Bikes

Moto Morini Rebello 1200 Giubileo

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It looks like Moto Morini gave up on its month-long teasing of the new Moto Morini Rebello 1200 Giubileo, with the company’s latest bike breaking cover today — two weeks ahead of schedule. That is just fine by us, since we had already forgotten about the Rebello 1200 Giubileo and its painful jigsaw puzzle reveal strategy, and the move is even better for the motorcycle public because Moto Morini has quite an interesting bike to show here.

A street-standard with some café racer touches, the Moto Morini Rebello 1200 Giubileo looks like quite an elegant bike with some very nice finishing touches being shown in the company’s limited photo set.

Easily our favorite detail is the unique “electric moveable saddle” that takes the Rebello 1200 Giubileo from monoposto to biposto with a simple flick of switch, while maintaing the bike’s rear-cowling look. It would seem gone are the days of having to remove a rear seat cover, or swapping out a rear cowl for a padded seat. Molto bene.







The design of the Rebello 1200 Giubileo continues the Moto Morini aesthetic tradition, and will probably be a love it or hate it sort of affair with enthusiasts. Priced at €13,900, the Moto Morini Rebello 1200 Giubileo comes with some nice kit, like a steal trellis frame, Brembo brakes, 50mm Marzoochi forks, and an Öhlins shock, though it doesn’t seem destined for the US market any time soon.

The motor is the same 1,187cc v-twin power plant found in many of the company’s latest models, and produces 130hp. Weighing 434 lbs (197kg) at the curb without fuel, the Rebello 1200 Giubileo isn’t terribly heavy, though we imagine its core demographic won’t be terribly concerned about things like that.

The Rebello 1200 Giubileo celebrates Moto Morini’s 75th anniversary, and is the first model produced by the Italian company since its resurrection from bankruptcy last year.













Source: Moto Morini







Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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