Honda-Light-Weight-Super-Sports-Concept

When it comes to the small-displacement trend that we’ve seen from manufacturers, Honda’s offering is competent, but lacking when compared to what has come out from Kawasaki, KTM, and Yamaha.

If the Honda’s “Light Weight Super Sports” concept (super high-resolution photo above), which will debut at the Tokyo Motor Show, is any indication though, the Japanese manufacturer is about to blow the competition out of the water with what will likely be the Honda CBR250RR.

All we know for certain right now is the following statement from Honda:

Designed with the key phrase “strong presence”, this next-generation super sport concept model features a look possessing a sense of speed derived from its long nose and low crouching position. The combination of surfaces – creating a sense of hardness and solidity – and sharp edges, emphasize the aggressive look. Moreover, the exterior featuring matte-black-based low-contrast graphics underlines its beauty and eye-catching form.

However, many take this as a sign that Honda will return to its history of making high-revving small-displacment sport bikes for hardcore riders and track day enthusiasts.

The concept shown has a different chassis from the Honda CBR250R and Honda CBR300R, which bode well for the machine being substantially different from what is on the market now from Honda.

We can only speculate to the changes under the hood, though enhancing the photo in Photoshop suggests a parallel-twin engine. The edgy bodywork indicates that the concept has the performance to match it.

Hopefully Honda will reveal more information at the Tokyo Motor Show, and fingers crossed we see a screaming Honda CBR250RR in our near future.

Source: Honda

  • BBQdog

    Way better looks then the current CBR250R in any case.
    Never understood why they designed that ‘sailing boat’.
    Big problem with al those twin 250’s however is that they weight far too much to be a sport bike.

  • Ur Momma

    I pray to the moto-gods it’s a V-4.

  • Paul McM

    For the U.S. market I can’t see much interest in this, except for some guy who wants a slow but revy, easy-to-ride track day bike. I’ve ridden Honda’s recent 250 street bikes. No point in an engine that small in this country IMHO. They really felt buzzy and underpowered on the freeway. When a really cherry used 500-600cc machine can be had for less money, why buy a 250?

  • Bruce Steever

    DO you have any idea how much that would cost? I don’t see a market for $15,000 250cc sportbikes, do you?

  • Bruce Steever

    Or maybe someone who isn’t looking for 70-100 hp in their first bike. Stop thinking about what YOU need from a bike.

  • tony

    do you always tell people how to think

  • tony

    again, poopooing on people. boo bruce!

  • Bruce Steever

    Yeah, usually.

    I’m not saying i’m not a hypocrite, but that doesn’t make me wrong. Stop projecting, and drop the ad hominem while you’re at it.

  • Bruce Steever

    Just sprinkling a dose of realism on the people before i grab some lunch…

  • tony

    you sure say stop alot! i say go go go! people i believe we have a new prophet of doom in our mist! anyway, about the bike…

    is it me or does it “borrow” alot of styling cues from the kwak hp2 ? see bruce, i can be a negative nelly also !

  • Westward

    From the photo, I thought it was a Kawasaki.

    Glad to see a manufacturer not treat a smaller displacement bike like a throw-away machine. This actually looks like some real effort was involved…

  • Westward

    I also want to see it with 300cc or a Yamaha version…

  • Bruce Steever

    Yes, yes, but only I can bring the air of smug superiority that a few years as a moto-journalist can provide. /s

  • Bruce Steever

    What do you mean “Yamaha version?”

    The YZF-R3 has been around for a bit now…

  • grahluk

    I’l join the negatoids here. Is this “bold new graphics” for the budget 250 sport set? Or specifically bold new plastics? All the Honda statement talked about was looks. Nothing about anything this may be as a better performer as their current budget 250/300 sports moto. The graphics mimic what may be under the plastics. From that it looks to be a similar boring parallel twin. No high revving 4 cylinder CBR400RR like existed 20+ years ago. Also another budget pseudo trellis cheap steel frame. No modern space age cast frame like the bigger CBR’s or extruded beam frame like the CBR400RR or any of their production 125 or 250 stroke sports bikes of 20+ years ago. They better not put RR after this model name. It is not that. Maybe CBR250R but not RR.

  • VForce

    No one would love to see that more than the V4 faithful such as myself.

    But, Bruce is right, there is no way in hell that people would pay 600 supersport money for a sub 400cc bike. Especially when the sportbike market is still soft.

    We have no one to blame but ourselves on this unfortunately. Those hyper supersports were super hot in Japan in the 90s and didn’t sell at all here. And that was in the height of the Japanese sportbike wars. Japan got the coolest of all 400s. In the US, the FZR 400s, CB1s, Bandit 400s were universally praised by the media but ignored by buyers. They wanted hp, not handling.

