MotoGP: Randy de Puniet & Davide Brivio Talk About Suzuki Racing Testing at Motegi

08/11/2013 @ 7:23 pm, by Jensen Beeler18 COMMENTS

MotoGP: Randy de Puniet & Davide Brivio Talk About Suzuki Racing Testing at Motegi randy de puniet motegi motogp suzuki racing 635x423

One of the great joys of private testing in the MotoGP class is the lack of media control and censorship placed upon the teams. We know that this seems like a backwards concept, but since Dorna can’t block teams from filming at the track, the private tests the MotoGP squads undertake are ever-becoming media and marketing opportunities, and our latest example comes from Motegi and the Suzuki Racing MotoGP effort.

Perhaps one of the most exciting projects in the MotoGP World Championship right now, Suzuki Racing’s bid to re-enter the premier class in 2015 has been eagerly awaited ever since the Japanese factory left Grand Prix racing at the end of the 2011 season.

Now publicly working its still unnamed race bike, with its inline-four engine and Randy de Puniet at the helm, Suzuki Racing has shown that the squad has the potential to run with the other factories, though still not within the restrictions of the upcoming MotoGP rules.

With a season and a half to go in that endeavor, fans are now getting the treat of watching Suzuki develop in real time. Queue the team videos from Motegi, where Davide Brivio talks about the results of the test, and hired gun Randy de Puniet explains the progress with Suzuki’s new chassis. 2015 can’t come soon enough.

Source: Suzuki Racing

Comment:

  1. TexusTim says:

    I really think it’s a shame there having to waiting till 2015.

  2. New Zealand Dan says:

    +1 Tim

  3. Jimbo says:

    This is great for the sport – the more factory teams the better!

    Just need to persuade Kawasaki to come back, Aprillia to go full factory, BMW to dip there toe in more than just providing the safety car!

    If Triumph want to get involved i wouldnt complain – imagine the noise of a 250hp Triple prototype engine!

  4. smiler says:

    The most insightful comment here “We know that this seems like a backwards concept, but since Dorna can’t block teams from filming at the track, the private tests the MotoGP squads undertake are ever-becoming media and marketing opportunities…..”

    I wish someone sensible would purchase Dorna and put the whole organisation straight. Richard Branson and the Flammini brothers spring to mind.

  5. MotoGP would be bankrupt by now if the Flammini brothers were in charge.

  6. pingpong says:

    puniet, who? champion? nop..how many podium he got?……………..

    i wonder why suzuki take him to ride the bike on 2015..

    waste money, time and efforts. suzuki seems not serious to grab back the championship..

    they’ve won long time ago, last with KR Jr..and never won since then..

    if they very serious to make comeback, they should hire the very talented rider, whatever it take they must get at least one rider..marquez, lorenzo, dovi,

  7. Bob says:

    It was such as shame when Suzuki stopped as the previous bike looked to be handling so beautifully with Alvaro Bautista on board. He seemed to be able to turn the bike so well and all it lacked was top speed. Hopefully the new bike will look as good around the corners and run rings around the Ducatis. Love the graphics too.

    Being a brit I would love to see Scott Redding on this bike in 2015.

  8. Jimbo says:

    To me the suzuki ride screams out as a potential retirement ride for Pedrosa in 2015 and a pontential back up if crutchlow exercises a ducatti get out clause.
    Alternatively there is a very talented Espagaro brother who is currently riding alot better than de Puniet in the CRTs who would probably relish it.

  9. JoeD says:

    More is better. Jimbo, good insight. There is the cost factor with the “smaller” factories but these are different times. Most teams are part of a corporate behemoth capable of supporting two entries. Does Triumph have the depth? Hmm, owner support group donations any one? Just thoughts before coffee.

  10. Jimbo says:

    @JoeD – i would certainly agree with you!! Wishful thinking on my part as a Triumph rider!

