand, this latest media effort seems more genuine and original. Find after the jump an ever-so-trendy infographic on Aprilia’s racing heritage, APRC electronics system, and V4 engine, and RSV & Tuono motorcycles. Click on it for an even bigger version, it’s actually pretty interesting.







On paper the Aprilia Tuono V4 R is a monster, boasting the most horsepower in its class, and coming armed with a sophisticated electronics package to help hook-up the 162hp on the tarmac. While all the early ride reports are positive about the new true-blooded streetfighter, and we’re sure the slightly watered-down naked RSV4 would paint a silly grin on our face, it’s the headshot of this bike that makes us cringe just a little bit — the RSV4 headlight just doesn’t work without the accompanying bodywork.

While your mileage may vary, at least one dealership in France appears to agree with us, and has taken matters into its own hands. Putting together what it calls an Aprilia Tuono V4 Street, Paris-Nord Moto has created its own special version of the Aprilia Tuono V4 R with a new headlight and half-fairing design.







MotoRevue has sent their man Jérôme Vannesson into the bat cave to whip up another photoshop of what they expect a motorcycle to look like, and this time getting the treatment is the 2011 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory, in all its re-imagined glory.







We felt bad last week after we teased you with small, low-res photos of the new Aprilia Tuono V4, so we’re making it up to you this week. Italian magazine Motoclismo spotted the new Tuono lapping around Misano on what appears to be a track day event. If you have a halfway decent imagination, these pictures shouldn’t shock you. The new Tuono has many of the RSV4’s lines, and has little to no updates from our previous shots.







UPDATE 2: We now have clear photos of the 2011 Aprilia Tuono V4 lapping around Mugello, along with video footage of the bike. Check it out here.

UPDATE: Sorry folks, it looks like we’re one of the many sites that are being requested to remove the photos of the Tuono V4 at Mugello by the photographer. The camera phone photo remains though.

We’ve got more spy shots for you today, which should cover just about every bike Aprilia is rumored to have in development. One lucky photographer was at Mugello and caught both the upcoming Aprilia Tuono V4 & RSV4-R taking laps around the Italian course. We also found what looks like a camera phone picture of the Tuono V4 out in the wild.







While the RSV4 has gotten most of the limelight, the Tuono V4 has been content, as always, to be in the superbike’s shadow. Drawing from similar inspirations, there aren’t too many surprises on what the bike looks like. Imagine the RSV4 without its clothes on, with a new headlight, and you’ve about got it.







With specs for the road-going 2009 Aprilia RSV4 already out, and details about the WSBK prepped bike still coming, all has been too quiet on the Western Front in regards to if when the Aprilia Tuono will get the same V4 treatment as its more clothed cousin.

If Aprilia follows the previous formula for the Tuono, we can expect a literally naked version of the RSV4, in which case the above “rendered” speculation is likely a pretty close estimate, with maybe only some changes to the headlight, and “chin” fairing.

With already a plethora of naked bikes in its stable (Mana, Shiver, Dorsoduro) the Tuono can only exist if it differentiates itself from these bikes in some way (which would mean it has to adopt the V4 platform to continue on). Still, it would be nice to see Aprilia think a little bit outside of the box with the styling options. 







Instead of just dressing down an RSV4, maybe the Tuono would become more than just a small market bike if it had its own legs to stand on, without looking like the Emperor in new clothes.

Wow us Aprilia. Wow us.