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2020 BMW S1000RR Priced for the USA at $16,999*

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BMW Motorrad has finally revealed its pricing for the BMW S1000RR in the US market (read our ride review here), and the price tag should excite superbike riders. First, the good news: the 2020 BMW S1000RR comes with a $16,999 MSRP.

The bad news is of course that it is almost impossible to ever get a BMW model at the base price listed, as they are virtually never imported into the US, with instead the motorcycles coming decked-out in their optional packages.

But even then, BMW Motorrad USA has surprised us with this machine’s offering in the Land of the Free.

Taking a trip through the company’s bike configurator, that $17,000 motorcycle instantly gets a $1,400 price increase with the “Select” package pre-added, and it doesn’t seem that it can be removed from the build list. Call the FTC, because that’s called a bait-and-switch.

The “Select” package does bring some goodies though, in the guise of semi-active suspension (DDC), heated grips, tire pressure monitoring, and cruise control.

For another $1,600 you can get the “Race” package, and that adds the “Rides Mode Pro” – which basically adds all the electronic stuff you would expect on a superbike, i.e. launch control, wheelie control, race modes, dynamic traction control, slide control, etc. It also adds a lithium-ion battery and forged aluminum wheels.



So for $18,600, the 2020 BMW S1000RR, becomes pretty much on par with the base model offerings from the other European brands, with the addition of forged wheels. And, for $20,000 the bike is spot-on what you would get from the up-spec models from other brands.

Depending on how you look at these price point, this could be a good or bad deal coming from BMW Motorrad. For comparison, the 2019 Aprilia RSV4 RR is priced at $17,499 and doesn’t have forged wheels at that price point. Meanwhile, the Honda CBR1000RR SP will bring more features (but less horsepower), with a price tag of $20,000 MSRP.

There is an interesting bracket developed with the first two packages, but where the BMW S1000RR really seems to find its bang-for-the-buck value is with its “M Package” trim level.

BMW Motorrad won’t let you get the “M Package” without also adding the “Select” package (with notably the DDC suspension), which means you are building a $22,100 motorcycle, but you do get a lot of performance and features for that price point.

This is because the “M Package” includes everything found on the “Race” package, but adds carbon fiber wheels to the mix. You would be hard pressed to find that many features on any superbike on the market at this price.

For example, the Ducati Panigale V4 S hits the wallet with a $27,895 price tag, and still stiffs you on the lack of carbon fiber wheels. The recently revised Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R SE is closer in price to the BMW, with a price of $21,899, which includes semi-active suspension, but only forged wheels.



As we expected, the 2020 BMW S1000RR came with a sizable price bump over its predecessor, but along with it came some serious value in the “M Package” configuration.

We are not fans of how BMW Motorrad USA advertises its motorcycle prices and plays the packages game with consumers, as that is often misleading once you get to the dealership, but if you do let the Germans take you for a ride, they do drop you off at a pretty good final destination.

Will the new “RR” be the superbike of the year? That might depend on which packages you are picking at the dealership. We shall investigate further.

It is worth noting that BMW Motorrad USA is designating this bike as 2020 model year machine now, and saying that we can expect the new S1000RR to arrive sometime in the “summer” of this year. Whether that means as early as June, or as late as August, remains to be seen.

Source: BMW Motorrad USA

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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