As had been trailed since the start of this year, Triumph have finally been announced as the official engine supplier to the Moto2 class from 2019 onwards.

The deal with Dorna will see Triumph supply a specially modified version of the 765cc triple, which powers their new Street Triple range of production bikes.

The engine has been modified to produce more power and torque, and to be a little narrower. A modified cylinder head and inlet and exhaust ports provide better breathing, titanium valves and stiffer springs allow the engine to rev more freely, and make it more reliable under braking.

A higher first gear replaces the normal street ratio, and the use of a race alternator and racing clutch make the covers narrower. The engine will produce 133hp and 59 lbs•ft of torque in the first instance.

The objective of engine development has been especially on reliability and durability, rather than outright horsepower. As the engine is one element the Moto2 teams cannot touch, they place a very high stock in the fact that they know the engines will finish races without blowing up or breaking down. 

The Moto2 engine has already been tested by Julian Simon at the Motorland Aragon circult last week.

It was tested in a special Moto2 chassis built by Triumph, though Paul Stroud, Chief Commercial Officer for Triumph Motorcycles, ruled out an official Moto2 entry by Triumph, saying that it was very much against the spirit of the class. 

Engines will be made available to the Moto2 chassis manufacturers very soon, so they can get on with the work of designing the chassis to be used in 2019. Alex Baumgärtel of Kalex said that he expected work to start later in the year, with the first tests to happen at the end of 2017. 

Triumph’s rationale for racing in Moto2 is very much an exercise in branding. The additional exposure which being official Moto2 engine supplier brings is a huge boost to the Triumph brand, bringing exposure in important growing overseas markets.

The Triumph branding in Moto2 will feature more prominently than with current supplier Honda, each bike having a sticker on the fairing, and on the shoulder of each rider.

Source: MotoGP

This article was originally published on MotoMatters, and is republished here on Asphalt & Rubber with permission by the author.