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Nicky Hayden

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It was a somber occasion in Austin on Friday, as members of the grand prix paddock gathered in the press conference room to witness the announcement that the number 69 was going to be retired from use in the MotoGP Championship.

The event at the Hayden Hill later that day, just overlooking Turn 18 was a little bit more cheerful though, as friends, family, and well-wishers gathered for a photo around the emblazoned logo of the Kentucky Kid.

There was also the Repsol Honda RC211V race bike on display in the paddock – the machine that Hayden used to win the 2006 MotoGP Championship – along with no shortage of fans sporting Nicky’s apparel, number, and infectious smile.

However you spent the day at the Circuit of the Americas on Friday, thoughts of Nicky Hayden were surely nearby.

Here is a chance to own a very special motorcycle. It is one thing when a World Superbike racing machine comes up for sale, because you know that it will be dripping with all the right parts, and have a pedigree to match.

But, it is an entirely different thing when the bike was raced by a rider as loved as Nicky Hayden still is by his legion of fans.

Put those two things together, and you have today’s opportunity, which is Nicky Hayden’s 2017 Ten-Kate spec Honda CBR1000RR SP2 WorldSBK race bike. The ultimate collectors bike, you will need €95.000 in your bank account to make it your own.

For sale from Ten Kate itself, the machine has matching chassis and engine numbers, matching ECU and electronics numbers, and is a matching chassis build-up. The bike is set to the exact specification that Nicky Haden used on the track.

The full build list is as follows:

  • π™€π™£π™œπ™žπ™£π™š: TKR / Cosworth engine kit
  • π™€π™‘π™šπ™˜π™©π™§π™€π™£π™žπ™˜π™¨: Cosworth package with TKR fly-by-wire system*
  • π™Žπ™ͺ𝙨π™₯π™šπ™£π™¨π™žπ™€π™£: Γ–hlins WSBK spec
  • π˜½π™§π™–π™ π™žπ™£π™œ: Nissin WSBK spec calipers & Yutaka discs
  • π˜Ύπ™π™–π™¨π™¨π™žπ™¨: Aluminium braced
  • π™Žπ™¬π™žπ™£π™œπ™–π™§π™’: TKR / GPMS (Hayden spec)
  • π™’π™π™šπ™šπ™‘π™¨: Marchesini
  • 𝙀𝙭𝙝𝙖π™ͺ𝙨𝙩: Akrapovic WSBK spec

*The full electronic package on this bike is developed and built in-house in collaboration with Cosworth, the special TKR fly-by-wire system is also developed and built in-house.

Ten Kate lists the bike as in “absolute showroom state” though the machine is a runner, and ready for track duty, should you so desire. The Dutch racing outfit will also issue a certificate of authenticy with the sale of the Honda, and it will come with a full package and parts sold by Ten-Kate Racing

For more info on the bike please contact Kervin Bos at Ten Kate Racing: k.bos@tenkateracing.com.

Photos: Β© 2019 Peter Jager / Motorshoot.nl – All Rights Reserved

There is perhaps no greater tribute in sports than the retiring of an athlete’s number, and that honor will be put upon the late Nicky Hayden at this year’s Grand Prix of the Americas in Austin, Texas.

As such, the iconic number for the Kentucky Kid will forever be his, as no other grand prix racer will be allowed to run the number “69” on their race bikes in competition after the event.

The move is a continuing tribute to Hayden, who tragically passed away in 2017 during a cycling accident.

Nicky Hayden was made a “MotoGP Legend” (the sport’s version of a Hall of Fame) in 2015, and last year the Circuit of the Americas named Turn 18 “Hayden Hill” in his honor.

Nicky Hayden will always be remembered as a legend in American motorcycling, especially after his 2006 MotoGP World Championship title and his 2002 AMA Superbike title.

But now, that status has been made official, as the Kentucky Kid has been inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. 

Hayden was one six inductees this weekend into the Hall of Fame, and was joined by off-road racer Terry Cunningham, stuntman Gary Davis, race tuner Skip Eaken, flat-track racer Clifford “Corky” Keener, and female racer Mary McGee.

It has been over a year since we had to report the passing of Nicky Hayden. Struck by a car outside of the Misano circuit, while he was training on his bicycle, Hayden’s death was felt around the world.

