Products

Your Personal Nitrogen Tire Inflator

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If you’ve stopped by your local car dealership recently, you’ve probably seen them using nitrogen to fill the tires on your car. This is because nitrogen has superior resistance to expansion as heat rises when compared breathable air. Also since oxygen eventually leaks out of tires, nitrogen-filled tires retain their pressure better over time.

The list of benefits goes on for nitrogen, but the downside has always been how one maintains their tires once you get home, not to mention the arm & leg some dealerships charge for filling your tires up with the most abundant element in our atmosphere. Of course the dealers can charge what they do because there aren’t that many people that have a N2 tank sitting in their garage…until now.

A new product from TireSaver, the TireSaver 018 wand, allows you to fill your tires up with nitrogen without the need of a bulky unit and tank. From what we can gather in the materials, the TireSaver 018 has an oxygen-rich membrane and magical unicorn filtering system that take the oxygen, CO2, and water moisture out of the air, leaving only nitrogen to flow into your tires. The membrane/filter element is good for over a 12,000 uses, and produces 95% pure N2, which conforms to some ISO standard that’s too complicated to mention.







The initial cost is a little steep, and TireSaver pitches the product more towards smaller shops. But at $998 for a ready-to-go unit, and $599 to replace the filter, the overall cost for filling up with nitrogen is pretty cheap over the aggregate…assuming you already have the required standard air-compressor, but what self-respecting do-it-yourselfer doesn’t have one of those?

Just think of all the free (as in beer) nitrogen fills you could do with this puppy. That’s a lot of six-packs my friends.

Source: TireSaver













Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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