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Patent Application Shows Off the Indian FTR1200 Street Bike

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The Indian Motorcycle company has been teasing us about the upcoming FTR1200 street bike that it’s bringing to market next year, and now we have a pretty good look at the machine, thanks to a patent application with the USPTO.

Showing the engine and chassis of the Indian FTR1200 in line drawings, we can see that the new street bike will have a trellis frame, and an engine that looks very much like the v-twin motor found on the Indian Scout cruiser.

The total package looks like the makings of a solid street tracker motorcycle. The wheelbase is compact, and our measurements in Photoshop suggest a 19″ front wheel, with an 18″ rear. The riding position looks upright, but aggressive.







Additionally, the engine looks like a stressed member of the frame. Of note too is the swingarm, which looks like it came right off the Indian FTR1200 Custom concept.  Our eagle eyes spot an LCD dash, underseat fuel tank, dual front brake rotors, radial mounted calipers, and an interesting place to hide a battery.

The shock is offset to the side, like on the Indian FTR750 race bike, but instead of the high-mounted scrambler exhaust that we would expect on a street track, a dual-tipped system is used, which has a very “Ducati Monster” look to it.

While this patent images give us a good idea of what to expect from the Indian FTR1200, what remains to be seen is what engine Indian has tapped for the FTR1200. The concept bike sourced an 1,133cc v-twin from the Scout cruiser. With a name like FTR1200, we would expect a new and larger motor for this street tracker, but looking at the line drawings, the engine looks exactly like the Scout’s. We suspect the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.







Firm specs and proper photos are a few weeks away, as we expect the Indian FTR1200 to debut at the INTERMOT show in Cologne, Germany. Thanks for the tip, Alex!

Source: USPTO







Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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