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Yamaha Trademarks “FJ-09” for the US Market

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In the digital age, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) have become a good resource for sleuthing out upcoming machines from motorcycle manufacturers.

The publicly accessible online databases have outed Ducati’s plans to build a “frameless” motorcycle (later known to be a patent for the Panigale), tipped-off the coming of the water-cooled engines to Harley-Davidson, and even hinted at Honda doing something with the Africa Twin name.

Trademark registrations have tipped off bikes like the Ducati Diavel, Ducati Scrambler, and Yamaha YZF-R3; and for today, it seems another motorcycle has been outed by the government agency: the Yamaha FJ-09. Registered with the USPTO, the FJ-09 is likely to be a three-cylinder sport-tourer, if the tuning fork brand keeps to its naming conventions.







Historically, the FJ line has been touring-focused, with the FJR13000 currently towing the sport-touring line here in the United States. It makes sense then that Yamaha could introduce a smaller displacement model for consumers, and it makes even more sense for Yamaha to use the FZ-09 platform to do so.

Yamaha has made no secret about its desire to use three-cylinder engines in upcoming models, and with the FZ-09 (MT-09 for our international readers) being a hit, and relatively cheap to produce, Yamaha has seemingly decided to double-down on its investment.

The timing is appropriate, as A&R just recently published several concept sketches by Oberdan Bezzi, which used the FZ-09 as the basis for a three-cylinder adventure-tourer.







It shouldn’t take much for Yamaha to make the transformation on the FZ-09, a full fairing, some bags, and poof…an affordable, comfortable, and powerful middleweight tourer. Sign us up for one.

Source: USPTO via Motorcycle.com







Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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