Colin Edwards Will Retire from Racing after 2014 Season

Announcing his decision during the pre-event press conference for the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas, Colin Edwards told the assembled press that 2014 would be the Texan’s last season racing a motorcycle. Citing a lack of improvement on his performance in pre-season testing and at the Qatar GP, Edwards decision perhaps answers the lingering question in the paddock of when the American rider would hang-up his spurs after an illustrious career in AMA, WSBK and MotoGP. Talking about his inability to come to terms with the Forward Yamaha, which Aleix Espargaro was able to take to the front of the pack in Qatar, Edwards was at a loss when it came to understanding the Open Class machine and his lack of results.

MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

Photos of the Mugen Shinden Ni sans Fairings

Given the competitive nature of the electric racing realm, its rare to see the big high-power bikes without their fairings, as teams are reluctant to reveal their secret sauce. Debuting the Mugen Shinden San this past weekend in Tokyo though, Team Mugen did just that, giving us a glimpse into the inner workings of the team’s 2013 race bike, the Mugen Shinden Ni. You don’t have to be an electron-head to get excited by these photos, as any race bike with a carbon fiber frame and swingarm is pretty drool-worthy, though the Shinden Ni’s carbon fiber battery enclosure does hide a great deal of the electric superbike’s geek factor. While the sheer size of the battery bike is impressive, it was expected when the Shinden was first announced.

Mugen Shinden San (神電 参) Electric Superbike Revealed

Mugen’s third purpose-built electric superbike for the Isle of Man TT, the Mugen Shinden San, has been revealed in Japan. Campaigning two machines for this year’s TT Zero race, Mugen has John McGuiness and Bruce Anstey at the helm of its “Shinden San” bikes, as the duo looks for a one-two finish in this year’s race. With MotoCzysz not racing at the Isle of Man this year, Mugen is a hot favorite to take the top podium spots, as well as crack the 110 mph barrier for electrics on the historic Snaefell Mountain Course (Mugen is targeting a 115 mph lap). An evolution on the company’s previous designs, the Shinden San fits 134hp — 10hp more than last year, thanks to a new smaller three-phase brushless motor provided by Mission Motors — into its 529lbs bulk.

Trackside Tuesday: The Winning Personality of Jack Miller

Chatting with a couple of NASCAR fans recently, I was reminded that any competition is boring if you don’t care who wins. But if you do care, then even cars driving around in circles can be very compelling entertainment. Those NASCAR fans really cared about how their favorite drivers finished, and not only how they finished in the latest race, but what and how those drivers were doing off the track as well. Those fans had been captured by the personalities of those drivers. One of the things NASCAR does well is sell personalities. All major sports-related businesses do this to some extent, but some organizations do it better than others.

Living the Dream – A Photographer’s Story: Qatar

Imagine if just for once you didn’t have to stick to your usual nine-to-five job. Instead you were able to do the one job you’ve always wanted to do, but any number of things (it’s usually money) have stood in the way. This is exactly the situation I found myself in six months ago when the company I had worked at, for the last 14 years, decided to close, making everyone redundant. This decision did not come as a surprise; in fact, I had been hanging around for the last few years hoping that it would happen, as I had a plan. Fast-forward six months and I have just finished photographing the opening round of the 2014 MotoGP World Championship in Qatar. The plan is starting to unfold.

Honda RC213 V4 Street Bike to Cost $100,000+

11/18/2012 @ 9:41 am, by Jensen Beeler56 COMMENTS

Honda RC213 V4 Street Bike to Cost $100,000+ Honda RC30 cutaway drawing 635x423

After years of failed rumors about a V5-powered Honda street bike, this year we finally got confirmation that a true MotoGP-inspired machine would become available to the general public. The yet unnamed machine, which many are calling the Honda RC213, will have a 1,000cc V4 motor that will be based off the Honda RC213V MotoGP race bike.

A homologation special that will be produced in just enough quantities to meet WSBK regulations, the Honda RC123 street bike is not to be confused with the production racer variant that will be coming to MotoGP in 2014. That bike, essentially an RC213V without the pneumatic valves, seamless gearbox, and other trick bits, will cost in the neighborhood of €1,000,000 to buy.

