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Jensen Beeler

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I’ve sat on this story for a few days now, trying to figure out what exactly is going on? Is Aprilia once again digging up the Gilera brand as a sportbike entry? Is this wishful thinking by an Italian designer known for “concept” sketches? Is this poor reporting by the motorcycle blogsphere? Or all of the above?

Let me start from the beginning, and in the end I’ll let you decide.

Carmelo Ezpeleta (Owner of Dorna Sports, which owns and runs MotoGP), has announced that the premiere motorcycle class of racing will take a cue from the Formula1 racebook, and limit the electronics that can be used while racing a GP motorcycle. This decision comes on the heels of the single tire move made by Dorna in an effort to make GP racing more exciting and evenly matched. 

Traction control for example has been of great concern, and to see why it only takes a brief glance at the latest reviews of the Ducati 1198S Superbike. Critiques of MotoGP have said that allowing such devices let’s less qualified racers into the premiere sport, and that the use of technology can make up where there would otherwise be a gap in rider skill.

Not surprisingly, some of the biggest names ever in the sport have shown signs of support for the rule change. It is unclear what exactly will happen in the future, but Ezpeleta has said that there must be further discussion of the topic, and that no change will occur for the 2009 season, yet looking at where other premiere class sports of gone, the road ahead looks more or less certain.

Source: moto.caradisiac

SkyNet may kill all of mankind, but it won’t take away our GP racing.

Dellorto is known in the automotive B2B world for its products in cars and trucks. Well now they are starting to offer their products for motorcycles, and Aprilia will be one of the first companies to integrate their technology in a product. What does this mean for the consumer? Well for starters, the RSV4 will be the first bike from Italy to have variable length throttle bodies. Read more after the jump.

 

Kawasaki has huffed the same crazy glue as BMW, and gotten themselves a video portal aptly named: KawasakiTV. Now while the BMW version has all the spit and polish you’d expect from the German AutoHaas, Kawasaki has all the lack-luster half-assed marketing attempts we’ve grown to cheerish from the Green Monster. The shows all of its ads, clips, and racing footage going back to 2006, although after playing with it for a bit, they appear to show you only a limited number of ads at random. Also, the site, for whatever reason, is in Spanish, but it’s easy enough to navigate around. The link can be found here.

On a marketing note. Kawasaki, why would you host a site on someone else’s domain? Why would you try and shoe-horn your logo onto a template that clearly is from a common bin. And lastly, who is your brand manager, and what street will he be committing ritual suicide over this botch job?

Source: moto.caradisiac

Wow, I can’t believe I got through this post without one reference to letting the good times roll…

General Motors CEO Rick Wagoner mentioned last week that, in addition to selling the HUMMER brand, other assets were being evaluated for sale, as well. GM has announced that it is selling all of its remaining stock in Suzuki. GM owns about 3% of the Japanese automaker’s traded stock making the cash infusion come in around $230 million.  More after the jump.

 

The Aprilia RSV4 seems to be all the news today, first we leaked you the price, and now we can show you what Max Biaggi’s World Superbike trim will look like. The bike has Max’s classic “3” logo, we imagine the final version will have a couple other stickers as well, unless The Emperor is sponsoring his racing efforts these days.

Source: motoblog.it via MCN

Max, with your new shiny bike, you’ll be the prettiest boy at the track this weekend.

Marchesini has released spec on its 2009 product catalog. Already known for having some of the most stiff and rigid rims in the industry, and for developing wheels made from molten magnesium and carbon fiber, Marchesini raises the bar now with their offering of forged magnesium wheels.

Their new production process uses Finite Element Method (FEM), which is a multidirectional way of forging magnesium, developed in the aeronautical industry. 

Refined by use in MotoGP, Marchesini is offering two lines for 2009: 

Komp:
A forged aluminum wheels designed for road use and available in various colors.

Komp R:
A dedicated to racing wheel that offers a weight saving of 25% – 35%. The Komp R wheel sell in both the standard 17″ wheel size, as well as that slightly more race friendly 16.5″ variety.

Espada:
A forged aluminum wheel that is built specifically for 125cc bikes.

Komp Motard:
Also a forged aluminum, this one as you probably guessed already, is designed to replace the standard spoked motard wheel. The goal of this wheel was to reduce the moment of intertia, and so far has had excellent results in the AMA Supermoto Championship.

Source: Motoblog.it

Racing pink is still not a color option.