Bikes

Honda CB-F Concept Debuts with Retro-Modern Flare

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The Tokyo Motorcycle Show and Osaka Motorcycle Show have had to scratch this year because of coronavirus concerns in Japan, but some motorcycle brands that would have been attending are taking a more “virtual” approach to their exhibits. 

That is bad news for our Japanese readers, who were hoping to go to these shows for a super dosage of two-wheeled goodness, but for us here in the United States, it means that more of the shows will be accessible from across the Pacific.

First on the docket comes to us from Big Red, which just launched its own virtual expo website, and first on the list is this Honda CB-F concept, which just dropped with its retro lines and modern chassis and engine.

If the bike looks familiar to you, it should. First of all, the underlying platform is the Honda CB1000R, which itself is a riff on the Honda CBR1000RR from far too long ago. 

Second, the bodywork is said to be inspired by the Honda CB900F, from the late 1970s and early 1980s, and to our eyes, it is a pretty close approximation of the popular street bike’s look.


Channeling its retro-modern tastes, it is interesting to see Honda once again tapping the CB1000R platform for its design, perhaps because the Japanese brand has long ago broken even on the engineering that goes into the motorcycle’s parts.

In the same way that Honda Motor Europe loves to riff on the CBR600 series, Honda HQ in Japan loves its 998cc sport bike variations.

We can’t fault them too much for that though, because the Honda CB1000R is a solid package, and lends itself quite well to some interesting design experiments.

It is not clear where Honda intends to take this CB-F concept, but the Japanese brand does seem interested in exploring what other variations it could make fo the “CB” line of motorcycles.

With that in mind, what say you dear readers? Yay or nay?

Source: Honda

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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