However, according to an interview by Costa Mouzouris on CMG Online (a good read, check it out), the V4 street bike will cost significantly less. Talking to Dave Hancock, Honda Motor Europe’s Head of Product Planning & Business Development, the MotoGP “inspired” street bike will run in the neighborhood of £70,000-£80,000 or $110,000 to $125,000.

A stiff price to pay for a motorcycle, but Honda seems certain that collectors and wealthy individuals will scoop up the limited edition motorcycle with plenty of enthusiasm. Sure to dominate in World Superbike, if the Japanese company chooses to go racing with it in the premier production class, In many ways the Honda RC213 street bike is the Japanese company’s nuclear option to the changing MotoGP landscape, which HRC recently has been fighting tooth and nail.

Upset with rules like the CRT class, spec-ECU, rev limits, etc., Honda has been in a staring contest with Dorna’s Carmelo Ezpeleta over the future of the series. Threatening to leave MotoGP if certain rules are implemented, Honda was said to be ready to pack up its toys and move into WSBK with renewed vigor.

A bike like the RC213 would be a game-changer in World Superbike, and its release is just as much a wet dream for two-wheeled gear heads as it is a warning shot to Dorna. With the RC213 street bike in its back pocket, Honda had a credible threat to use with Dorna in regards to leaving MotoGP — a move that would strand the premier class with only two OEMs, we might add.

The punch-back on that move however may be the recent news that Dorna will run both MotoGP and WSBK, which effectively gives Honda no quarter to run to. With Dorna controlling both series, a monopoly has been created at the top-level of international road racing, which means that any OEM wishing to race on an international level with its road bikes is going to have to do so at the mercy of the Spanish media company.

A thought like that could be the death knell for the Honda RC213 street bike project, but as of yet, the V4 superbike appears to be full-speed ahead. Two-wheeled politics at its finest, stay tuned moto fans.

Source: CMG Online

Comment:

  1. Jake F. says:

    Thank goodness! I was afraid it was going to be expensive.

  2. I think anyone who thought this motorcycle was going to be cheap was severely deluding themselves…

  3. VivaVerdi says:

    Last time I checked WSBK still required substantial production numbers of a street machine (used to be 1500, I think they raised the minimum recently) the “special” is based off (that’s what homologation specials are for). You can’t just make a handful of super special bikes off the MotoGP prototype and go racing with hem in WSBK.

  4. Current rule is 1,000 units. That’s still a lot of bikes to make though…

  5. VivaVerdi says:

    @Jensen

    No, that is no longer the rule – in fact, since 2010 the minimum number of production machines the racing bikes are (supposedly) based upon has been 2000:

    http://www.roadracingworld.com/news/article/?article=38524

    That’s why certain manufacturers (Ducati, Aprilia and now BMW with the HP4) work around the rule by making specials with premium components/engines and revisions to the chassis and swing arm. You still need a BASE to make the homologation, tho’ – so unless Honda is planning also a mass produced version of the new RC (or are insane enough to make 2000 $1k bikes :) ) I don’t see how a lot of the article makes any sense.

  6. dc4go says:

    $100k is a whole bunch of money for a street bike. Sure this Honda will be amazing and badass but at 100k expect very few buyers… Honda doesn’t have that niche factor most collectors are after… I may be wrong who knows what do u guys think???

  7. VivaVerdi says:

    Make that 2000 $100k bikes, of course… Where’s the edit button when you need it? ;)

  8. http://www.fim-live.com/fileadmin/alfresco/6510004_Anglais.pdf

    Appendix 1.2 (page 150): 125 units before homologation inspection, 500 by halfway through the year (June 30th) 1,000 by end of first year (December 31st), and 2,000 by the end of second year.

  9. Jake F. says:

    $100 million or $200 million in very, very niche bikes, either way that’s a gamble I can’t believe they’re willing to take.

  10. That’s retail, Honda’s costs on building this bike will be much less. One of the advantages of basing the machine off the MotoGP bike is some of the tooling for manufacturing has already been done.

