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Husqvarna Has Another Year of Record Sales

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In case you missed it, KTM as a company is doing extremely well, selling over 180,000 units last year. KTM the company now has two brand of motorcycles under its roof though: its namesake, and then also the Swedish brand of Husqvarna.

The latest report from Mattighofen suggests that the sales success of KTM isn’t due solely to the KTM brand, and that Husqvarna had a very strong 2015 as well.

As such, Husqvarna is reporting that it sold 21,513 units in 2015, an increase of 31% over last year’s figure of 16,337. This means that 2015 was another record for Husqvarna, the best in the company’s 112 year history.

Husky says much of that growth came from the North American market, though it doesn’t offer any numbers to backup that information.

We would imagine though that since KTM was able to expand Husqvarna’s dealership reach in the USA and Canada, that those gains easily translated into more bikes sold in those markets – the dealer network being one of Husqvarna’s weaknesses prior to Stefan Pierer’s purchase of the brand from BMW Motorrad.

While KTM is surely enjoying the success of Husqvarna, the incremental change in Husqvarna’s sales shows that KTM as a company is still seeing its growth come from KTM the motorcycle brand.

We would expect the Husqvarna brand to continue to grow over 2016, with the 701 Enduro & 701 Supermoto models hitting dealers, and as Husqvarna continues to add more dealerships.

A broken record at this point, we will also be curious to see this year how Husqvarna begins to define its brand and motorcycles away from KTM. We know that the 401 Svartpilen will be coming as a production model for 2017, and that the 701 Vitpilen could be something we see in production form as well.

So far, the market seems to have reacted favorably to those designs, but the ultimate proof is in the sales receipts.

Source: Husqvarna

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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