Bikes

Behold, The Indian FTR1200 Street Tracker Is Here

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They did it. They actually did it. Debuting today at INTERMOT, the Indian Motorcycle brand released its newest motorcycle, the 2019 Indian FTR1200.

The only production street tracker currently available on the market, the Indian FTR1200 takes its inspiration from the Indian FTR750 Scout race bike that is dominating the American Flat Track series, and in the process brings the company’s first non-cruiser motorcycle to market.

Answering the calls of many, the FTR1200 production bike is visually very close to the FTR1200 Concept we saw several months back, and it will come in two flavors: the base model Indian FTR1200, and the up-spec Indian FTR1200 S. Expect it to drop, Q1 2019.

The Indian FTR1200 builds off two things: visually, it takes its aesthetic from Indian’s 750cc flat track race bike, and physically it is an evolution of the Scout cruiser platform. Don’t let that fool you though, while the water-cooled, 1,203cc, 60°, v-twin engine looks very similar to the one used on the Scout, it is an entirely different motor.

Accordingly, the FTR1200 engine is much lighter than its cruising sibling’s power plant. It also has a much higher compression ratio (12.5:1), a different crankshaft (which is 10 lbs lighter), a larger bore (102mm), different cases, and a different swingarm pivot on the engine case.

All of this translates into a peak horsepower figure of 120hp (8,250 rpm) and a peak torque figure of 85 lbs•ft (6,000 rpm), which is modulated through a six-speed close-ratio gearbox with a slip/assist clutch.



Holding things together is a tubular steel chassis and swingarm, which attaches a 19″ front wheel and 18″ rear wheel to the motorcycle, which helps keep the machine’s look visually similar to a flat track race bike. Throw in Dunlop’s new street legal DT3-R flat track tires, which have the requisite speed block pattern, and you have all the makings for a handsome street tracker.

As is becoming common place, Indian will bring two specs of this machine to market, at two different price points. As such, the 2019 Indian FTR1200 will retail for $12,999 MSRP and come only in black. Conversely, the 2019 Indian FTR1200 S will have three color schemes, and will start at $14,999 MSRP – but it will be a cool $15,999 MSRP for the race replica paint.

While the basics are the same for the two trim levels, the motorcycles differ on electronics and suspension.

The Indian FTR1200 has three riding modes (Sport, Standard, & Rain), Bosch cornering ABS, and IMU-powered traction control (with stability control and wheelie control built-in to the algorithm), as well a color 4.3″ TFT touch-panel dash that can be updated over time. The S model also has fully adjustable Sachs suspension for and aft. It tips the scales at 489 lbs (dry).

Conversely, the FTR1200 base model has a more basic analog speedometer, standard ABS (which cannot be turned off), and Sachs suspension that has no adjustment capabilities at the forks, while the rear shock has adjustable preload and rebound settings. The FTR1200 base model tips the scales at 488 lbs (dry), one pound lighter than the FTR1200 S model.

Both bikes have LED lighting all around, a 3.4 gallon fuel tank that is located mainly under the seat, Brembo brakes on each wheel, with dual 320mm non-floating discs up front, mated to four-piston M4.32 calipers.



With its debut at INTERMOT, it should be obvious that Indian plans on selling the FTR1200 worldwide, with Europe perhaps being the largest market for the street tracker. We can also expect the FTR1200 platform to beget other non-cruiser models from Indian, with the bike’s super-flat torque providing an excellent basis for other model types.

This makes today’s news about the Indian FTR1200 an important step for the American brand, as it moves from being a heritage-focused cruiser brand, to a more robust house of American two-wheelers.

2019 Indian Scout FTR1200 Photo Gallery:

2019 Indian Scout FTR1200 S Photo Gallery:

Source: Indian Motorcycle

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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