    All we can hope is that Suzuki come in 2015, sign an Alexis Espargaro, or a Redding, or a Pedrosa (looking for a challenge and a hand in development), as well as bringing a competitive Bike to the table and get some fairly good results. From this see discernable increase in sponsor revenues and hopefully a pick up in GSX-R sales.
    If that happens it will make Kawasaki take notice and possibly BMW too. I agree with you utterly on the costs comments and those two houses are probably the only two makers who could finanically support a team who arent already in it/going to be in it.
    Harder for BMW having turned their backs on WSB but a man can dream.
    If i think with my head i see the need for CRT teams in MotoGP, but my heart wishes that MotoGP was a class of Factory Prototypes where you could see the pinnicle of motorcycle design, with the best riders in the world. The more Factories the better.

  11. Norm G. says:

    re: “the private tests the MotoGP squads undertake are ever-becoming media and marketing opportunities, and our latest example comes from Motegi and the Suzuki Racing MotoGP effort.”

    and there it is. all the exposure, with a minimum of costs.

    re: “I really think it’s a shame there having to waiting till 2015.”

    not Suzuki, they think duping the gullible masses for yet another year is BRILLIANT…!

  12. Norm G. says:

    re: “MotoGP would be bankrupt by now if the Flammini brothers were in charge”

    i call BS. it was struggling under the FG group before they took it over in the early 90′s and got it to where it is today. 25 YEARS doesn’t past a CPA’s logic test. this means they had to have been doing something right.

  13. Norm G. says:

    re: “Just need to persuade Kawasaki to come back, Aprillia to go full factory, BMW to dip there toe in more than just providing the safety car! If Triumph want to get involved i wouldnt complain – imagine the noise of a 250hp Triple prototype engine!”

    look, i get it. living in reality is harsh. it’s difficult, but you guys HAVE to stop engaging in this “fantasy roadracing” nonsense. you’re only harming yourself. until such time WE come off the dime en masse for their product…? manufacturers like kawi and aprilia ain’t stepping up to the big show. tail wags the dog.

  14. TexusTim says:

    I wish suzuki was racing for the 2014 season.

  15. “puniet, who? champion? nop..how many podium he got?……………..”

    Maybe not a whole lot of podiums, but he did get 5 in the 250 class. The biggest reason why Suzuki hired him as a test rider is that he’s been riding in the series since 1998. He’s done tens of thousands of km of tests for all sorts of bikes/manufacturers over the years. That experience counts for one helluva lot.

    “i wonder why suzuki take him to ride the bike on 2015..”

    That hasn’t been agreed upon, as far as I know. For the moment, he’s just testing.

  16. tony says:

    i like rdp guys! he kinda seems like the euro nicky hayden…calls it like it is, doesn’t give too much of a shit about being pc…oh wait thats colin edwards…

    and hey norm g- shut the fuck up! let people dream, and stop being such a debbie downer ! after all, it worked for rocky balboa- i mean it worked for sylvester stalone! without dreams, where are we?

  17. Anvil says:

    Smiler, blaming Dorna entirely for the current state of MotoGP isn’t really accurate. The manufacturers are as much to blame as anyone, and probably moreso.

    Cost-cutting in MGP and SBK is necessary. I agree that how they’ve tried to get there is debatable but we’ve all got to accept that there isn’t money available to support unbridled spending.

    SBK has produced fantastic racing but has been headed for a financial crisis for years. It has become MotoGP-lite in many respects and, frankly, is not really true to the spirit of production racing anymore.

    Many years ago I had some involvement with racing teams and sponsorship and I can tell you the money was hard to come by then. Now it’s exponentially harder. Yet the required budgets to compete keep going up.

  18. irksome says:

    If you want more factories in MotoGP and racing in general, buy a new bike.

    The factories left because the global economy tanked in 2008 and let’s face it, bikes are a luxury purchase. When their bottom line increases, they’ll spend on THEIR luxury; racing.