A 2WD Hybrid-Electric Motorcycle for the US Military?

In the coming years, US special forces may be riding a tw0-wheel drive, hybrid-electric, multi-fuel motorcycle co-developed by BRD Motorcycles and Logos Technologies. Helping make this project possible is a Small Business Innovation Research grant from DARPA. The goal is to make a single-track vehicle for US expeditionary and special forces that will be nearly silent in operation, yet also capable of traveling long distances. Details on the proposed machine are light, of course, but it sounds like the 2WD dirt bike will be based off the BRD RedShift MX (shown above), and use an electric drivetrain, as well as a multi-fuel internal combustion engine to achieve its goals.

Colin Edwards Will Retire from Racing after 2014 Season

Announcing his decision during the pre-event press conference for the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas, Colin Edwards told the assembled press that 2014 would be the Texan’s last season racing a motorcycle. Citing a lack of improvement on his performance in pre-season testing and at the Qatar GP, Edwards decision perhaps answers the lingering question in the paddock of when the American rider would hang-up his spurs after an illustrious career in AMA, WSBK and MotoGP. Talking about his inability to come to terms with the Forward Yamaha, which Aleix Espargaro was able to take to the front of the pack in Qatar, Edwards was at a loss when it came to understanding the Open Class machine and his lack of results.

MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

Photos of the Mugen Shinden Ni sans Fairings

Given the competitive nature of the electric racing realm, its rare to see the big high-power bikes without their fairings, as teams are reluctant to reveal their secret sauce. Debuting the Mugen Shinden San this past weekend in Tokyo though, Team Mugen did just that, giving us a glimpse into the inner workings of the team’s 2013 race bike, the Mugen Shinden Ni. You don’t have to be an electron-head to get excited by these photos, as any race bike with a carbon fiber frame and swingarm is pretty drool-worthy, though the Shinden Ni’s carbon fiber battery enclosure does hide a great deal of the electric superbike’s geek factor. While the sheer size of the battery bike is impressive, it was expected when the Shinden was first announced.

Mugen Shinden San (神電 参) Electric Superbike Revealed

Mugen’s third purpose-built electric superbike for the Isle of Man TT, the Mugen Shinden San, has been revealed in Japan. Campaigning two machines for this year’s TT Zero race, Mugen has John McGuiness and Bruce Anstey at the helm of its “Shinden San” bikes, as the duo looks for a one-two finish in this year’s race. With MotoCzysz not racing at the Isle of Man this year, Mugen is a hot favorite to take the top podium spots, as well as crack the 110 mph barrier for electrics on the historic Snaefell Mountain Course (Mugen is targeting a 115 mph lap). An evolution on the company’s previous designs, the Shinden San fits 134hp — 10hp more than last year, thanks to a new smaller three-phase brushless motor provided by Mission Motors — into its 529lbs bulk.

Trackside Tuesday: The Winning Personality of Jack Miller

Chatting with a couple of NASCAR fans recently, I was reminded that any competition is boring if you don’t care who wins. But if you do care, then even cars driving around in circles can be very compelling entertainment. Those NASCAR fans really cared about how their favorite drivers finished, and not only how they finished in the latest race, but what and how those drivers were doing off the track as well. Those fans had been captured by the personalities of those drivers. One of the things NASCAR does well is sell personalities. All major sports-related businesses do this to some extent, but some organizations do it better than others.

MotoGP: Saturday at Jerez Round Up: Of Fresh Excitement and Fallen Heroes

04/28/2012 @ 10:03 pm, by David Emmett5 COMMENTS

MotoGP: Saturday at Jerez Round Up: Of Fresh Excitement and Fallen Heroes 2012 Spanish GP Jerez Saturday Scott Jones 141

Writing about MotoGP is hard at the moment. There are so many great stories to tell – the astonishing rise of Romano Fenati out of nowhere in Moto3, the legion of Kalexes taking on Marc Marquez in Moto2, the frenetic pace of development among the CRT machines, the ascendancy of Dani Pedrosa as a challenger for Jorge Lorenzo and Casey Stoner, the rebirth of Cal Crutchlow as a serious force to be reckoned with, the HRC design gaffe that left the RC213V seriously afflicted by chatter, just to name a few – but it is hard to get around to telling them. Because the vast majority of fans only want to read about one single subject: the enigma of Valentino Rossi’s continuing battle with the Ducati Desmosedici, and his fall from championship contender to mid-pack straggler.

