Moto3 Coming to Replace 125GP in 2012?

06/01/2010 @ 12:17 pm, by Jensen Beeler14 COMMENTS

Moto3 Coming to Replace 125GP in 2012? Moto3 replacment 125GP 635x453

MCN is reporting that the days of 125GP may be numbered as Dorna and the FIM get ready to replace the small displacement GP series with what’s being called the new Moto3 race class. Drawing from the formula found in Moto2, Moto3 features prototype bikes with 250cc four-stroke single-cylinder motors. However instead of a single-spec motor rule, as found in Moto2, Moto3 appears to be open to multiple engine manufacturers.

Allegedly the new series is designed to bring some teams out of the crowded Moto2 class, where 40 bikes can be found on the starting grid, and put them into the lower racing class where they would be more competitive. This also serves the double purpose of bolstering the entry-level GP racing series ranks, as some teams have jumped ship to Moto2 for the added exposure and relatively lower costs.

Adding more fuel to the fire is the rumor that Honda has already been testing what could be a Moto3 prototype. Said to have been taking laps around Motegi, Honda has supposedly wedged its 250cc thumper into an RS125 chassis. The result has been a lap time that’s 1.5 seconds faster than 125GP bike.

If rumors are to be believed, the new Moto3 race series could be seen by 2012, as MotoGP gets set to change its racing format back to 1000cc displacements.

Source: MCN

Comment:

  1. Ceolwulf says:

    OK, we’re definitely going to need street replicas of those.

  2. This could be interesting although I would have preferred a 450 single class. Maybe we will see Ducati get back to the glory 250 Desmo single days!!

    http://www.ducatinewstoday.com/2009/11/wallpaper-wednesday-1965-ducati-250-mach-1/

  3. monkeyfumi says:

    What a surprise! Honda is behind the death of the last two-stroke class.

  4. Cru Jones says:

    “Adding more fuel to the fire is the rumor that Honda has already been testing what could be a Moto3 prototype. Said to have been taking laps around Motegi, Honda has supposedly wedged its 250cc thumper into an RS125 chassis. The result has been a lap time that’s 1.5 seconds faster than 125GP bike.”

    I think find that paragraph is probably incorrect. I bet you meant a 300cc thumper. I have yet to see a Moriwaki or hopped up CRF250 that can lap faster than a proper RS125R, let alone 1.5 seconds faster.

  5. @Cru Jones

    It won’t be a production based engine. But a 4-stroke of double the capacity can easily out pace a 2-stroke of half the size (just look at a 990 MotoGP vs. 500GP). Most estimates say that 2-strokes make about 30% more power than a 4-stroke for any given capacity).

  6. Jaybond says:

    The 250cc prototype 4 stroke engine should’nt be astronomical in terms of cost, to be developed, which is why the Moto3 will be open to any engine manufacturers. Now that’s interesting.

  7. Kevin White says:

    I think it’s more than 30% more power. Of course you have a lot of other factors at play here. But 250cc GP bikes made 95 HP, while 600cc Supersports are around 145 HP (both at the wheel). S0 the two stroke is at 380 HP/liter while the four stroke is at 242 HP/liter, which gives you about 57% more per liter.

    For dichotomy, 1000cc, 500cc, and 250cc would have been nice. Or 800/400/200.

    Looks like it’ll be 1000cc (in 2012), 600cc, and 250cc instead.

  8. Moto3 Coming to Replace 125GP in 2012? – http://aspha.lt/11q #motorcycle

  9. Bjorn says:

    I think a rule specifying carburetters, points and stator plate ignitions might push things in an interesting direction. Imagine that; not even a battery or ignitor box, let alone an ECU. It wont happen, but I still like the idea of extreme simplicity.

  10. Jaybond says:

    Twin cylinder 250cc 4 stroke should be good.

  11. @Kevin your example isn’t a very good one because 600 supersport bikes aren’t in anywhere near the state of tube as a GP 250. The 30% figure I mentioned is for any given number of cylinders and bore and stroke etc.. As an example the original 990 MotoGP bikes had about 50% more power than the 500s despite being twice the capacity (500×1.3=650, 650 x 1.5 = 975 so it roughly works out)

  12. Kevin White says:

    NSR500 was around 200 HP or 400 HP/liter, RC211V was around 250 HP or 253 HP/liter — a 58% difference between two and four stroke GP engines.

    RC212V (800cc) is around 207 HP or 259 HP/liter, still a 54% difference in power per displacement.

    800/400/200 would have been the proper counterparts to the old 500/250/125s if they were going for roughly equal total power output — 1.6x the displacement.

  13. BikePilot says:

    A heavily modded 250cc four stroke single MX engine can make quite a lot of power and over a wider spread than a 125cc single two stroke can manage. I wouldn’t be surprised if a worked-over 2010 CRF250R powered (stock displacement) bike would lap faster than a RS125. I’m personally partial to two strokes, but at least in MX the 250cc fours have a significant advantage over the 125cc two strokes. From a manufacturing and R&D standpoint it makes sense given that two stroke 125s are essentially out of production and zillions of 250cc four strokes (mostly in MX bikes) are produced every year. The biggest drawback of the four strokes imho are cost (both purchase and upkeep) and noise.

  14. FROE says:

    When this all started back when 500cc two-stroke where being pushed out ( Inevitable Thanks to the tree hugger) it was a shame! Not much changed in the field for what factory or teams or riders would be at the top of the box. Seems then and now money was the key. That was not the case when MOTO2 came along. The field seemed to get very competitive and it was left up to the riders to fight it out. Not to say money is not a factor. So I would say having a spec motor in the Moto3 class would make it alot more interesting.