    Also, factor in the marketing potential for such a machine, and what that brings to Honda in terms of a halo bike. For further reading: http://bit.ly/vYtWeY

  11. Tyler says:

    This just reminds me…

    I’m dreaming of another series of international racing. Without f*&*ing ridiculous rules and rule changes.

    Set a capacity and let it fly…

  12. L2C says:

    Ordered! (In my wildest dreams.)

  13. mchale2020 says:

    I think I’d rather take the money and give it to Keith Code and see if he could turn me into a WSBK level rider before I bought this ornament.

    However, it’s not a bad idea with all these new practical bikes Honda is making. Have this 100K bike in a showroom to gawk at and grab people’s interest surrounded by 5k bikes by the same manufacturer to get potential converts to sign on the dotted line for a cheap new motorcycle.

  14. I like Tyler’s thinking.

    Dorna has already screwed-up MotoGP, and now they’re in charge of WSBK too. More unanticipated (read: expensive), almost annual, rule changes for the manufacturers—oh joy. Think of how strong MotoGP would be today if they’d never gotten rid of the 990cc bikes in 2006. Suzuki and Kawasaki would probably still be there, and small teams like Kenny Roberts would still being buying engines from Honda, and running a damned good show. The grid would easily be 25 strong. And that’d be 25 bikes of near-equal ability–not CRT back-marker crap.

    Maybe Honda should just start their own league (they’ve got the $$), and invite the other manufacturers to join. The chassis specifications, engine size, rules (Rookie Rule anybody?) wouldn’t change on a whim like they do now (read: MotoGP/Carmen). I bet the other brands would gladly jump aboard a series where they know their R&D investment isn’t going to get shit-canned in 3 or 4 years because Carmen decides, “How ’bout we change the engine size to 800cc?”.

    Carmen can then scratch his head in bewilderment as he watches the factory tractor-trailers leaving his racetracks, bound for a series that doesn’t have his hand firmly holding its nutsack.

    Yep, I’m liking the sound of it.

  15. 76 says:

    ProudAmerican, Honda has already had their own series, its called MotoGP, Moto2, and if it werent for KTM Moto3. They have also just acquired the European Junior Cup with the 500 that will be the spec bike.

    Your dream is the reality, hows it been going?

  16. Mormont says:

    Obviously I could never afford such bike but would enjoy to see it made and raced. Watch Dorna change the homologation rule for 2014 to 10,000 production bikes sold or some other bullshit just so this bike can’t race.

  17. David says:

    Bah Humbug. Just another example of Honda spitting in the face of their motorcycle buying fans.

    I used to be a huge Honda guy. Not any more. And I rarely meet anyone who is a Honda fan anymore.

    KTM is much more in tune with making exciting motorcycles that inspire motorcycle enthusiast.

    I see orange motorcycles in my future.

  18. sportbiker929 says:

    Nice, a 2013/4 1000cc RC30

  19. JimmysawFinger says:

    HRC to go enduro racing if Dorna change WSBK?

  20. Silas says:

    Hmm, so Aprilia can make a racing V4 that is accessible and Honda can’t? I wonder just how wise it has been to keep throwing money at MotoGP? Honda hasn’t really figured out that ‘win on Sunday, sell on Monday’ only works if you’ve got something to sell. 6 year old litre bike and god knows how old 600 in 2013. Even if every single Honda rider won every single race in their respective championship, who the hell would buy their sports bikes? Or even worse, their 125 and 500cc bikes with fairing but cruiser handlebars. Seriously, who makes these decisions?

  21. Silas says:

    David, just read your post and thought, that’s it exactly. At first it was Honda people getting a little upset and still holding out for the Honda of old. A year or two went by and now it’s regressed to the point that people just don’t even care any more. This is a motorcycle company being ridden into irrelevance. A shame really.

  22. meatspin says:

    production specials are ok in my book even if they violate the spirit of superbike racing. I just hope honda makes a more pedestrian version for the rest of us.

  23. Kelso says:

    why can’t there be a race or racing league w/ very limited rules, basically race what you bring?

    use whatever combination of engine capacity, tires, etc. that you think will be the fastest bike around the track

    limit it to a couple races spread throughout the year

    in time, I’d love to see some electric bikes dueling with some petrol bikes

  24. “I’m dreaming of another series of international racing. Without f*&*ing ridiculous rules and rule changes.”

