To call the last couple of years for MV Agusta turbulent would probably be understating the situation.

The company has struggled for financial stability ever since its re-acquisition by the Castiglioni family, and that struggle has recently come to a zenith with the firms debt restructuring and investment by the Anglo-Russian investment group Black Ocean.

With that comes some harsh realities, namely that MV Agusta will not be producing a new superbike any time soon, as the cost of the project exceeds the Italian manufacturer’s capabilities – so said MV Agusta CEO Giovanni Castiglioni while talking to Alan Cathcart for Australian Motorcycle News.

Instead, the company will focus on a new four-cylinder Brutale model, which will get a displacement increase to 1,200cc. We expected to see this machine at the 2016 EICMA show in Milan, but alas we will have to wait a bit longer for its debut…for obvious reasons.

Castiglioni is rumored to have sold somewhere between 30% and 40% of MV Agusta to the Black Ocean investment group, though no dollar amount has been associated to that transaction. Similarly, there has been no word regarding Mercedes-AMG’s ownership position in the Italian marque.

One would presume from the lack of news on this front that AMG’s interest’s remain in MV Agusta, and presumably that Giovanni Castiglioni no longer has an outright majority in the company’s ownership structure, both of which would be interesting developments in MV Agusta’s ongoing saga.

MV Agusta has also quietly rolled back its volume expectations for motorcycle production, with Cathcart reporting that MV Agusta plans now to sell 5,000 units annually, down from the 9,000 figure we have previously heard from Castiglioni.

That figure is more in line with the number of staff that we are seeing let go from MV Agusta, with the workforce going from roughly 300 people down to a number below 200. AMCN reports too that the R&D department has shrunk from 70 people to 40.

With much still to come from MV Agusta’s debt restructuring, new model development, and 2017 racing plans, we see no shortage of news coming from Italy about this historic brand. Stay tuned.

Source: Australian Motorcycle News

  • Mike V

    I hope MV can get their house in order. I think they make the most beautiful bikes. Their WSBK team did a decent job last year too.

  • LeDelmo

    Same here. I have always loved MV’s. I am glad they are at least going to release the New Brutale.

    This couldn’t have happened at a worse time for them ether. After all MV is just now finally making bikes suitable for joe public.

    I really feel like they did too much too quickly.

  • CBR Sean

    And it still boggles my mind why PJ made the move.

  • Hornet

    i guess they put in more effort to their WSS than Honda. Which isn’t saying much.

  • Wayne Thomas

    MV Agusta simply doesn’t have the cash flow to keep going. They either need a sugar daddy willing to keep MV Agusta at a loss in order to keep a halo bran, of MV Agusta must start producing scooters and other smaller bikes at volume in order to generate cash flow. Its not enough to only be profitable, but you also need cash flow.

    Anything else is only delaying the inevitable…..

  • AHA

    The best thing that could happen is that they get a non-Italian car company (or similar) to be that sugar daddy. It worked for Lambo and Ducati after all.

    AMG should have been a perfect candidate but clearly not. Perhaps one day that particular story will out.

    Meanwhile, its a white knuckle pillion ride…

  • Nicko55

    They should break from the norm and exclusively focus on middle-weight models for the time being. The 675-800cc triple is clearly excellent and competitive in comparisons and in racing.

  • Superlight

    Yes, and they already have that market pretty well covered. I still can’t understand why they haven’t produced an F3 with Ohlins, M50 Brembo calipers, forged wheels and CF bits except for the early release Oro model. Now about the number of dealers in the USA…

  • Fat Owens Fat

    Hey Superlight, you still reading this? Hate to say it but “I told you so”

  • Fat Owens Fat

    Hahahaha. What did I tell you 3 weeks ago? Hahahaha.

  • Superlight

    “Told me so what”? The Castiglionis have proven, first father and now son, that they have plenty of passion and little business sense. This is not something new. They need an entity like Texas Pacific Group was for Ducati not so many years ago to send them in the right direction. Let’s hope that happens.

  • Superlight

    Maybe it’s because the MV has shown itself to be very competitive on-track these past few seasons.

  • NortNad

    Smart move I reckon. Why develop something that wont sell. People want nakeds…

  • Moto 949

    After PJ proves the MV F3 is the best all around supersport by winning the WSS title, and when MV comes to their marketing senses by finally announcing a highly profitable, semi-comfortable artsy-retro (a la Magni and Walter Siegl) for well to do older riders who want an Italian Thruxton, then MV might turn it all around.

  • MikeD

    They are right up there when it comes to looks & design…can’t speak for the rest.

  • MikeD

    Personally i think they should become “A Better and more Exclusive Italian Triumph”: Make and sell only Triple powered motorcycles. It’s in their DNA too.
    I’m not too thrilled about their I-4 growing to 1.2L(and that’s coming from a delusional power monger) but i guess Euro 4 has got everyone by the balls…(x_x)

  • MikeD

    Hey, hands off Superlight ! Go back, do the line and wait for your turn !
    I’m grilling him first next year’s at EICMA when Ducati announces they are sacrificing their beloved Sacred Cow L Twin in favor of a 90* V-4.
    Or maybe i’ll get grilled…we’ll see. (^_^) hehehe…

  • MikeD

    True but you always need a HALO Product…sales or not. It’s a matter of time. It’ll will come back again.

