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Jensen Beeler

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While in Laguna Seca for the US GP, Fiat Yamaha riders, Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo, along with Monster Yamaha Tech3 riders, Colin Edwards and James Toseland, stopped by the Yamaha North America corporate offices for a little press stop and corporate tour.

Wanting to make the most out of the trip, Yamaha put together a video that reveals the secret to their riders’ success.

The NHTSA is considering whether anti-locking braking systems (ABS) should become a mandatory component to new motorcycles on American roads. ABS has certainly become an increasingly prevalent optional feature on street bikes, with sportbikes just recently catching onto the trend.

Honda first released the VFR Interceptor with ABS back in 2002, and both BMW and Honda released bikes with optional ABS this year. We’ve also seen other safety features from cars finding their way into motorcycles, with integrated airbags in leather suits, and bikes offering rear-wheel traction control systems.

To us, this seems like a logical extension of existing technology into motorcycles, but for the NHTSA this is more serious issue of climbing motorcycle crashes, as both more riders take to the streets, and new riders join the motorcycling ranks.

MCN is reporting that there will be no new ZX-10R debuted this year, as Kawasaki is breaking out of their 2-year production cycle in order to focus on a WSBK killer for the 2011 season.

You’ll have to scroll all the way down the 18th spot in the World Superbike Championship standings if you want to seen Team Green represented. Even BMW with their brand new bike, and first entry into true sportbike territory, has found greater success in the world production motorcycle racing venue (currently 16th & 17th in the WSBK standings).

We’re not sure how accurate this rumor is at this point, but it is clear that if Kawasaki wants to be a “race on Sunday, sell on Monday” company, they have room for improvement.

Source: MCN

In Europe, 125cc bikes and scooters are possibly more prevalent than the 600cc+ bikes we’ve grown accustomed to seeing in the United States.

Due in part to the cost of insurance and fuel, as well as cultural difference, we’ll have to look over the latest creations from British firm Megelli, and know this is a line of motorcycles we’ll unfortunately never get to feast our eyes upon in person.

Donington Park recently played host to 45 Ducati Desmosedici RR owners, as they spent an exclusive track day courtesy of Ducati UK. The video of the bikes starting their session is after the jump, but we’re trying to decide what’s more impressive: the sound the bikes make as they leave, or the fact there’s nearly $4 million of machinery going by without an umbrella girl in sight.

If you didn’t know it by now, let us spoil the surprise from this last weekend’s Dutch GP for you: Rossi has claimed his 100th victory. With a century of wins under his belt, Rossi is only the second rider to achieve such a feat, and along that journey, an impressive array of statistics can be compiled.

Dorna Sports has compiled a list of Valentino’s accomplishments, which really showcases what a monumental rider the Italian is, and begs the question, will a rider every be able to fill the shoes he’ll leave behind? Continue reading for a comprehensive breakdown.

In its stock form, the Cagiva Mito is not the most outlandish motorcycle every created. It boasts only a tiny 125cc motor, that makes barely 15hp. But when Simone Barbagallo got his on an unsuspecting Mito, the result was something quite the opposite of ordinary.

Barbagallo has increased the little elephants peak power to 90hp by adding a supercharger and NOS system to the donor bike. Not willing to call it quits, he then proceeded to bore out the motor 200cc’s. With almost no stock part left to be replaced, the result is what Simone calls, the Scorpion Performance, and he’d be willing to part with it for $55,000.

The Gran Prix Commission, which consists of the FIM, Dorna Sports, the IRTA (satellite teams), and MSMA (bike manufacturers), met while in Assen this weekend and have announced several new rules to the MotoGP and Moto2 series for 2010.

Most notably is the the single-tire rule that will be adopted for the inaugural Moto2 season, and that Dunlop will be the provider for all the tires in that series.

If the close racing of Race 1 wasn’t enough drama for the fans at Donington Park, Race 2 provided it in full. Another breakaway start, and a couple key crashes, lead to a shake up in the finishing results, and one rider was rushed off to the hospital for a suspected fractured vertabrae that might change the course of the season. Continue reading for spoilers.