    Well, as much as everybody just LOVES to bitch-slap Dorna, the factories are the major players for creating the rules that have created the outrageously expensive domain that is MotoGP. Shuhei Nakamoto, for example, pushed INCREDIBLY HARD for the 5-motor limit in 2013 in order to give the factories “a challenge”.

    Everybody wants full grids and run-whatcha-brung prototypes that are all competitive. Yeah. Good luck with that. There comes a point when you’re going after thousandths of a second in lap time. And those thousandths are going to cost. Big Freakin’ Time. Cost/performance curves are exponential.

    Dorna surely has made some boo-boos, but the factories simply have to take the bulk of the blame for the state of the series.

  25. “@Closer2TheHedge: rcv123 in wsbk? Fair? http://t.co/oUeIESq1” Entirely fair if it meets homologation numbers. Nakamoto san says it won't.

  26. Honda is not Ducati, so if they expect to sell them to billionaires and billionaires, they better leave the Honda badge off. The same way the Japanese did with their car divisions, in order to get wealthy people to by them and pay three times what they were worth, it required luxury nameplates Acura and Lexus.

    Something fancy sounding like Lusitania, or the Agamemnon v4. Then they’ll put their money down, and park it in their living room to look at and be dusted by maid until the tires dry rot, the gas turns to varnish and they eventually get tired of looking at it and sell them off to club racers for a pittance 10 years later.

    How about a real v-4 repla-racer for less than $15,000, they could actually make money on those. Honda is not Toyota with unlimited assets, they need to make money. The whole point of winning races, is to sell bikes, and if their customer base in this department (males 18 to 34) can’t buy the bike they just saw win the race, they’ll go elsewhere where they can. Come on guys it’s called marketing 101.

  27. Tripps says:

    Hasn’t it been awhile since the Race on Sunday, Sell on Monday model actually worked?

  28. Mr.Truth says:

    Care factor..ZERO

    NOBODY buys expensive Jappers, they dont have any class

  29. dc4go says:

    I always wanted an exotic V4 and I bought one last year.. it’s called an Aprilia Rsv4 factory and I can’t get enough of it.. I really don’t see 1000 people paying $100k for a Honda.. I certainly wouldn’t..

  30. kostritzer says:

    I couldn’t give two shits that the Honda brand isn’t considered “exotic”, their technology and engineering is what makes their (special) bikes exotic. Unfortunately it doesn’t look like Honda gives two shits about their enthusiast fans anymore. I’d be the first in line to buy a new (relatively affordable) V4 supersport/superbike, but I won’t purchase another run of the mill inline 4 from Honda ever.

  31. wosi says:

    ProudAmerican: “Think of how strong MotoGP would be today if they’d never gotten rid of the 990cc bikes in 2006.”

    Yes, think..if as a manufacturer who really had the sport at heart, they had allowed last years bikes to be sold to race teams instead of going to the crusher.

    Dennis Noyes: Do you understand why spectators and journalists say that MotoGP is not as exciting as premier class racing was before?

    Shuei Nakamoto: I don’t know. Sorry, I am not interested in this.

    Says it all..

  32. MikeD says:

    I’ll take 10 to help improve the world wide economy. I can’t get rid of all this Money EVEN i f i burn it…I HATE BEING FILTHY RICH.

    Seriously………………………if is not something “anyone” can walk in and buy(LESS THAN $15,000) at the stealership im not even remotely interested.

    I already have a very reliable piece of butt ornament/sexual organ enhancer…is a one owner 2003 SV1000N (3942 miles at the time of sale)…and it only costed me $3,900…in 2009 Dollars.

    100K+ Bike ? STROKE MY EGO BABY ! Yeah, shove it where the Sun don’t shine, Honda. (^_^) Hehehe.