    So now, in Part 2 of the Japanese entry level sportbike wars, we get parallel twins instead of multi fours. We should probably be happy we are at least getting that.

    This CBR 250RR does give some hope to the segment.

  • Ur Momma

    As an owner of a grey market ’87 GSXR400 I know exactly what you mean.

  • VForce

    Lucky (Napoleon Dynamite voice). Gorgeous machine

  • Joe D

    Have they addressed the crappy shift mechanism? The four in my training fleet are despised by all. The dealer cannot find the problem and the district manager trotted out a service bulletin that does nothing to fix the issue. Now I’m stuck with out of warranty crapsickles.

  • Jose Ferrer

    One difference between the 90’s market and now is insurance. I don’t think motorcycle insurance was even available back then but now it’s mandatory. I don’t know about all insurance providers, but for mine there’s a magical price jump at 576cc. Sportbikes under that can get full coverage for a song. Above that, you need a second mortgage. It really sucked when they reclassed the Versys from a standard to a sportbike. If we could get the 400’s of the 90’s today, at about 60hp, I think they would be popular. They would be lower insurance than the 600s and run right with them in anything but a straight line.

  • tony

    touche my man, touche..

  • Diesel

    It will be slow. Who cares

  • 56

    its good to see some asia focused bikes make it out of south east, if they can sell them for 30% less then making them faster will be affordable and good for local tuners

  • VForce

    Insurance was available, required and even more expensive in the ’90s. As sportbike sales grew, us youngins just kept crashing sportbikes at an incredible rate. It wasn’t uncommon to see at least one wreck a week when I was riding around Chicago in the ’90s. And that was all before the stunting craze.

    The OEMs realized that it was hurting sales. Yamaha offered insurance for a very brief time when you purchased a new FZR. It about killed them financially if I remember correctly! And remember the Hurricane name? Dropped and changed to just CBR in part because customers could not even get insurance companies to talk to them.

  • john

    Right looks for its intended market. I’m pretty sure it’s a single cylinder.

    I can understand why of the ‘sailing boat’: to succeed in the south asian market.
    However why they named it “CBR250R” beats me. It disappointed me to no end.
    Since it’s a single cylinder, it should’ve been named “CB250F” and this new one a “CB250RS”.
    That way, they could’ve kept the expectation for a hot 250cc 4cylinder CBR alive.

  • Roasted Piglet

    I would pay that for something 90% as good as the Honda Moto3 bike.

    Problem is, almost no one else would.

  • Roasted Piglet

    I would buy that if it had a 25,000 rpm redline.

  • Roasted Piglet

    The downside to high insurance is a squid that paid $8K for a 2 year old liter-bike is not going to pay $3-4K a year for collision coverage, so they will likely just get liability and comprehensive. So when the bike gets damaged, the squid buys cheap parts off eBay, no questions asked, which drives up thefts of sportbikes.

  • Roasted Piglet

    Sorry, but the dog camping guy has you beat for smugness.

  • Roasted Piglet

    Because 600cc supersport race replicas are worthless to ride until you are going over 80 mph, which a speeding ticket in most places. And they are more than anyone short of a better than average amateur level racer can use on the track.

    Only on the Internet is a supersport a good beginner bike, and someone who does not move up to a liter-bike in a few months a “looser” (sic).

  • Roasted Piglet

    1986-1993 Honda CBR250 twin: 346-lb wet, 45-HP
    2011-2014 Honda CBR250R single: 364-lb wet, 23¾-HP

    Wee bit of a difference, eh?

    Hope the CBR250RR is more like the older bike than the newer one.

  • Ducati Kid

    Gentleman,

    A careful visual analysis shows TWO (2) Exhaust Header Tubes exiting the Engine.

    It joining a U.S.D. Fork, Pro-Link Rear Suspension and Aluminum Swingarm affixed to a Steel Frame suggesting one fine motorcycle for Countries implementing 250cc limitations.

    Sporting REPSOL HONDA Team graphics it would make a perfect replica.

  • n/a

    Heap of junk, I’d rather have a Harley than any of these modern 250/300/500 bikes.

  • I won’t hold my breath yet, but I’ve long been itching to buy a CBR250RR. If for no other reason that it sounds cool. Yeah, say what you want. Sadly, they are very difficult to get to the states.

    Will be interesting to see how this pans out and where it stacks up against the R3 and Ninja 300.

  • grahluk

    They could release one of those 90’s era JDM sub 400 sportbikes now and it would seem like a revelation! The real dirty secret is that they don’t build to that high of quality any more for small displacement bikes. I’ll stick with my statement that they could name this new bike a CBR250R but would be lying to call it an RR.

