Bikes

Husky Goes Electric, Here Comes the 2020 Husqvarna EE 5

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Another established manufacturer is signaling its electrification, this time with the OEM being Husqvarna Motorcycles. The Swedish brand is tied in ownership to KTM, which has its own EV program, so perhaps the news isn’t that shocking, but nevertheless, here we are.

As such, you can expect the first electric Husqvarna dirt bike to come during the 2020 model year, as the Husqvarna EE 5 was put on display at this year’s EICMA show.

The motorcycle is a bold step forward, though not a big one, as the 2020 Husqvarna EE 5 is designed with young riders in mind.

The mini-bike makes 5 kW in power from its permanent magnet motor, hence the name, which is comparable to what a 50cc four-stroke motor produces.

With a 907 Wh battery onboard (48V with 84 Li-ion cells), riding time is pegged at 2hrs. Recharging should be quick, due in part to the small battery size, with Husqvarna quoting a 80% recharge time of 45 minutes, while it will take closer to 70 minutes to reach a full recharge via an external charger.

The bike has six riding modes, and comes with WP Suspension’s XACT air forks. The overall machine looks a bit crude, certainly less of the elegant solution that KTM produced in the Freeride E, but at this price point and use case, this probably matters less.

The real takeaway here is that the electrics are coming. The only thing that surprises us is that more established motorcycle brands didn’t show an electric model at EICMA, just Husqvarna, Harley-Davidson, and Kymco…and interesting trio, if we do say.

Pricing and availability haven’t been spoken about yet, but we expect that information as we get closer to the Husqvarna EE 5’s 2020 release date.

Source: Husqvarna

As always, Asphalt & Rubber will be covering all the new bikes debuting at EICMA this year. Be sure to follow our coverage for the most recent news and photos.

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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