  33. sunstroke says:

    @ ProudAmerican

    I’m happy you’re proud to be an American, but if you want to do our country proud, stop claiming that Dorna changed the capacity from 990cc. The MSMA changed the regulations to 800cc, and they tightened the fuel restrictions. The MSMA are also responsible for the change to 20L in 2014. This three manufacturer format, with perpetual wins by Honda and Yamaha, is a continuation of what has been going on since the 1980s. This is exactly what the MSMA want.

    I agree with the people who claim the RC213V replica will not race in WSBK as long as the homologation quantity is 2,000 bikes.

  34. Mikaelkn says:

    I think most naysers are missing the point. The purpose of this special is so that one can simply take off the lights and be competitive out of the box. Unlike the Ducati Rs where you’ll have to spend extra for kits and parts just to keep up with rice burners at half the cost.

    Reminds me of the 500cc vtwin days before the v4s proved to be impossible to chase. But they gave privateers an edge over what was available to them at the time (roc or the elf? Lol memories).

    Is Honda selling this to an average Joe? IMO no. As someone has already mentioned hopefully Honda is generous enough to build and sell a medifore version for the rest of us smucks

  35. Gutterslob says:

    …and here I was expecting the next RC to cost (only) double the last production RC they made. =(

    As for the whole racing rules thing everyone is talking about, I’ll just repeat a comment I read on MCN. Let all the teams/manufacturers make whatever the hell they want, as long as the whole team + parts fit into the back of a single Ford Camper van.

  36. sicoy says:

    great sport bike but very expensive,,, $100.000 is not cheap… hikz…

  37. Jaybond says:

    Expect the new so-called RC123 V4 superbike to feature fire breathing 210-plus engine, a plethora of electronic gizmos plus nimble chassis , just to regain the top crown for the best superbike back to Japan!

  38. sburns2421 says:

    I think this preliminary information doesn’t quite pass the smell test. I don’t think we should assume everything is at face value. There are a few possibilities:

    1) The rules could be changed to reduce the minimum bikes. With Dorna in charge of both series, what would stop them from saying a manufacturer only has to build 100 bikes? If this significant rule change was cooked in the books already it would give a huge advantage to Honda for a couple of seasons as manufacturers currently have to design bikes to build thousands, not a handful. Honda would own 2014 and likely 2015 as others develop versions of the old homologation specials, but these days that bike would be closer to MotoGP than a street bike.

    2) The bike could be sold initially for the six-figure sum noted (maybe the first year), then the price for a more pedestrian version could be significantly less. Like as in a fraction of the cost. Or who knows, for that $100k, a team might get a significant amount of spares. But a “mass-produced” bike with slightly lower spec at $25k would probably sell in decent numbers in 2015 and beyond

    Final comment: If everything about the bike is true and Honda wants to sell what is in effect a MotoGP bike (with near MotoGP price) to race in WSBK, it is not in the spirit of the rules. They are also hypocrites, complaining about Aprilia back in 2009, but the RSV4 was “only” $21k. Ducati should then dust off the desmosedici and blow Honda into the weeds. I would guess a $100k D16RR would sell more than a $100k RCV. But the end effect would be a junior MotoGP series not really production-based on real streetbikes.

  39. Tim says:

    the new name about of Japan is the “RCV-1″, Honda’s sportsbike V4 for the masses

    http://www.naigai-p.co.jp/youngmachine/magazine/

  40. Dc4go says:

    To build a $100k bike just to go WSBK racing is legal but totally takes away the whole point of WSBK racing to begin with. Bike are suppose to be real production bikes intended for the public and not wealthy collectors. This kind of greedy nature by Honda has led MOTOGP to spiral out of control with hi-tech expensive bikes but the racing is suffering. Just when WSBK is getting better and better with awesome under $25k bikes (Pinagale, SR1000, Rsv4) something like this happens. Im sorry i like Honda but i think this is just a way of them flexing their muscle and telling Dorna FU!! Nothing wrong with that but what next $100k BMW’S , KAWASAKI’S, GSXR’S?????

