AMA Pro Road Racing Modifies Classes & Rules for 2015

12/04/2013 @ 1:54 pm, by Jensen Beeler23 COMMENTS

AMA Pro Road Racing Modifies Classes & Rules for 2015 danny eslick michael jordan suzuki laguna seca 635x392

AMA Pro Racing  announced today that by 2015 it will overhaul the racing class structure and rules for the AMA Pro Road Racing series. The changes are designed to make America’s premier road racing series more cost-effective, and to bring AMA Pro Road Racing inline with other national and international racing divisions.

Perhaps the most important change to the racing structure, AMA Pro Racing says that the Superbike class will see incremental changes made to the technical rules package over the next two seasons “in the interest of rule commonality, performance parity, and cost containment.”

This likely means that AMA Pro Superbike will adopt rules similar to the rules progression seen in World Superbike, with EVO-spec bikes that more akin to Superstock series motorcycles being the mode du jour from 2015 and onward.

Most of the changes being made to AMA Road Racing occur in the middleweight category, with the Daytona SportBike class being merged into AMA Pro Supersport class for 2015. The Supersport class will also no longer be split between East and West divisions, instead becoming one singular racing series for the 2014 season.

The Harley-Davidson XR1200 racing class will remain on the schedule through 2015, but AMA Pro Racing says it is considering a small-displacement class, likely 250cc to 300cc, as a development series for AMA Pro Road Racing as well. Details beyond this on the small-displacement class do not exist, though it seems like a logical choice for AMA Pro Racing to make.

“These long-term, strategic moves have been planned with careful consideration and after many conversations with our motorcycle manufacturers, teams, riders and event promoters,” said Michael Gentry, Chief Operating Officer of AMA Pro Racing. “We feel that these changes will help us elevate the sport of professional motorcycle racing in North America to greater heights.”

Source: AMA Pro Racing; Photo: Michael Jordan Motorsports

Comment:

  1. TexusTim says:

    300 class, forget 250s… geez

  2. Buellbafett says:

    ‘Improved’ racing class structure won’t mean much without consistent television coverage.

  3. james h says:

    Its great that they are thinking with the bigger picture in mind. However, I really don’t see the point of the Harley series as HD doesn’t make that specific bike anymore & because there are better low cost race bike alternatives (i’m not harley hating as i am a harley owner). & while I do enjoy watching the AMA races in person at the Laguna Seca round, they really should relinquish paddock space to the WSS & Moto’s 2/3 if that is one of the reasons those classes don’t race there.

  4. Terry says:

    AMA still exist?

  5. JD says:

    which should inspire a new american manufacture, like Apple Motor Corp. the fastest lightest machines with superior design aesthetics and the ultimate computing technology and the best engineers available…and on and on

    sounds good at least in my dreams

  6. Jake says:

    Too little, too late.

  7. proudAmerican says:

    “These long-term, strategic moves have been planned with careful consideration and after many conversations with our motorcycle manufacturers, teams, riders and event promoters,” said Michael Gentry, Chief Operating Officer of AMA Pro Racing. “We feel that these changes will help us elevate the sport of professional motorcycle racing in North America to greater heights.”

    Blah, blah, blah. DMG put more energy into writing the words of that press release than they’ve actually spent during the last five years to make their racing series viable again.

    Hey DMG, can you please work as hard at getting television coverage back to your races?

  8. Bill says:

    Would be nice to see consolidated rules so you can race a bike in WSBK, switch tires run AMA, then run BSB. Right now BSB is the best show on 2 wheels.

  9. Pete says:

    Bill nailed it. Run all 3 production race series under one formula. Easy to move between series as a team and rider.

  10. Dc4go says:

    I’m with Bill please consolidate WSBK, BSB, and AMA rules package so we can see wildcards @ Laguna, Silverstone, Brands Hatch and ect.

  11. smiler says:

    The rest of the world needs help to stop the Spanish Armada in MotoGP and likely WSBK as well. So if the AMA can start supplying great riders like Edwards, Roberts and Hopper to the world stage then that can only be good.

    Imagine seeing Erik Buell in WSBK in the future.

  12. Steve says:

    AMA sold the racing division years ago…. to some group that has paid little attention to it since….

    In my opinion, American Roadracing is DEAD! There are only a handful of races scheduled for 2014 & who knows if any will be on TV…..

    I resigned my membership from the AMA after the Nobby Clark debacle… don’t need the AMA or want to support those clowns anymore! They can’t make up their minds if they are for helmets, against…. but when it comes to exhaust laws… which are already covered under “noise/nuisance laws”…the AMA advocates we “police” ourselves & support new, specific laws aimed at motorcycles…. they sound much more like the enemy to me!