Each race adds another chapter to the epic saga that Rossi’s problems have become, and the weekend of the Spanish Grand Prix is no exception. It is a tale that needs to be told, however tiresome it may have become to some, and I shall return to later on. But first, we have three fascinating sessions of qualifying which need attention.

The weather is still a key player at Jerez, the rain slowly dying out after lunchtime, leaving different conditions for all three classes. For Moto3, it was pretty much wet, and for Moto2, it was just about completely dry, with MotoGP once again left to suffer in between. Fortunately, the track was drying quickly, with only a few damp patches right at the very end.

Moto3 was dominated by two young Australians, Jack Miller seemingly having a secure hold on pole for most of the session, and former Red Bull Rookie Arthur Sissis, who was close. In the end it was another rookie who took the pole, young Spaniard Alex Rins grabbing the top spot with a last-ditch lap. Sandro Cortese and Miguel Oliveira complete the front row, but like Moto2 before it, Moto3 has thrown up a host of new names, previously consigned to riding uncompetitive bikes. Alexis Masbou rarely set the world on fire on a 125, yet he starts from 4th on the grid on Sunday. Likewise, Louis Rossi, once a shambolic backmarker, is now regularly at the sharp end.

Rins’ pole was down to choosing the right strategy, fitting slicks and timing his lap just perfectly, also helped by his extensive local knowledge. Rins’ experience from racing in the Spanish Championship means he knows Jerez well, and without a new track to learn, the Spaniard excelled. Rins may have been helped a little by the shortcomings of the two title favorites, Maverick Vinales and Romano Fenati. Vinales elected not to use a slick tire, choosing safety over speed with an eye to the title chase, ending up in 9th, just ahead of Fenati.

Moto2 saw a tense battle between Spanish heroes Marc Marquez and Pol Espargaro, with Takaaki Nakagami, Thomas Luthi and a reborn Mika Kallio adding a little variety to the mix. The clash between Marquez and Espargaro is shaping up to be a classic confrontation between the Golden Boy and the Wild Outsider, in the vein of Wayne Rainey vs Kevin Schwantz some twenty years ago. Marc Marquez is Spain’s anointed champion – and rightly so, the boy oozes talent from every pore – while Espargaro is just some kooky kid who happens to be really, really fast. Both men were new to the class last year, and while Marquez hit the ground running – helped, no doubt, by having almost unlimited testing, given the nearly unlimited budget of the team – Espargaro took a while to find his feet. But once he understood how a 600cc four-stroke works, his results improved massively, and the switch to the Kalex has been the missing link. Marquez is clearly the favorite for the race tomorrow, but pleasingly, the list of challengers is getting longer, ensuring that Moto2 retains its title as the closest racing series in the world.

But the MotoGP qualifying session turned out to be heart-stopping, and an example of why an ordinary 60 minute QP can be just as exciting as any other qualifying format. The excitement was helped along by the weather, with the track drying fast throughout the session, with a few remaining wet patches adding to the tension. There were two such patches at Turn 1 which caught several riders out, including Casey Stoner and Alvaro Bautista. The reason for that, Ben Spies explained, was because both of them were on the ideal line, and riding around them was made extremely difficult.

The wet patches made things even harder for Casey Stoner at Jerez. The Spanish track is one that the Australian has never liked, and has never had a good race at, but adding insult to injury was the fact that while the wet patches on the racing line were drying out as riders used them, Stoner’s less orthodox style means his lines are different, leaving him to deal with track that was still wet. The reigning champion believed that had he taken more risks, he could have cut another half a second off his times, but while that would have put him on the front row, the other half a second he is missing needs setup work to achieve.

Cal Crutchlow helped liven qualifying up, the Monster Tech 3 Yamaha riding proving that his 4th at Qatar was not just a one-off. The Englishman went back and forward with Casey Stoner and Dani Pedrosa for the lead, but once Pedrosa and Jorge Lorenzo started ratcheting up the pace, Crutchlow had to let them go. If the weather conditions permitted it, he told reporters, he would be gambling rather than playing it safe. He knows he is not in the title race, and so would rather crash out of the lead than ride around in 6th collecting points.

But the real battle for tomorrow’s race will the same one that unfolded during qualifying, with Jorge Lorenzo just getting the better of Dani Pedrosa at the last minute. Every time he passed his pit board, Lorenzo said, he saw Pedrosa’s name in 1st, and a small gap for him to close. He crossed the line and saw a better time on his lap timer, but by the time he got back round again, Pedrosa would be back in the lead again. In the end, Lorenzo came out on top, but in reality, there is nothing to choose between the two.