  41. Saw that Tim. Young Machine isn’t exactly Japan’s most reputable source…

  42. Tim says:

    ahhh man, I thought I was Breaking News. :( LOL

  43. No worries, always appreciate the tips!

  44. Neil says:

    So much for us mere mortal motorcycle enthusiasts. I guess the days of the Honda Interceptor, the RC51, and the VF1000R are gone. I had hoped the powers of Honda would make a competitive motorcycle to compete with the HP4, the RSVR and others at a price that the working man could afford. Guess Ill just download the pictures and put on my PC……

  45. kostritzer says:

    30k RC30s and RC45s are starting to look like a bargain now!

  46. Julian Bond says:

    ISTR the NR750 was £35k and they sold every one they made. What should bother them though is whether this is enough to win in WSB. The Aprilia, Kawasaki and BMW race bikes are pretty damn good now. I don’t care how good the initial platform is, the championship is not a shoe-in.

  47. buellracerx says:

    “One of the advantages of basing the machine off the MotoGP bike is some of the tooling for manufacturing has already been done.”

    @Jensen – LOL tooling? what tooling? doubtful any of those mfg would drop millions on tooling any significant part of those bikes when:

    a) quantities are low
    b) rule changes dictate part changes
    c) R&D dictates part changes

    all that aside, this bike will be bada$$ – RC51 is one of my personal fave’s. Oh and nice catch on the rule for min. req’d volumes

  48. Interesting how the more rules that exist, the more convoluted the outcomes since all parties involved try to get around the rules.

    Spec-ECU, spec-tires, CRT, engine-size changes, top racers retiring at their peak, etc, ….acknowledging what is causing problems for fans and the sport is a great first step in improvement.

    Jensen – wouldn’t Honda still have some clout with this special bike even if Dorna owns both series? i.e. Moto GP with 2 prototype OEMs would be very scary for Dorna

  49. Ho Wo says:

    The point of his bike, my American friends, is simple; Honda will make it because they can. It will be something special I’m sure. They will sell them all, of course.

    Some of the comments make me think the average rider is taking the modern Honda for granted. Perspective required.

  50. Mugget says:

    I can’t believe that there is any doubt Honda would sell all their RC213 street bikes??! They would be the only manufacturer beside Ducati who has a “street legal MotoGP bike”. The Desmosedici RR has been my “ultimate bike of all time” since it was released, if Honda brings the goods with the 213 it will be even better than the Desmo.

  51. The more I look at this, the more I think it’s BS. A PR shot across the bow in response to the changes that Honda and others think are coming. I wouldn’t mind seeing Honda build a world beating bike, but not at the cost of their real production lines putting out a competitively priced top-tier sport bike.

    It looks like Honda wants to head off the plus $100,000 superbike battle looming on the horizon. Aprilia may have the best track orientated production bike, but BMW is selling their bikes at a significant loss, in their pursuit of racing and market dominance, why because they can afford to. Looks like Honda just upped the ante in the bike wars. No one knows what will happen in war, but if nothing else the things that get developed through R&D are sure to filter down to the 600 cc and L bike divisions that average people can actually afford sooner or later.

    So I say let them blow their vast capital reserves in an effort to put each other out of business, once they dry up their survival instincts will kick in and they’ll have to come back to selling competitive practical bikes for a marginal profit .

    If anybody understand the cost of war, it’s the Japanese, so let’s hope their bluff, assuming it is a bluff, can head off the mass carnage that is likely to ensue.

  52. johnno says:

    I reckon they wouldnt have any problems selling all the 100k bikes. People spent 100k on the ducati desmocedici, why not this? You can be sure of one thing though, they will cost less than the ducati does to service.

  53. luckybot says:

    I’ll take one if it flies.

  54. AGP says:

    Oh good – the mayor of Idiotsville has joined the discussion.

  55. aaron says:

    I’m a bit of a honda exotic fanboy (CBX, cb1100r, rc30, rc45, nr750) but I’m not sure what honda can do to make a modern v4 seem like it’s worth this kind of cash when I can have 4 of the 5 listed exotics in my garage for that much money. but the old V5 rumors? I’d have traded an organ and all my worldly possessions for one of those, just to hear that awesome noise they made…

  56. Gman says:

    Some valid arguments both ways….one point overlooked here is that They all might be $100 k if they don’t shut off the printing press. A ban on all electronic aids, and return to seat of pants pilots would be the real deal for WSBK.