New Cost-Cutting Rules for World Superbike Starting in 2014

06/07/2013 @ 4:10 am, by Jensen Beeler12 COMMENTS

New Cost Cutting Rules for World Superbike Starting in 2014 World Superbike logo 635x425

The FIM, Dorna & MSMA have been able to come to an accord on the new rules for the World Superbike Championship, and the name of the game is cost reduction.

In a series of changes that will begin in 2014, and applied over the next three seasons, WSBK will see a price cap for the teams’ race motorcycles and their components (rumored to be €250,000).

A maximum number of engines will also be set for each rider, a rule that has already been implemented in MotoGP with a great deal of success.

The last provision seems to be a guarantee from the manufacturers that a minimum number of motorcycles “with the same state of tuning” will be made available to teams for lease or purchase, though this provision doesn’t seem to distinguish from factory and satellite spec machinery.

The brief announcement from World Superbikes is after the jump.

The FIM, Dorna & MSMA are pleased to announce that a new framework for the Superbike Technical Rules has been obtained after many discussions between the parties involved. The new Superbike rules will be applied progressively, starting in 2014, in 3 stages.

The aim was focused on the reduction of cost and to fix a maximum price for the motorcycle and its components, to be reduced in yearly in the next 3 years. The price of the motorcycle and its components will be much lower than today’s cost. Furthermore, a maximum number of engines for use by a rider during the complete season will be introduced. Items considered for cost limitation are suspension components, brakes and gearbox ratios.

The constructors present in the FIM Superbike World Championship agreed to have a minimum number of motorcycles with the same state of tuning, available for sale or through lease.

A draft of the new technical rules will be published soon.

Source: WorldSBK

Comment:

  1. Faust says:

    Well, the cost cutting in BSB definitely hasn’t made it any less fun to watch so we’ll see. I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s some people at aprilia who are worried about the restrictions on number of engines. They are probably like “can we restrict the number to like…..39?”

  2. Norm G. says:

    30 engines, that’s my final offer.

  3. CTK says:

    The bikes are somewhat less important than the quality of racing. If this enables people to be more competitive I am for it.

  4. Greg says:

    Hopefully Dorna will also secure a more mainstream broadcaster for the US in 2014 as well. More viewership = more advertisement revenue for them.

  5. DareN says:

    Greg,
    I am on the fence with this one. Mainstream TV station would never let us enjoy the quality of broadcast Al Jazeera (oops.. Be In) provides. We will get 60 min. broadcast with 20min. of commercials (see your reference to advertisement moneys). Maybe the sheiks do not need cash that badly…

  6. Faust says:

    DareN

    I’m not on the fence with that one because Be In is not available in my part of the country. I’ve taken to watching sbk on YouTube…… I miss being able to see it on tv.

  7. sburns2421 says:

    The Be In website has it streaming live, plus you get world supersport.

  8. dc4go says:

    @ Faust.. Aprilia won’t have any issues with engine limits they already comply with MotoGp’s 12 engine CRT rule. There’s no truth to Aprilia running a new motor per race that’s all nonsense.

  9. Jake F. says:

    Basically Dorna’s price caps will turn MotoGP into World Superbike, and World Superbike into World Superstock.

  10. Faust says:

    I’m sorry, we were talking about Arilia engine durability? I couldn’t hear that over the sound of Laverty’s engine detonating.

  11. Faust says:

    *Aprilia

  12. Faust says:

    Lol, watching the billowing smoke flow from Guinters’ exhaust this weekend made me think of this post. Yup, no problems there. Two factory engines detonated on live TV in back to back events. But hey, there’s no truth to the engine reliability rumors. Classic.