XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R

11/08/2013 @ 1:41 am, by Jensen Beeler20 COMMENTS

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 05 635x423

While the talk of the Valencian GP will be the on-track action between Marc Marquez and Jorge Lorenzo, the off-track chatter is about HRC’s open class race bike for private teams, the Honda RCV1000R. This is the machine that Nicky Hayden, Scott Redding, and Karel Abraham, with other riders expected to be added, hope will close the gap between factory and private teams.

Like its predecessor, the 2014 Honda RCV1000R uses a 999.5cc 90° V4 engine, and while there are many similarities between the two bikes, there are major differences as well. Specifically, the Honda RCV1000R uses conventional steel valve springs, instead of the Honda RC213V’s pneumatic valve springs; and a conventional gearbox, instead of the factory bike’s seamless gearbox design.

Still the RCV1000R is an impressive machine, and in the hands of Casey Stoner the bike lapped within 0.3 seconds as the RCV213V on the same tires. When shod with the CRT-spec Bridgestone rubber, Stoner was within 0.17 seconds of his factory bike lap time. What the will translate to on race day remains to be seen though.

Costing around €1,200,000 for the first season, and €500,000 for the upgrade package in the second season, teams are still paying quite a bit of coin for a GP bike, especially since HRC is barring them from making their own modifications to the engine. Still, the Honda RCV1000R is a much cheaper option to the satellite-spec RC213V. We just think it looks great — a bevy of high-resolution photos are after the jump.

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 16 635x407

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 02 635x422

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 03 635x423

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 04 635x422

XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 06 635x422

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XXX: 2014 Honda RCV1000R 2014 Honda RCV1000R MotoGP 10 635x422

Source: Honda

Comment:

  1. smiler says:

    Well it is certain that it will not be as fast as either the Factory or satelite bikes under any circumstances. Presumably it will form the basis of the new Blade and WSBK replacement as well. Good idea that.

  2. Your images nearly makes me lick my monitor…they’re just yummy as always :)

  3. shumy27 says:

    whooo….I’m horny..!! though its not as fast as rc213v :-)

  4. Shawn says:

    1.2 million, and you don’t even get a cover for your traction control wire? I wonder if that’s part of the 2nd season upgrade package? ;)

  5. JoeD says:

    Looks tasty but less than 100% competitive vs. full tilt factory machines. Prove me wrong, please.

  6. Sixty7 says:

    Pure filth…..

  7. Looter says:

    So HRC wil sell you the bike outright but the teams can’t fiddle around with the engine? I guess nothing beats the factory upgrades. But it would be neat to see independent tuners’ different takes on trying to eek out more hp. Cool bike nonetheless, hope it rubs off on Honda’s V4 superbike.

  8. Johnnymac says:

    Would be nice to get one of these to ride down the driveway to get my mail.

  9. n/a says:

    Shawn, that cable has a cover over it.

    This is the third time I’ve saved these pictures, removing old ones, saving new ones. Trying to find the highest resolution possible.

  10. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    Why not include the seamless gearbox and the pneumatic valves?

    If the answer is “then some other rider could beat our factory guy”–then the next answer should be: then hire THAT guy.

    However, if the name of the game is to advance your technology doesn’t it make better sense, especially from a lab-coat-scientific-standpoint, to put more bikes out there that have all the same tech and inovate from there using that as your starting point?

    The only aspect of the Ducati program that made a lot of sense to me was their idea to essentially run four factory bikes. Because of that idea they now can say with certainty their bike is crap. haha.

  11. Norm G. says:

    re: “So HRC wil sell you the bike outright but the teams can’t fiddle around with the engine?”

    not that you’d be able to out engineer HRC anyway, but that’s a good trick innit…? must be some kind of force field.

  12. Norm G. says:

    re: “However, if the name of the game is to advance your technology”

    well there you go. you have your answer. advancing one’s technology ISN’T the name of the game.

  13. Nice to see they’re still using a CBR400RR NC23 kill switch from ~1989

  14. Because kill switch technology has advanced greatly in the past 20 years or so…

  15. Ren-jr. says:

    Also interesting to note that the previously shown oval intake opening has been changed to one that mimmicks the factory bikes.

  16. Ed gray says:

    I do not see how they can enforce their engine mod ban, unless the upgrade includes an engine swap. If Honda is requiring the customers to service the engines with Honda I don’t really see how this differs from leasing.

    How many engines does it come with? If you are not allowed to open the engine, what happens if you have an engine failure. The rules give you a limited number of fresh engines. Hows this going to work?

  17. Gary says:

    And beautiful to the eye. Thank you Honda. (all others please take note)

  18. Jaybond says:

    Based on the info from Honda, the RCV1000R’s engine produced around 230+bhp @ 16,000 rpm. If indeed, the new Honda V4 Superbike is based on the Production GP machine, one should expect around 210+bhp for the street machine (detuned for longer engine reliability), that ‘s a potential of making the new Honda V4 Superbike the new king in the superbike category.

  19. Donovan says:

    Does anyone know if the €1.2mil price is for lease or do the teams take ownership of the bike?

  20. nick says:

    Apart from the valve springs and gearbox, it gets control software for the ecu. Full factory bikes get to write their own, and this is a crucial distinction. Dorna’s obsession with cost cutting at GP level just means you end up with two or even three races in one, as I suspect will be the case next year. They don’t understand that the fans want the best riders on the most competitive bikes fighting it out, no one cares about the rest of the field: as long as GP’s are competitive at the sharp end, it doesn’t matter if you have just ten bikes. Dorna could easily subsidise full fat protoypes for sat teams, not least at the expense of encouraging also rans. They should concentrate instead on cutting WSBK costs which would have the effect of making that series much closer to what is supposed to be – proddy racing. Fans love watching racers wrestle a close to stock machine around. On Dorna: http://bit.ly/HJ9tH0