Bikes

Timbersled Snow Bikes Look Like Serious Fun

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I was surprised when I discovered that we haven’t spoken about Timbersled before now, and the company’s line of snow bike conversion kits. It’s a concept that’s been intriguing me for some time now.

That intrigue started when the Idaho-based company was acquired by Polaris last year – adding to the juggernaut that Scott Wine is creating in Medina, Minnesota – which is where I first saw Timbersled’s interesting take on motorized winter fun.

For those who don’t know, Timbersled’s concept is a pretty simple one: it allows dirt bike owners a fairly straight forward kit that enables them to create a snow bike for winter riding.

As you would imagine, the riding experience is considerably more dynamic than that of a snowmobile; and with the front and rear wheels replaced by a ski and track, it allows a rider to go much farther in the fluffy white stuff than a traditional dirt bike allows.

The tracks themselves are modular in design, and they bolt-up to different motorcycles via an individual install kits from Timbersled. There are four track designs in total, the Short Track (ST – $5,300), Long Track (LT – $6,000), and the two Snow Cross models (SX120 – $5,800 & SX137 – $6,500).

The beauty of Timbersled’s design is that it is fairly easy to convert a Timbersled back into a dirt bike, allowing riders the ability to have a sled for the snow-covered days, and a dirt bike for the warmer weather. This hopefully helps offsets the cost of a dirt bike and a track.

We doubt that diehard snowmobilers will convert over to the dark side, but Timbersled’s hope is that its designs will open up a new type of riding in snowy weather. Judging from the photos and video, they might be onto something.

Timbersled-ST-track-05

Timbersled-LT-track-01

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Timbersled-ST-Raw-track-01

Timbersled-ST-track-02

Timbersled-ST-track-06

Timbersled-SX120-track-01

Timbersled-SX120-track-02

Source: Timbersled

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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