Though always in our hearts, the motorcycle industry has begun to move on from the loss of its beloved world champion, but the legal proceedings in Italy have nevertheless been toiling away.

There are two matters before the Italian courts. One, the criminal proceedings for the unnamed driver of the car that struck and killed Hayden; and two, a civil suit by the Hayden family against the car’s driver.

Now, the initial criminal proceedings of the incident have concluded, with the Italian court finding the driver of the car guilty of homicide.

An exhibition of Nicky Hayden photographs, by the Italian photographer Mirco Lazzari, opened during the Imola WorldSBK round, aptly named “A Million Dollar Smile”.

With 69 photographs depicting the American’s international career, it provided a reminder to fans of what made the Kentucky Kid so popular.

For Lazzari, the challenge of finding the correct pictures was a trying time ,with weeks spent to ensure he struck the right chord, as the first anniversary of Hayden’s death approaches.

“I wanted to create an exhibition for Nicky, and it was very emotional because Nicky was a rider that gave all of us a lot of emotions,” said Lazzari. β€œHe meant a lot to so many fans and to the sport, so I wanted to do this exhibition because he is missed by so many people.”

Nicky Hayden’s hometown of Owensboro, Kentucky is gearing up to honor its local hero, with plans to erect a statue of the Kentucky Kid on the front lawn of the Owensboro Convention Center.

The statue will capture one of Hayden’s most memorable moments, and one of the most iconic images of the MotoGP Legend – his race win at Laguna Seca from the 2006 MotoGP Championship season (shown above).

Just like in the photo, the bronze statue of Hayden will include him holding an actual American flag. And in addition to the statue, the City of Owensboro is also declaring June 9th Nicky Hayden, a reference to Nicky’s racing number: 69.

The motorcycling world once again descended upon Austin, Texas, as motorcycle road racing came to the Circuit of the Americas and the custom bike community arrived in droves for the Handbuilt Show.

This article will give you a flavor of what went on at the racetrack, while a second article will cover the Handbuilt.

As always, the Circuit of the Americas put on a great show. The facility is truly world-class and it made for a great weekend of racing.

MotoGP in Austin, Texas for the Americas GP will notice a giant “69” at the base of the iconic COTA tower, as the turn at the bottom of the mound has been renamed “Hayden Hill” in commemoration of the late American racer, Nicky Hayden.

Turn 18 is a fast right-hander, in a triple-corner complex of turns, which is known both for its speed and its rear-wheel slides. The first corner of the Circuit of the Americas to be given a proper name, it is a fitting tribute for the former MotoGP World Champion.

The MotoGP paddock this weekend has seen no shortage of tributes to the Kentucky Kid, including Ducati displaying Hayden’s Desmosedici GP race bike in the paddock area. He is surely missed by all.

Nicky Hayden may have left us, but he is not forgotten, and now the World Champion will have a permanent memorial in Misano, Italy, as the city pays tribute to the American rider as well.

Accordingly, the Council of Misano is planning to create the “Giardino Nicky Hayden”, which will be a garden near the intersection where Hayden’s fateful crash occurred, not far from the Misano World Circuit, at corner of via Ca’ Raffaelli and via Tavoleto.

The memorial garden will be built by Denis Pazzaglini, friend and former mechanic to Hayden, during his time in the Repsol Honda MotoGP team.

The garden is expected to open later this year on May 22nd, to commemorate the one-year anniversary of losing Hayden during his bicycling incident involving another vehicle.

2017 has been a strange year in motorcycle racing. We have had one of the best ever seasons of racing in MotoGP, with close finishes and a surprise title challenger.

We have seen one of the best ever WorldSBK riders stamp his authority on the series, though that has also seen the championship suffer partly as a result.

We have seen young talent come through in the support classes, and older talent recognized and appreciated. There has been much to celebrate.

But there has also been much to mourn. 2017 saw two of the most iconic names in motorcycle racing lose their lives, ironically, both in traffic accidents and not on motorcycles.

Nicky Hayden was killed while out training on his bicycle, hit by a car as he crossed a road at a treacherous crossroads. Angel Nieto suffered head injuries when he was hit by a car while out riding a quad bike on Ibiza.