Dirt

Behold the Honda CB650R Rally by Honda Wingmotor

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That the Honda CB650R and its ilk make for excellent custom motorcycles should be an established fact by this point in time. Honda Motor Europe has prove this point extensively with its bevy of customs over the years.

So, it does not surprise us to see that the Japanese brand’s operations on the Iberian peninsula are using the CB as the basis for a custom bike build competition. What does surprise us though are some of the entries, as they are truly unique.

Take for instance this example, dubbed the Honda CB650R Rally. It’s done by Honda Wingmotor in Lisbon, Portugal, and as the name implies, it is a rally raid interpretation of the venerable street bike.


Now, we are not so sure how a 649cc inline-four motor is going to hook up in the dirt, and with the Honda CB650R tipping the scales at 447 lbs at the curb, we can think of a few better places to start building an adventure racer, but you have to appreciate what these crazy Portuguese have created. However, the bike looks the business.

There are Continental TKC 80 tires are mounted front and bike on the 17″ wheels, along with a full rally tower for navigation, including a roadbook.

The bodywork has been reworked of course, with the neo-café look making way for the more purposeful dirt bike styling. A solo seat, handguards, and fork guards complete the look. Of course, the iconic header pipes are on full display.

Fitted with a tribute to Paulo Gonçalves, who died during this year’s Dakar Rally, the bike is a rolling tribute to the Portugese racer, who was also a long-time Honda rider.

Of course, the bike also commemorates Honda’s win at the 2020 Dakar Rally, where American Ricky Brabec rode the Honda CRF450 Rally to a commanding victory – the first for Honda, in over 30 years to win the prestigious race.

The work is a fitting tribute to both men, and an intriguing concept. Kudos to the Honda Wingmotor team on their build.


Source: Honda Garage Dream

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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