WSBK: Brett McCormick Stable After Neck Fracture at Assen

04/22/2012 @ 9:59 pm, by Jensen Beeler15 COMMENTS

WSBK: Brett McCormick Stable After Neck Fracture at Assen Brett McCormick Imola Effenbert Liberty Racing WSBK 635x423

Injury-wise, it has been a treacherous season in the World Superbike paddock so far this year. While everyone patiently waits for good news about Joan Lascorz, this weekend another ride has suffered a neck injury: Canada’s Brett McCormick. Crashing in Race 2 at Assen, the Effenbert Liberty Racing rider was immediately attended to by the circuit’s medical center, where it was deemed he had suffered trauma to his cervical spine (the same area Lascorz injured), but thankfully did not appear to have any damage to his nervous system.

While ruling out everyone’s worst fear, McCormick did suffer a tremendous crash, and has facial trauma, which includes a hematomas to his eye sockets. The Canadian has also sustained a fracture to his right thumb, and was sent to the hospital in Assen for further evaluation for all these injuries.

Doctors at the hospital confirmed that McCormick had fractured his fifth and sixth vertebrae, and has since be transferred to the Groningen hospital where doctors will stabilize his condition. We will post further updates about McCormick as we get them, and hope for his speedy recovery from this incident. Fans can tweet get-well-wishes to the likable Canadian rider via this link.

Source: WSBK

Comment:

  1. Gritboy says:

    Hope Brett recovers quickly and completely.

  2. dc4go says:

    Get well soon Brett!!!

  3. Jake says:

    Ugh. It feels like in the not so distant past, serious injuries were an infrequent occurrence in the premier series (WSBK and MotoGP). Recently, it’s gotten so bad that you wonder, “who will we be praying for this week?”

  4. Barry Stewart says:

    Don’t these recent cervical spine injuries suggest it’s high time that neck braces (e.g. Leatt type) were made compulsory in road racing? It beggars belief that pretty much every part of a riders body is now protected to some degree, with the exception of one of the most vulnerable – the neck!
    The Technology exists to mitigate the potentially devasating consequences of hyperflexion and hyperextension injuries to the neck (it has a high take-up in off road two-wheeled disciplines), yet it is pretty much ignored in closed circuit racing.

  5. I think it’s a question of time before a motorcycle version of the HANS systems used in car racing shows up in SBK and MotoGP. Sure motorcycle racers need more mobility than car drivers, but I think they’ll trade some mobility and weight for safety. Compare a current rider’s gear to the suits, boots, gloves, and helmets worn by Agostini or Hailwood, and you’ll see that such a trade is well underway…

  6. mxs says:

    The device already exists to you and me. Professional racers could have had it for some longer time. The problem is not a mobility, it’s a loss of straight line speed. Simply, it’s hard to manufacture a device sitting on top of the leathers, without effecting the airflow significantly and thus speed of the bike and a rider.

    I doubt many racers will except the trade-off … unless the racing body regulator will make it mandatory like a helmet.

  7. I’ve tested the Leatt prototype for streetbike riders, and it is profoundly cumbersome to the movements of fast riding. The last thing I want to happen when I’m craning my neck to look through a turn is to have my helmet get caught up on some collar that’s bobbling around on my shoulders while I ride. Hopefully someone will have a think about this problem, and come up with a better system.

  8. Michael Brown says:

    I’ve been following Brett’s career for a few years now since I saw him race here in Canada and I’ve met his family. I remember that his grandfather was at the track but couldn’t watch him race as he was too afraid that something bad would happen.
    I was so sad to see him go down. The crash looked unusual and nastier than most the way he did a faceplant. And he was doing well against some of the best riders in the world who’ve raced on that track umerous times before.
    Saddening. I hope he’s back soon and does really well.

    Go Brett!!!

  9. mxs says:

    ********
    I’ve tested the Leatt prototype for streetbike riders, and it is profoundly cumbersome to the movements of fast riding. The last thing I want to happen when I’m craning my neck to look through a turn is to have my helmet get caught up on some collar that’s bobbling around on my shoulders while I ride. Hopefully someone will have a think about this problem, and come up with a better system.
    ********

    I didn’t use one myself, so I cannot tell. But I know a local racer who has and he said he had no issues. So whether all of them would feel like you or not is hard to tell.

  10. Schyler says:

    Get well soon brett! Also doesn’t the spidi airbag setup provide emergency neck support? Seems better to have that instead of a brace catching your helmet.

  11. *SIGH*

    Another man down. Heal well, Brett!

  12. Barry Stewart says:

    There is a South African rider using a Leatt brace in BSB here in the UK. I understand that there are now versions of these and other similar devices (eg Alpinestars) more suited to track use. Airbag technology such as Dainese D-Air (increasingly seen in Moto GP and WSB) is promising, but is not “primary” in the sense of being “permanently deployed” like all the other protective gear (helmet, armour etc) is. Just as a car airbag works with the seatbelts , airbags in leathers could srely be designed to work with a helmet and neck brace combination.

  13. Singletrack says:

    It was heartbreaking to see and learn more of Brett’s injury. I was keeping my fingers crossed for better news.
    At least it’s nothing permanent.

    And virtually the same situation happened to Smrz, although he was much luckier with the result.
    I hope Effenbert will wait for Brett’s promising talent to return.

    As a Canuck, he gave me new reasons to watch theWorld Supers again.

  14. SBPilot says:

    Face planting is very dangerous as thats the exact type of fall that will snap your head back and cause spinal damage. I face planted last year while crashing and even at moderate speed and on grass my neck was sore after for quite sometime.

    Sooner or later a neck braces will be widely used. Question is will they deploy from the suit to block the helmet from moving back or a Leatt type brace. Lascorz and now McCormicks accident is really making me think about the Leatt brace for this season…

  15. Singletrack says:

    I think a fair question to ask Brett (when he recovers further and gets back to training) is…

    …will you wear a Leatt or similar neck brace upon return?

    Or perhaps in the meantime, ask the experts – would a neck brace have prevented (or lessened) Brett’s spine injuries?