Wherever You Want to Go, Part 3: Reinventing Mobility

02/18/2011 @ 9:24 am, by Jensen Beeler2 COMMENTS

Wherever You Want to Go, Part 3: Reinventing Mobility wherever you want to go bmw 635x310

In this third video of four (see Part 1 & 2 here), BMW sat down some experts to talk about how mobility will change in the future. It’s funny to hear the issues the different sides propose and talk about in regards to automobiles, as they’re the very same sort of subjects we’ve talked about on Asphalt & Rubber in regards to motorcycles.

Some of the key debates explored in Part 3 of the Wherever You Want to Go series include vehicles as purely a form transportation, the “three internets”, the rise of electric vehicles, and of course whether the future of mobility will be fun. There are valid points all around the table in this video, and almost all of it applies to the future of motorcycles (except maybe the automated land train thing…we don’t see that working for two-wheeled machines). Check it out after the jump, and chew on it over the long weekend.

Source: BMW

Comment:

  1. 76 says:

    Solving problems that dont exist cause we need something to do or sell, changing the means to meet the very same end, in all I’m down with the bigblock guy, lets just make sure we have some fun along the way.

  2. Tom says:

    There is no conflict here. Electric cars are appliances that people who live in large cities will need for their commute of daily drudgery. Boring electric cars that drive for you make perfect sense here. However, and this is where Leno and I are in perfect agreement, enthusiast cars will still exist, though in smaller numbers, and this is the ideal solution.

    Since more people are going to be into buying appliances, niche cars can be more focused and I see that as a wonderful thing. Think of the craft beer industry the same way. The majority of Americans buy Bud Light and its hard to imagine a more pathetic swill pretending to be beer. However, we also have craft breweries that cater to every taste out there. In fact, its the presence of the ubiquitous boring flavored water that is corporate beer that gave rise to the creation of craft beers. Everyone wins. The herd gets its cheap swill and aficionados get some rich complex flavors to sophisticated for the masses. It can be the same with cars and motorcycles.