Governator Gets Ready to Pump $20 Billion in Speed Camera Violation Revenues into California

02/16/2010 @ 7:01 pm, by Jensen Beeler15 COMMENTS

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger is pushing for a massive statewide speed camera initiative which could help super-set the Golden State’s budget to the tune of $19.9 billion in revenue, and make the state $397.5 million in bulging net income. California is currently sweating a massive budget deficiet, and despite Arnie’s chopper riding roots, he seems to see stretching government control as a method to dead-lift California out of debt.

Speaking several days ago, Gov. Schwarzenegger said the following, “various federal rules are tying our hands and preventing us from reducing costs in some state programs. I want to remind the federal judges and the politicians California is not Washington. We do not have the luxury of printing money or running trillion-dollar deficits.” Schwarzenegger was is obviously referring to the federal government’s ability to flex its influence with the U.S. Treasury.

The move for speed cameras isn’t exactly a new one in the United States, but this is the first we’ve heard of an entire state adopting such a lean and mean program. Phoenix, Arizona for example has a speed camera system in place, and charges tickets in the ballpark of $30 per infraction. No word yet if California’s proposed ticketing structure will be similarly priced if the measure goes through.

Source: Arnold Schwarzenegger Soundboard

  • makes me happy i got out of california when i did, uhg, i hate big brother bullshit like this.

    i drove through phoenix recently, and those mobile speed cameras are such a huge pain in the ass.
    -peter

  • Sean

    $30 a ticket, Californian’s are getting off lightly.
    Speeding fines here in NSW (state of Australian) are in the hundreds (even thousands) of dollars. In Victoria (another Aust. state) people started slowing down, resulting in reduced fine revenue so the govt reduced the speed tolerance to make up the short fall.

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  • Andrew Gray

    Credit for the Arnie photo goes to who???

  • Doctor Jelly

    Huh, that’s funny, I could have sworn the outrage from the public in Phoenix was putting a stop to traffic cameras… Not to mention the projected revenues from the original installation of the cameras has fallen woefully short with people slowing down in known camera spots (all are marked with warning signs at least a few hundred feet before the camera in Phoenix) and people flat out refusing to pay their tickets.

    The backlash in Britain against traffic cameras has even been violent, with co-ordinated groups of people (I’ve seen motorcycle gangs specifically cited) purposely hindering or destroying traffic cameras (spray painting the camera lens, dropping tires around the poles and lighting them on fire, etc.).

    I think Arnold is going to find this isn’t his saving grace…

  • Sean Mitchell

    It’s $10 for every mile over the limit where I live. Total BS. Arny, this is a form of taxation in my opinion, one that belies your Republican roots.

  • Ghostdog2007

    Fucking Arnold, you lame ass!

  • Rob

    Arizona’s photo enforcement fines are $181 per infraction, not $30.

  • Rob I’m looking at $30 ticket from Phoenix right now….dunno what to say.

  • spencer buffington

    I’ll be with the subversive crowd. This cannot go on. I guess the highest acceptable goal of a citizen is to watch TV and ride the couch. For those of you who think this will stop in Cali, don’t be fooled, it will spread across the welt.

  • It’s common knowlege (same as the sky is blue) that the statewide system in AZ, which is run by the Dept. of Public Safety, charges in the high hundreds for its speed cam tickets. To try to pin it down a little closer, I did a quick Google on it and found a year old article quoting $165, so with inflation the $181 figure stated by Rob can’t be far off – unless it went up even more on Jan. 1 of this year!

    I am in California, and for those who might visit this state, or who live here, here is a special note about California’s existing red light camera ticket program. (As in many fields of endeavor, we do it differently. Not better, just differently.)

    Here the red light camera tickets cost about $500! (No one knows what the governor’s proposed speed cam tickets will cost, but it is likely to be the maximum that the market will bear.) The red light camera tickets also put a point on your license. Because they put a point on your license, the police have to get the name of the actual driver before they can file the ticket at court. Since the photo of the plates leads only to the registered owner (“RO”), and he/she often was not the person driving the car, about 40 California police depts. mail out a document that looks like a real ticket, but isn’t, to bluff the RO into ID’ing the actual driver of the car. These “Snitch Tickets” haven’t been filed with the court, so are recognizable because they don’t say “Notice to Appear,” don’t have the court’s address, and say (on the back, in small letters), “Do not contact the court.” Since they have NOT been filed with the court, they have no legal weight. You can ignore a Snitch Ticket. If in doubt, Google the term.

  • It’s common knowlege (just like we know that the sky is blue) that the statewide system in AZ, which is run by the Dept. of Public Safety, charges in the high hundreds for its speed cam tickets. To try to pin it down a little closer, I did a quick Google on it and found a year old article quoting $165, so with inflation the $181 figure stated by Rob can’t be far off – unless it went up even more on Jan. 1 of this year!

    I am in California, and for those who might visit here, or who live here, here is a special note about California’s existing red light camera ticket program. (As in many fields of endeavor, we do it differently. Not better, just differently.)

    Here the red light camera tickets cost about $500! (No one knows what the governor’s proposed speed cam tickets will cost, but it is likely to be the maximum that the market will bear.) A ticket from our existing red light cameras will also put a point on your license. Because the tickets put a point on your license, the police have to get the name of the actual driver before they can file the ticket at court. Since the photo of the plates leads only to the registered owner (“RO”), and he/she often was not the person driving the car, about 40 California police depts. mail out a document that looks like a real ticket, but isn’t, to fool the RO into ID’ing the actual driver of the car. These “Snitch Tickets” haven’t been filed with the court, so are recognizable because they don’t say “Notice to Appear,” don’t have the court’s address, and say (on the back, in small letters), “Do not contact the court.” Since they have NOT been filed with the court, they have no legal weight. You can ignore a Snitch Ticket. If in doubt, Google the term.

  • bs
  • Will

    Here in Georgia they just initiated the same B.S., a “super-speeder” law. I imagine other cash-strapped states will follow. More aggravation for folks who like to ride, while the rolling wrecks, cell-phone talkers, make-up artists, texters and other driving-while-blind types get a free pass. After all, it’s always been about revenue, not public safety.

  • Rob

    Mr. Beeler,
    The fine from the state enforcement system is $181. Municipalities have their own photo enforcement systems which are mostly red-light cameras and carry a similar penalty. The private company who runs the program, Redflex, makes $30 off every ticket. Maybe this is where your confusion lies…

    Here is a news story that will help you with your future research to prevent another mistake in your articles:
    http://www.scpr.org/news/2010/02/16/intense-backlash-against-arizona-speed-cameras/