  • grahluk

    Amen! Preaching to the choir here but I fear it’s full of moto atheists. As someone who came up on bikes in the 90’s owning a YSR, NSR250, RVF400, and Hawk GT’s I fully drink the the kool-ade that 60-80hp in a light (~300lb) sport chassis rules the twisties. That sort of power is scaled just right for street and back canyon pace. This might be part of the reason the sports bike market has tanked save for the upper upper end limited edition farkle fest starbuck poser cycles and the guys who like going stupid fast in relative straight lines on freeways. The people who really dig the corners have found that that ideal <300lb 60hp scalpel today is a Sumo.

  • Bruce Steever

    It’s not so much quality, it’s cost – a 400cc 4-cyl sportbike costs the same to build as a middleweight 4-cyl 600.

  • Bruce Steever

    Whoop! Whoop! Squid alert! Secure all flip-flops and Ray-Bans immediately! This is not a drill!

  • Bruce Steever

    HAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

  • n/a

    I hope that’s laughing with me and not at me? I am not a fan of Harley’s but I’d still rather have one than these 250/300/500’s.

  • Bruce Steever

    Sorry, but i’m not with you on this one. I’ve ridden nearly everything in my past life as test rider, from scooters to superbikes, nakeds and tourers, ADV bikes and cruisers. This includes the entire Rushmore line-up of “new” Harleys. Dismissing a modern bike (your words) in exchange for a Harley just makes me cackle. Sorry if that makes me more than a bit of a douche…

    I can say without a doubt that Honda’s 500’s are some of the best bikes on the road right now, offering real performance, value and quality of construction. I can also tell you that riding a 300 (or KTM’s 390) is one of the most giggle-inducing rides that you’ll ever take. I’m riding a 1200cc ADV pig right now, and i fight for the chance to ride lightweight stuff any chance i get.

    Now, that being said, i personally don’t own either 300 or a 500 right now. I’m a one bike household at the moment, and i need a bit more touring ability and practicality for my well-fed self. So i ‘get’ personal preference, and thus should probably shut my trap – but i still can’t help chuckle.

  • BBQdog

    @Nick Stolten: we did ride a Ninja Z300 and an KTM Duke 390 back to back, swapped bikes frequently. The Z300 was no match for the Duke, not in power, torque, steering, braking and especially weight. The Z300 felt like it weighted 20kg more (and It probably does). The Z300 won on one point, it felt more refined and civilised. On back roads a twin is no match for a single. The R3 might be a faster highway bike tough ….

    Forget about sporty 250-300cc twins, they are way too heavy and you have to milk them out totally to get any power.

  • JSTNCOL

    @wessiler:disqus
    You should get in on this dance.

  • Paul McM

    Mr. R.P. I never advocated “600 cc supersport replicas”. I simply said the good 500-600cc bikes can be had on the used market in cherry condition for less than a new 250. 500cc and up standards will have adequate torque and will be capable of decent highway performance. I have ridden new-production Honda 250s on California Freeways (where folks go 80 mph). They are not “incapable” of the task, but more displacement is a good thing. Years ago I had a shaft-drive Yamaha Vision 550 that I toured extensively on… it was hardly a “race replica”.

  • Roasted Piglet

    Good, then I can ask him what he thinks of the Husqy Terra and Strada.

  • Roasted Piglet

    Where do you find a <300-lb, 60-HP SuMo, except at track?

    My Xmoto is 50-lb heavier and 7-HP short of that mark, but is still a hoot to ride (for the first two tanks of gas).

    The KTM 690 SMC R/Husqy 701 comes a bit closer at about 330-lb and 66-HP.

  • Roasted Piglet

    And almost as much as a I-4 liter-bike.

  • Roasted Piglet

    The Honda Moto3 single has two exhaust pipes (as does the KTM Moto3 single).

  • JSTNCOL

    All questions for @wessiler:disqus should be directed to @seanmacdonald:disqus.

    Don’t ask @arihenning:disqus, though he thinks the Strada is better than the Duke 690. And we all know that’s not true!

    Maybe you should ask @uncleloomis:disqus…

  • Roasted Piglet

    I have not tried a Duke or RC390, but I would rather ride a big thumping SuMo than any of the current 300cc class sportbikes. Of course, most of the road surfaces where I live are crap – might like the little sport-bikes better if I lived in a place with mountain roads and high quality pavement.

    The SuMo does have a problem, in that everything starts looking like a fun challenge to try to ride over, rather than an obstacle to be avoided. Traffic calming features go from annoyances to fun, and the cones in construction zones are for slalom runs. Not to mention all the potential urban shortcuts that the plod would not approve of.