His strength has been a confidence booster for Lorenzo, but it is Dani Pedrosa who looks capable of upsetting the apple cart. With all the talk preseason – at least, all the talk that wasn’t about Ducati – of the battle between Casey Stoner and Jorge Lorenzo, it is Pedrosa who has come out looking stronger and faster than he has ever done since moving to MotoGP. Pedrosa is riding with more aggression than in previous years, aggression he readily demonstrated in Qatar. Where for the last couple of years, Pedrosa has not been able to put up much of a fight, expect Lorenzo to have his hands full with his compatriot. The 2012 Spanish Grand Prix has all the marks of being a classic, with the added bonus of seeing two Spaniards fighting for victory in front of a home crowd. Only the weather may dampen proceedings.

Which brings us to Ducati, via the front row of the grid. For the first time in a very long time, there is a Ducati on the front row. But it is the Ducati of Nicky Hayden, rather than that of Valentino Rossi, which will start from 3rd spot. After yesterday’s euphoria, with Rossi posting the 2nd fastest time in the wet, the Italian was brought back down to earth with a thump. A thump hard enough to put a massive dent in his confidence, and perhaps harm his increasingly fragile mental state.

Nicky Hayden, meanwhile, is getting on and riding the Ducati, and not worrying about what is wrong or right with it. Though Hayden described the bike as “the Ducati with the most potential I’ve ever ridden,” it is far from perfect. But Hayden grits his teeth, puts his head down and finds a way to use the rear to work his way around the problems the bike is having at the front. Hayden’s podium is well-deserved, for finding a way to ride the bike, and for his team and crew chief Juan Martinez finding a setup that works for the American.

And that is where Valentino Rossi is falling short. Rossi simply cannot ride the bike, and his crew, led by the legendary Jeremy Burgess, simply cannot find a setup for him that allows him to ride it. Rossi had tried Hayden’s setup, but the Italian cannot replicate Hayden’s style, which allows the American to get to full lean much quicker without running wide. Rossi is losing too much time right there, in the transition from braking to full lean, and his crew has not been able to find a solution to it.

The problems for Burgess & Co., according to Rossi, are the same as those of Rossi himself. They have all spent plenty of time on different bikes, and learning how to get the best from those different bikes, but it turns out that the difference between those bikes was not as great as they thought. The style of bike – the design philosophy and direction, if you will – was more or less the same, so lessons learned on one bike could be adapted to the next bike with very little difficulty. The same could not be said for the Ducati: it required a completely different mindset, and left both Rossi and his crew quite bewildered.

The situation is starting to wear Rossi down, and was probably made worse rather than better by the Italian’s promising time in the wet on Friday. Going from 2nd and thoughts of a podium to 13th on the grid, last of the Ducatis and stuck behind a CRT bike is a blow to Rossi’s confidence that should not be underestimated. Rossi’s demeanor at his daily press briefing was flatter than usual, the spirit slowly draining from him with each passing debrief to talk about how he still can’t ride the bike.

His situation isn’t helped by the barbs being aimed by other riders, with Casey Stoner pointing to the performance of Nicky Hayden and opining that the problem was not just down to the bike. Even Jorge Lorenzo, when asked if he would object to Rossi being given a Yamaha to ride, said that it would be good for Yamaha to have “another fast rider” to keep the brand competitive. “Another fast rider” is quite a comedown for the man so many refer to as the greatest of all time.

There is no easy way out of this situation. Different power characteristics would help, but what is really needed is a narrow angle V. Rumors that the engine might make an appearance at Estoril are being scuppered here in Jerez, the talk now being of Le Mans, Barcelona, or even much later in the year. For any top sports person to perform to the maximum of their ability, Rossi said, they had to find enjoyment in what they do, and much of that enjoyment comes from being able to compete at a top level. That enjoyment is gone for the Italian. Without it, even Estoril seems a very, very long way away.

What will Rossi do? That is impossible to say. For the moment, all he can do is either suffer miserably at the back, or override the bike in an attempt to do a little better than 5th. For Rossi’s sake, he would do better to choose the path that brings him most enjoyment. Otherwise, we may have already seen the best of the Italian.

