Bikes

Norton Atlas Finally Breaks Cover, With Two Scrambler Variants

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We have been waiting for quite a while to see Norton’s Atlas street bike project in the flesh, and now it is here…in two varieties.

The two machines are called the Norton Atlas Ranger and the Norton Atlas Nomad, and they are both scrambler models. The Nomad is geared more towards road use however, with its 18″ front wheel; while the Ranger has taller suspension for better off-road capabilities, along with a 19″ front hoop.

Both bikes share the same 650cc parallel-twin engine with a 270° firing order, which makes 84hp and 47 lbs•ft of torque. The motor was co-developed with Norton’s V4 project, and it is essentially the four-cylinder engine with its rear cylinder bank lopped off.







Tipping the scales at 392 lbs (178 kg) dry, Norton has done a good job of keeping the weight down, especially for a class of motorcycle that can often reach 500 lbs at the curb. The hope is to have a set of Norton that can effectively navigate the green lanes of England, which still being an everyday-rider for its owner.

Norton hopes to sell 2,000 of its Atlas models each year, and to do so the company is going to price the bikes aggressively £9995 for the Nomad and £11,995 for the Ranger.

To hit those price points, some sacrifices had to be made. ABS is switchable, and of the non-cornering variety; traction control is rudimentary, with three options: on-road, off-road, and off; and the gauges are old-style analog units.







Suspension is handled by Norton’s own Roadholder brand (though the forks are fully adjustable, the rear shock has only preload adjustment), while brakes come from Brembo’s budget lineup.

Attractively detailed though, the Norton Atlas bikes should be an intriguing option for those in the market for a hertiage-styled road bike. Game on, Triumph.

Norton Atlas Nomad

Norton Atlas Ranger

Source: Norton

 













Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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