17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

The current state of the World Superbike Championship rules entirely encourage the adoption once again of “homologation specials” – production bikes whose sole purpose is to be used on the race track.

While none of the manufacturers have adopted a radical approach with their homologation special designs, this year’s INTERMOT show has already seen several such machines introduced, the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10RR, the Suzuki GSX-R1000R, and the Honda CBR1000RR SP2.

For Honda, the differences between the SP and SP2 aren’t terribly radical, but they are more purposeful.

The 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP2 does come with several visual cues that are different from the CBR1000RR SP model: carbon insert panels, gold striping on the tri-color paint scheme, and the more obvious Marchesini wheels.

The real differences though are under the hood, and in the two race kits that will be available from Honda.

The Honda CBR1000RR SP2 shares the same 76mm bore at the SP model, but CBR1000RR SP2 cylinder head runs intake valves that are 1mm larger (31.5mm), with the exhaust valves also being larger by 1.5mm (25.5mm) in diameter.

The valve angles have also been changed to 10°/12°, from 11°/11°. The valve pitches are identical, thus maintaining the cylinder head width.

Honda says that the pistons have also been changed, with the Honda CBR1000RR SP2 using an exclusive crown design, along with a heat treatment that strengthens the area around the piston boss. This too has been modified, with a piston pin that is 2.5mm shorter, which is thus 8 grams lighter.

The inline-four engine on the SP2 is ready for high-lift camshafts, says Honda, while the total height and thickness have been reduced to save weight.

While both the SP and SP2 run the same 13.0:1 compression ratio, the different valve setup makes the SP2’s combustion chamber more efficient. Throw into that mix longer spark plugs, along with a water jacket around the cylinders to improve cooling, and you have a machine that’s ready for some hot-rod tuning.

Though the electronics packages are the same for both the 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP and 2017 Honda CBR1000RR SP2, the SP2 has exclusive settings. Modifications can be furthered with two kits: one for dedicated racers, and the other for track enthusiasts.

Expect to see the Honda CBR1000RR SP2 available mid-2017-ish, with a price tag under $25,000. Expect to see Nicky Hayden on one much sooner than that though.

Note: we kept the photos on this page at their original ridiculously large size, so you can open them up and see all the nuanced details on the SP2. Enjoy!

CBR1000RR SP2

CBR1000RR SP2

CBR1000RR SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

17YM CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and SP2

Source: Honda

As always, Asphalt & Rubber will covering all the new bikes debuting at the INTERMOT and EICMA shows this year. Be sure to follow our coverage for the most recent news and photos.

  • sigsegv

    Holy 80 MP images Batman.

  • CBR Sean

    Say no more…

  • n/a

    Any further information about the race kit for either this or ZX10RR?

  • coreyvwc

    Curious that the SP2 model still uses the Semiactive Ohlins forks which are not homologated for racing used. I know Ducati equipped their homologation special PanigaleR with high spec mechanical forks for that reason.

  • Chocodog

    Beautiful bike, hats off to Honda. Can’t wait for tests and rider reviews.
    Thanks Asphalt and Rubber, I guess we don’t have to wait until Oct. 9th.

  • Statement Plus

    25k, that’s quite a bit. A racer then needs to spend at least another 3-5k to convert to race. What I think manufactures should start doing is take a page from Aprilia and then add some. As a racer, I’d love to buy a race ready bike with race wiring harness, race bodywork, tires, rear sets etc. straight from a manufacture at a premium. At this stage I do not mind paying more because I’m getting the bike ready to go built by the best people. I save time and also money from converting. The manufacture will then also do a sizing up/sag/position and offer optional IMU set up day at your local track with a Honda tech for an extra cost.

    Aprilia offers that but only for their top line WSBK bike. But honestly, that type of service is what should start setting these bikes apart. For the reason alone that Aprilila will build you a race bike ground up makes them so attractive. Converting can be such a mess. The big 4 + BMW/Ducati can really use their dealer network to utilize this offering.

  • Mitchel Durnell

    Honda actually offered the 600 and 1000 in ‘body in white’ specials, at least in Japan for a year or two. The take up on privateer racers is absolutely tiny, so I can’t see it every really being profitable in any way. http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/Honda/honda_cbr_600rr%201000pista.htm

  • SKD007

    The rear swing arm just looks like the rcv211v 😳

  • Shawn Kitchen

    Why, oh why, does Honda insist on putting that cover plate over the frame hole? It looks so tacked-on.

  • ColonelClaw

    LOVING these massive photos. Click the last photo of the wheels and zoom in to 100%. On the hub of the left wheel you can see something probably written by an Italian Marchesini worker that Honda forgot to rub off – awesome!

  • MrDefo

    I really like the front fairing, it looks like a helmet. Good call, Honda.

  • major tom

    OK!!! I’m impressed. Classy paint scheme Honda, here in the states we’ll probably get some boring blah look though. Still…………? It’s tasty for Japan, Honda still has their sense of the old timey quality, sometimes.

  • Csorin
  • Good eye!

  • “No aftermarket or prototype electronically-controlled suspensions maybe used. Electronically-controlled suspension may only be used if already present on the production model of the homologated motorcycle.”

    WSBK Rule 2.4.10.2(e)(i)

    Ducati equipped the Panigale R with mechanical suspension because of weight.

  • Nope. But, I’ll see what I can find out.

  • The images are free, but the handy wipes will cost yah. ;)

  • Shawn Kitchen

    True that, but the mounting boss is still visible, so it still has a “wart on Miss America’s nose” vibe to it.

  • coreyvwc

    Interesting, I wonder if any of the teams will give it a try?

  • jp83

    some of the engine cases are black and some are gold.