The final and undeniable sign that decline has set in will be when he is turned upon by the Italian press. So far, they have sided with Rossi against Ducati. When I asked one Italian journalist when the Italian press would start to write Rossi off, his answer was simple: “Never. He puts bread on the table for too many journalists.” If he keeps finishing outside the top 10, that might start to change.

Photo: © 2012 Scott Jones / Scott Jones Photography – All Rights Reserved

This article was originally published on MotoMatters, and is republished here on Asphalt & Rubber with permission by the author.

Comment:

  1. Brandon says:

    I would rather not hear about Rossi unless he is on the podium. Don’t care about riders or companies that aren’t progressing

  2. Another story not mentioned above is the setup of Ben Spies’ bike and his frustrating challenges compared to his teammate.

    A narrow angle v-engine has not been done by Ducati. Which would take longer?: resolving the front-end and power delivery of the existing chassis & motor or starting with a motor design they’ve never done before?

  3. Adam says:

    I don’t buy into the argument that Ducati ” doesn’t have experience” and “it will take some time” when it comes to a twin spar chassis and redesigning an engine. it come down to are they willing to change their heritage to win. Duacti has years of development with yes a twin spar steel trellis frame… you know the one on every bike they have ever made. they pointed out last year that there was no difference between a carbon frame and aluminum. so then the argument of no experience doesn’t hold water. “engineering guru Preziosi” not having experience with this design is ludicrist. if he is in fact such a genius then Rossi should be wining every race on Preziosi rocket ship. as for the engine there was a modification to it this year was there not? and they seem to have a handle on providing more then enough power as it should be a relatively easy thing for the guru to design should it not?

    what it really comes down to is the rider. it is Rossi’s fault he is out on a nice Sunday ride every race weekend he has most defiantly lost confidence and a willingness to push. Just look at Barbaras pass at Qatar, they way Rossi went off track does not remind me of his last race in Japan for Yamaha or his race at Laguna in 08. he has lost hart and needs a big weekend to get it back but unfortunately I don’t see this happening this year… but at least he is a head of Ben! lol.

    Well that is my rant for the day. :)

  4. Jane says:

    @Adam – that could be one of the most over-simplified comments on the subject. It ignores any metallurgical differences of steel trellis vs. aluminum under the forces of a GP track. It is also incorrect. Ducati has never made a twin spar aluminum frame, “you know”, not one production bike in the modern era (even the base Panigale does not use a twin spar frame).

    All you need is, “you know”, power from the engine, right? The Yamaha R1 that Rossi could not win on until they developed the cross-plane crank shaft, you know, had nothing to do with power delivery.

    That said, I can see how witnessing a good friend killed right in front of you because he lost the front could want you to make sure the front-end on your own bike is solid before putting it to the limit

  5. Adam says:

    Jane, I was being cynical as a frustrated fan of Rossi. and my engine comment now that I read it back was worded wrong; what I meant was that they have more then enough power they should be able to produce a different engine and not worry about power. if Rossi wants less, meaning they obviously know how to design strong engines and have room play with designs.

    yes with the exception of the Panigale that does not use a twin spar. However the 749 that is in my garage at home dose (steel trellis) so there is knowledge through SBK racing on that subject all be it not aluminum. but you could also say Ducati doesn’t have much experience with aluminum delta box frames as they only used carbon fiber in MotoGP. but the Panigale uses aluminum. so they do understand how aluminum behaves. I find it interesting how they could take knowledge learned from using carbon in GP and translate it to aluminum for SBK. Would it not be feasible to think the same way with a steel to aluminum twin spar?

    perhaps my digs at Preziosi came off sounding bad as most rants do when written down. there is a tid bit on another site that someone posted from AMCN. with comments from Rossi about how Preziosi wasn’t listening to him and couldn’t understand why he wanted less power. there seems to be a disconnect between rider and engineer, which doesn’t make a wining formula. And on top of that Nicky has shown promise and is praising the bike that Rossi can’t ride the way he wants, also not good for Rossi.

    To clarify Yamaha brought Rossi several versions of M1 for him to test when he first went to Yamaha. at the first test he had, he chose the cross plane engine and won the first race on a Yamaha. then went on to win the championship. and last year before Malaysia he wasn’t exactly lighting up the time sheets. Yes that incident would have an ever lasting effect on anyone.

    there is more going on behind the scene then even the journalist know, I think the majority of what is going on in Ducati behind closed doors will never be aired any time soon. I am only speculating like everyone else.

    thanks for your comment. :)