  • Roasted Piglet

    On the other hand, if the 250cc twin weighed 260-270 pounds, instead of 360-370 pounds…

  • Roasted Piglet

    Lemmy thinks I am odd. ;)

  • JSTNCOL

    Lemmy could be on to something…

    :-D

  • Ducati Kid

    RP,

    True!

    With small displacement Oriental competitors today featuring Twin cylinder Engines believe HONDA would review the Global and local markets then introduce a superior product.

    Suggest the cycle shown represents HONDA’s latest ‘Thailand Twin’.

  • Kenny

    Back in the early 90’s the original CBR250R & RR’s did sell for the same as the steel framed CBR600’s.
    I’d disagree with your assessment that quality didn’t play a factor in that.
    All of Honda’s 4-cyl 250 and 400 sportbikes featured Al frames, gear driven cams, stratospheric redlines, sweet handling and other goodies from the NC series bikes (Honda’s 2 strokes).
    Just from looking at the spec sheets, those pocket rockets had more in common with an RC30 or Fireblade than they did with the venerable CBR600F

  • LongTravel

    Hey guys, just one tidbit to remember about the good old days of 400cc RR level machines: Their development was driven heavily by the licensing and taxing laws in the Japanese market. That’s the only way the market supports a 400 that costs the same as a 600 up front.

  • grahluk

    We don’t need to pick nits about this. You know what I’m saying & by your opinions not of an entirely different mind on the subject. For curiosity’s sake the Ape SXV550 and Husaberg F650 come pretty close to those figures on paper at least but yeah, on the track is more where I was getting at as where that ideal could be found. I’ve a friend who has an 85hp sub 300lb Hawk GT that barely meets street trim that is an absolute terror in the twisties. A 25+ year old bike that kills the latest digital liter bikes everywhere but the open highways. Also a CRF450R sumo with plate & lights that produces nonstop grins, wheelies, & black lines through corners. Both bikes obscenely modified. You’re right, OEM street sumos come in a few pounds heavier and a few HP lower to not live such a high strung life but plenty of fun and for corner carving a lot a very compelling alternative to overbore supersports, superbikes, or cheap small bore look a likes that have more in common with take out delivery bikes than sporting machines. I’m all for Honda & others aiming for the small bore sports set as long as they keep reloading and firing till they hit the mark.

  • Roasted Piglet

    I was hoping to buy a sub-300 pound, 60-HP street legal SuMo (I live in a state where even the governor could not get a non-EPA/USDOT bike licensed for street use). Was the Husaberg F650 street legal?

    As for the Aprilia SXV550, is there still one on the west side of the Atlantic with an intact bottom end?

  • Csorin

    KTM 500 EXC is right around 50hp to the wheels and sub-300 lbs wet. It’s incredibly fun on the street and a hoot at the racetrack. With one bike I’ve done 1700 mile dirt trips in enduro form, switched the wheels and front brakes out, and had a blast at the track in motard form.

  • Roasted Piglet

    How about the Husqvarna FE 501 S? Add a shock linkage to the 500 EXC and paint it blue and white, eh?

  • sidspacewalker

    I don’t think they’ve officially named it yet so there’s hope :)

  • sidspacewalker

    Exactly, I currently own the CBR125R 2011 edition and I’ve quickly realised it’s limitations. I’d like some more power and for the love of god – good brakes. The CBR250RR would be perfect for me to gain experience on before moving onto a 600cc.

  • Sean Cleary

    Please be 3 or 4 cyl. I will be one of the first to buy if it is. I just like lightweight bikes, but miss the 4cyl character.

    They could sell the 250rr alongside the 300. The 1 cyl bike would cost ~$4,500, while the 4 cyl would cost ~$6500 – $7500 (above 8k it starts to compete with the 600’s too much). Two totally different bikes.

  • Sean Cleary

    The honda cbr250 only makes about 25 horsepower. A hypothetical 2016 cbr250rr would probably make about 55-60, and be built with proper SS brakes, suspension, and ergonomics, but still with 250 weight (~370 or less lbs). At the right price point it would sell very well, and be way more fun than a 600 to ride, because you can open the throttle up all the time, and outhandle any 600.

    I’d buy it for as much as $8000 OTD maybe.

    If they could do it at $7k it would sell like hotcakes on todays market I think, whereas in the 90’s every single American just wanted raw power. Also this would essentially displace the cbr500r.

  • Chocodog

    I’m guessing this bike is aimed at club racing, development racing for youngsters. Still, it looks great and this may be a hint at what the new CBR 1000 will look like.