Buell Firebolt XB12R Concept by Holographic Hammer

12/30/2013 @ 4:26 pm, by Jensen Beeler14 COMMENTS

Buell Firebolt XB12R Concept by Holographic Hammer buell firebolt xr12 holographic hammer

It’s funny that we should come across Holographic Hammer’s concept renderings of a reworked Buell Firebolt XB12R at the end of the year, because the work is perhaps the most intriguing we have seen in 2013.

More of cult classic than big hit, the Buell Firebolt XB12R was never honestly considered an appealing machine in terms of design and function, though the two-wheeler has found a special place in the hearts of Buellisti around the world.

Featuring the typical gimmicks innovations of Erik Buell’s tenure at Harley-Davidson, things like the Firebolt’s in-frame fuel tank and underslung exhaust create some interesting freedoms for designers to work with visually.

While many Buell customs have come across our desk, we think the work done by Holographic Hammer, the work of love by BMW Motorrad designer Sylvain Berneron, is the only one to really embrace the opportunity that Buell’s create.

Part modern sport bike, part retro machine…we’re not sure if that describes your typical Buell motorcycle or the work here, yet it’s intriguing to see how stark of a contrast can come from the statement. Naked or faired, take your pick.

If you’re picking up what he’s putting down, you can follow Holographic Hammer on Facebook. We just did.

Buell Firebolt XB12R Concept by Holographic Hammer buell firebolt xr12 holographic hammer concept

Comment:

  1. jimmyjohn says:

    I like the naked one better.

  2. Say what you want, Buell’s ideas were ahead (depending on your perspective) of the times. Simplicity coupled with a touch of technology and a plethora of originality breathing new life into old concepts (to me) is what bike building was and still is all about.
    I love the Buells particularly the XB series as they were such a departure from the status quo in terms of offerings. Most people didn’t get it .. but anyone who loves motorbikes certainly did. It’s a timeless frame design and worth every bit of attention and Ducati ever garnered.

  3. smiler says:

    Just so glad that Buell survived his time with the leather joy boys from the chrome and cast iron factory. To be racing in wSBK next year is even better.

    Nice to see some great custom Buell bikes too.

  4. k1200Rider says:

    I think option B is close to feasible. If we can find a place to house the battery and electricals.. Been following Holographic Hammer for a while now.. Some very cool concepts. .

  5. Andrey says:

    Under slung exhaust, fuel in frame and rim mounted front brake disc are not even slightly “gimmicky” and are smart interpretations made by a very clever person. I am not a Buell fan but the strike through should have been a delete.

  6. starmag says:

    Andrey says:
    December 31, 2013 at 7:09 AM

    Under slung exhaust, fuel in frame and rim mounted front brake disc are not even slightly “gimmicky” and are smart interpretations made by a very clever person. I am not a Buell fan but the strike through should have been a delete.

    +1

  7. ML says:

    I really REALLY like this. I’ll take option A with the subframe/airbox cover from option B.

    As for the “gimmicky” remark, I read it as Jensen taking a stab at those who would consider those features gimmicky.

    Anyway, did I mention that I really REALLY like this? Cause I do!

  8. Jonathan says:

    Incredible. Just incredible. Build it and I will buy it. This I swear.

  9. crshnbrn says:

    Andrey says:

    “Under slung exhaust, fuel in frame and rim mounted front brake disc are not even slightly ‘gimmicky’ and are smart interpretations made by a very clever person.” “the strike through should have been a delete.”

    +1

    Not to nitpick, but the statement should have been, “Featuring the innovations typical of Erik Buell’s tenure at Harley-Davidson.”, as there is nothing typical about something that is an innovation.

  10. crshnbrn says:

    k1200Rider says:

    “I think option B is close to feasible. If we can find a place to house the battery and electricals..”

    I also noticed there is no space available for the battery on either design, and design A doesn’t have any space for the electrics. If the tail of design B was a little bigger, it could house the battery, and the electrics could be tucked inside the fairing. Design B has the potential to be a conversion kit.

  11. bobx67 says:

    not gimmicky.

    bikes look good.

  12. Quiet American says:

    I like it way better than the recently shown alliance between the Confederacy and Apartheid.

  13. Looks cool, and given that it has a real suspension, and proper reliable dule front brakes, it may actually be a bit more than a coffee table motorcycle… but I tend to doubt it given what they started with.

    And comparing Buell to a Ducati, is laughable. Ducati’s work, they have the performance envelope that no Buell branded bike could match on its best day. Take a Ducati into a 150 mph sweeper, and you have a 99.97 chance of survival, if you have even basic competency on a motorcycle. Try that with a Buell, assuming it could even reach 150 mph, and your survival chances drop to about 64%, at best. Personally those are not the kind of odds I would ever embrace, nor would any serious sport bike rider.

    As to innovations, I’ll grant you that an under slung exhaust may be slightly more practical and lighter weight, but they certainly don’t sound very good, I’ll take an under the seat dual exhaust 1098 system any day over one of those under slung ankle burning speedbump buster. No thanks. :)

    Now maybe EBR will change all that, it it remains to be seen, but given the history, I certainly wouldn’t be willing to bet my life on it.

  14. crshnbrn says:

    ^
    For the sake of discussion, lets pretend the approach to the sweeper you mention is not only downhill but also in line with the prevailing wind direction to improve the Buell XB12′s chances of achieving 150 MPH. The flip (no pun intended) side of a 64% chance of survival of negotiating the sweeper at 150 MPH means there is a 36% chance of failure. Reduced to its lowest common denominator, that is a failure rate of 9 out of 25 attempts. I also would not embrace those odds, but apparently 9 riders did. God rest their souls.
    The Ducati’s 99.97% chance of survival of negotiating the sweeper at 150 MPH equates to a failure rate of approximately 1 out of 3000 attempts. If we can agree that humans are not perfect, we could just chalk up that one instance out of 3000 as a result of the rider becoming complacent after making so many successful attempts and missing the braking point, thereby making the Ducati perfect, at least in this particular scenario.