    So…. the AMA or PRO Racing will not get any support from me until they make a lot of changes….

  13. Norm G. says:

    re: “Blah, blah, blah. DMG put more energy into writing the words of that press release than they’ve actually spent during the last five years to make their racing series viable again.”

    re: “Hey DMG, can you please work as hard at getting television coverage back to your races?”

    breaking news, we’re WAAAY past the knee-jerk behavior of pointing fingers. it stopped being about what THEY have to do about 5-8 years ago. when WE ultimately fail to support, what they do or don’t do is immaterial. so, one is either part of the solution…? or they are part of the problem.

    time has come for you to make a decision Mr. Anderson. (Rinehart voice)

  14. Norm G. says:

    re: “AMA Pro Racing says it is considering a small-displacement class, likely 250cc to 300cc, as a development series for AMA Pro Road Racing as well.”

    right then, hustle up. this idea’s been floated before. we’ve already been long at this at the club levels, CCS, WERA, OMRRA, WSMC, etc. it’s we come to know the name Garrett Gerloff.

    in absence of a domestic policy for tiered licensing…? this the best driver for sales (well best we’re gonna get anyway). this is manufacturer, dealer, Normstradamus approved.

  15. sideswipeasaurus says:

    A small cheap class of 300’s is a good move. The XR1200 series should have been killed long ago. If I can be terribly un-PC it’s like the special olympics. A contest cordoned off from regular competition so an uncompetitive group and their parents can have a trophy. Actually that’s really not fair. The special olympics has great merit and purpose. Harley road racing doesn’t. They haven’t had much of a clue there since Elvis was gyrating to young women by the truckload. AMA, look at the roadmap of SBK EVO, strike the FIM/Dorna letterhead off and put your own on and be done with it. As far as promotion and support you should have a team field trip to BSB.

  16. majortom says:

    XR 1200?! They don’t even make them any more. Lame. Where are the electric? Excellent idea for a light weight class.

  17. Singletrack says:

    Didn’t he really mean to say…” elevate the sport of professional motorcycle racing in North America from the lowest depths” ;)

  18. Singletrack says:

    A small displacement class is certainly needed as a support class during a day of racing. Young riders need to showcase their talents in front of the major teams.

    But it’s a double edged sword. As televised entertainment, small bikes can be a snooze fest. Slow bikes piloted by unknown riders won’t pull an audience – but the OEMs would want the TV coverage to justify a factory effort.

    If it’s left to club level racers or youths 16 or under (18?), it would be justified as a development series, that should be included within a weekend of national level races.

  19. proudAmerican says:

    NormG–

    Nice deflection, but WE stopped supporting AMA races because they became a farce…a comedic attempt to continue racing, but not actually spend the money necessary to keep it exciting.

    The factories were told they weren’t needed and rules were changed on a regular basis to benefit certain…ahem, Buell…manufacturers. Pace cars were endangering riders on open racetracks…and on and on and on. I have neither the time nor inclination to explain my stance to you in great detail.

    Read some of the other comments here. Apparently, I’m not the sole person in America who has given-up on the AMA’s ability to run a racing series.

    Feel free to be the head cheerleader for the AMA. You get my vote.

  20. Norm G. says:

    re: “Feel free to be the head cheerleader for the AMA. You get my vote.”

    ever notice, when an issue arises in the motorcycle industry, be it here or abroad (pick your topic), it’s always about what THEY have to do, and never about what YOU have to do…? you can set a watch on the kneejerk reactions of ZERO culpability. weird innit…?

    re: “Read some of the other comments here. Apparently, I’m not the sole person in America who has given-up on the AMA’s ability to run a racing series.”

    never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups – George Carlin (1937-2008)

  21. KSW says:

    Why 2015 rules announcements without a 2014 schedule. Contracts are signed or being signed at all levels including media coverage/photogs/pit crews etc…. 2014 Doesn’t look good for AMA unless you like WERA class racing under the AMA Pro banner. I don’t see what a sponsor gets out of AMA nor do they unless what they’re saying quietly isn’t what they’re telling AMA? Maybe they have told AMA and that is just another problem.

  22. sunstroke says:

    AMA is officially gone. EVO regulations require performance-balancing, just like the current Daytona Sportbike regulations. The tuning and performance levels of the machines are now in the hands of the sanctioning body, not the manufacturers and teams.

    RIP AMA Pro Racing, you are just 2-wheel Grand Am, a high speed reality TV program that no one watches