  • MikeD

    Black Ocean…………sounds like some underground gigantic crime syndicate…(o_O)’

  • Superlight

    Only Ducati controls their product portfolio, not me, so they may well introduce a V4 Superbike in the future. That in itself doesn’t make it right or the best move from a marketing standpoint. For my part, I don’t dislike the V4 configuration. I like it, the I3 and L2 setups as well.

  • Superlight

    Apparently you haven’t been following the WSS class for the past few years. MV is the only brand that been able to keep the Kawasakis honest, that has given them consistent competition.
    I’m an MV owner and absolutely do not want them to do nostalgia bikes, but maybe some others do.

  • Superlight

    I can, since I own an F3. One of the more exciting bikes to ride, very gutteral and raw motor with easy and precise handling. Not perfect, but a really fun machine.

  • Superlight

    And what did “Trans Pacific Group” sound like when they were running Ducati a decade ago?

  • Moto 949

    Um, that’s exactly what I meant about the F3 by saying PJ will take the championship. I have been following it closley enough to know all MV needs is a bit more reliability, which improves with each DNF they learn from, and a top rider, like PJ. I do hear ya about the retro bike ’cause we might not want to think of MV as trendy, but if they did go that way, it’d be a thing of beauty and, like Porsche’s once unthinkable Panamera and Cayenne, it might just save them from sinking away forever…

  • MikeD

    Shipping Container Corporation ? A decade ago i didn’t even look at Ducati.
    Me liking their products it’s a fairly new hobby…i say hobby because it still don’t make me part with my $$$ at one of their “stores”.

  • Superlight

    You make snide comments about “Black Ocean” and I just wanted you to know that Ducati owes some of its current success to a bail-out from the private equity firm Texas Pacific Group. May MV be so lucky.
    So where does MikeD shop for his motorcycle toys?

  • MikeD

    but it isn’t obvious why you’d go crazy for a V4 while hating on V-twins.

    Don’t hate them, look at my “magnificent” avatar. I just want an even playing field, no more petting the retarded mascot. Everyone gets 1.0L, how you slice it it’s your problem.
    If you go twin you go broke against 4 pots, hence my pushy opinion of “just do a damn V-4”.

  • Superlight

    I’m not sure what the MV equivalent would be for the Panamera or Cayenne to secure sales volume. Touring bike? MV’s already got one of those. Adventure bike? No, doesn’t feel right. Cruiser? Absolutely not.
    Maybe MV should stick to its brand DNA and sell a special version of the F3 with many of the race-proven suspension/braking/engine bits at an elevated (but still relatively affordable) price. The best looking/performing middleweight you could buy. Not a huge market, but one where they’d have a unique selling proposition
    This is my MV. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c34ad7d4b3182207656a550641bf995fc9008c634f4b440c36cc814ced5bda2e.jpg .

  • MikeD

    I sure as Hell ain’t got no MV Augusta or Ducati $$$. Craigslist IT’S THE SHIZNIT.

  • Superlight

    So you have an SV650? Nothing wrong with that until you make negative comments about the newer or more expensive machines. Unless you’ve modified your SV with newer suspension/braking bits (which a lot of guys do) you won’t understand the new stuff at all.

  • Moto 949

    Touring? Cruiser? No, I specifically said semi-comfortable retro bike a la Magni or Seigl. Surely you’ve seen these 800cc revamps channeling MV’s look of the 70s. MV themselves could create an exciting, breathtaking version. I only referenced those Porsche vehicles to note that Porsche broke from their standard fare of wonderful, but profit limited, sports cars to stay alive. Do I want a Panamera? Never. Did it save Porsche? Yup. Now, is a retro-cafe bike trendy? Perhaps. But just might save MV from bankruptcy… because yet another limited paint job slapped on the old, uncomfortable, last-in-every-comparison-test-since-it-came-out F4 ain’t gonna keep MV in the black. But investing in a heritage line will, IMHO.

  • Superlight

    Interesting comments. Retros aren’t my cup of tea, but maybe it could work for MV. I’d still like MV to sell a more exotic F3 though, to leverage the racing success.

  • Superlight

    Fewer cylinders need more displacement to be equally competitive. It’s all about the stroke being longer on twins which relates to max piston speed which relates to max HP production. The same is true for 6-cylinders versus 8-cylinders. Who the heck cares about everyone being on only 1000cc machines except you? Variety, as they say, is the spice of life. All 4-cylinders in WSBK would be boring.

  • Fat Owens Fat

    I was referring to our last month’s conversation regarding Jacobsen switching over from Honda to MV Agusta at times of financial crisis.