Tag

Suzuki

Browsing

There has been much conjecture regarding the Suzuki Hayabusa in recent days, especially after the company’s Japanese website listed the Busa’s production as terminated.

This created a fervor on European publications, and because of the internet, it grew from there. We tried to talk some reason into the situation the other day, and now Suzuki Motor of America has made a press release on the matter.







Over the weekend, you may have seen reports from Europe about the demise of the Suzuki Hayabusa, as the venerable hyperbike has been rumor to go the way of the dinosaur, especially now that its Euro4 waiver is set to expire at the end of the year.

This has led to quite a bit of chatter about the machine’s future, with many of the headlines that we have seen focusing on the end of the iconic motorcycle’s run, and that production on the bike has ceased. But, what’s the real story?







Next up on our analysis of the EICMA show in Milan are the Japanese brands: Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha.

You can usually count on the Big Four to bring out some popular new bike launches and intriguing concepts to EICMA, and this year...well...the Japanese brands phoned it in, for the most part.

Before we get into Jensen's complete feeling of disappointment, I first have to apologize because I failed you as a publisher. Much of the disappointment that comes from the INTERMOT and EICMA shows comes from the implications of the Euro5 emissions standards. As a publication, we should have prepared you  better for this reality, and we didn't.

There is very little incentive right now for a motorcycle OEM to release a new model. Euro5 comes online for new models in 2020, and for existing models in 2021, which means that many of the motorcycle brands are holding onto their new bike launches for those model years.

As such, the 2019 model year is very much a "development year" for the industry. This doesn't change the fact that the Japanese brands had a weak showing in Milan, especially compared to the Europeans, but at least it explains why...for the most part.

To continue reading this story, you need to have an A&R Pro subscriber account. If you have an A&R Pro account, you can login here.

Suzuki has a recall out on 6,928 motorcycles because of a fuel pump O-ring that have been twisted during installation, and therefore is causing fuel leaks on three motorcycle models from the Japanese brand. The affected bikes include the Suzuki GSX-R1000 family (2017), the Suzuki V-Strom 650 family (2017-2018), and the Suzuki GSX-S750 (2018).







The INTERMOT show is done and dusted, and we have had some time to chew on the models that we saw in Cologne, Germany...or didn't see, as the case might be. The second largest trade show in the motorcycle industry, one can wonder though whether the INTERMOT show is the second most important.

Having two major shows on European soil, with INTERMOT coming every other year, creates a Sophie's Choice for motorcycle manufacturers. EICMA might draw the crowds and the press, but it is also a maelstrom of new models, and it is easy for a bike's launch and debut to be lost in the chaos.

To that vein, INTERMOT provides an opportunity for manufacturers to see the forest for the trees. It is less pressure, with most manufacturers choosing to debut more minor releases at the German show, but this makes it ripe for some surprises as well. For 2018, things were no different.

To continue reading this story, you need to have an A&R Pro subscriber account. If you have an A&R Pro account, you can login here.

One of the highlights from the INTERMOT trade show in Germany was the new Suzuki Katana. Set to be an early 2020 model, the Suzuki Katana takes the GSX-S1000F platform, and brings a unique retro-modern look to its chassis.

This means that the heart of this sport bike comes from the 2005 Suzuki GSX-R1000, which has been re-tuned for street duty.

Though Suzuki is light on details, this should mean a 147hp sport bike, with basic electronic aids. This should also mean an attractive sport bike for under $12,000 here in the USA, if our math is correct.













It may only be the third model year for this generation of the GSX-R1000, but Suzuki is bringing some smart updates to its “King of Superbikes” for the 2019 season.

The changes a primarily a response to the rule changes in the WorldSBK Championship, with the 2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000 getting some subtle refinements.

The most notable change is that the new adjustable swingarm pivot, which will help setup changes for racers and track day enthusiasts alike. Visually, riders will notice that the exhaust muffler on the 2019 bikes has been colored black, to help it blend into the rear tire and not stand out like a flying toaster oven..













The wait is finally over. The Suzuki Katana is back. Breaking cover at this year’s INTERMOT show, the 2019 Suzuki Katana takes an old classic, and makes it new again.

True the to concepts we have seen in previous years, the new Katana is a stylish modern take on the iconic lines from the the 1980s. 

Essentially a Suzuki GSX-S1000F with new bodywork, the new Katana isn’t perhaps all-new, in the truest sense of the word, but the bike evokes strong emotions for those who remember its past; and for a new generation of rider, the 1980s styling fan is just now becoming a thing, making this a well-timed launch.













It’s that time of the year again, where Christmas comes early to the motorcycle industry, and we get to see all the new motorcycles that will be coming for the next model year, and beyond.

For the 2019 model year, we expect to see new models debuting at the INTERMOT, AIMExpo, and EICMA trade shows, which are in Cologne, Las Vegas, and Milan.

With things kicking off in Germany next week, we thought we would put together a guide for all the new motorcycles that we expect to see in the coming weeks. There are a bevy of new models that we know will be released at these three trade shows, and there are more than a few rumors of new bikes as well, which may surprise us.







Without wasting anymore time, let’s get down to it. We have broken down the new models and rumors by each manufacturer. Enjoy!







Today we have an unusual story involving a recall. Suzuki Motor of America is piloting a program where it will pay owners to go get their recalls done, trialing the idea with the GSX-R owners who need to have their front brake master cylinders inspected and repaired.

The recall affects  2004-2013 Suzuki GSX-R600 & GSX-R750 models, as well 2005-2013 Suzuki GSX-R1000 superbikes. For those who get their recall completed between September 1, 2018, and November 30, 2018, there is a prepaid $100 Visa card in it for them.







The current generation Suzuki GSX-R1000 gets unfortunately neutered for the American market, but it is a stout superbike on the other side of the pond, where its 200hp is unleashed. Now our European friends get to see what the Suzuki GSX-R1000 can do when the Japanese brand cranks it up to 11.

Behold the Suzuki GSX-R1000 Ryuyo, a 209hp superbike that weighs 370 lbs (dry), and is our answer to the teaser photos that Suzuki has been sharing on social media. The work of Suzuki Moto Italia, only 20 Ryuyo-spec machines will be made for consumption, and they will cost €29,990 if you want one.

An homage to the Ryuyo R&D center that tests all of Suzuki’s new models, the Suzuki GSX-R1000 Ryuyo is an example of the technical prowess found at this Japanese motor house.