Yamaha YZF-R25 Launched Confirmed for May 20th

05/09/2014 @ 8:14 pm, by Jensen Beeler22 COMMENTS

Yamaha YZF R25 Launched Confirmed for May 20th yamaha yzf r25 teaser 635x362

Yamaha Indonesia has spilled the beans on when the Yamaha YZF-R25 will be available, and that date is just a few days away: May 20th.

Yamaha is pitching the Indonesian-built, 250cc, parallel-twin sport bike as a miniature Yamaha YZR-M1, thus making a link between the R25 to Yamaha’s MotoGP racing program — a smart move considering how wildly popular MotoGP is in Indonesia currently.

To help promote the debut in Indonesia, Yamaha has launched the “I Want Yamaha R25″ website, which beyond the May 20th timeline, is also promising early purchasers an VR46-themed AGV “premium” helmet.

In emerging markets like Thailand and Indonesia, the Yamaha YZF-R25 will be a major purchase for motorcyclists, but in North America and Europe, where the 300cc YZF-R3 is expected, the R25 platform will be target towards new riders.

It’s unlikely that either the R25 or R3 will completely live up to the M1 comparisons being made by Yamaha (or the aspirations of enthusiasts who remember the potent high-revving small-displacement machines from Japanese OEMs a few decades ago), though the bike should give both the Kawasaki Ninja 300 and KTM RC200/RC390 a good run for their money.

Pricing will be key of course, and with all the waiting and anticipation that’s been built up to this launch point, enthusiasts are expecting a potent package from Yamaha. Hopefully the tuning fork brand doesn’t disappoint. Stay tuned A&R readers.

Source: Yamaha Indonesia

Comment:

  1. Ian john says:

    Conventional forks it seems, not as potent…..

  2. BBQdog says:

    As see a yellow number on the M1. The global marketing value of Lorenzo seems to be non existing.

  3. L2C says:

    “As see a yellow number on the M1. The global marketing value of Lorenzo seems to be non existing.”

    Valentino Rossi’s global brand recognition is simply greater than any MotoGP rider in history. That’s all there is to it.

  4. David says:

    “….enthusiasts are expecting a potent package from Yamaha.”

    Potent? We are talking about a 250cc bike are we not?

    I guess I’m just out of the loop (old fashioned) and still consider 250cc bikes to be beginner bikes.

    Must be the new world of motorcycles though.

    Not much in the way of open class bikes to get excited about anymore.

    How about we just do away with the big bikes in MotoGp and make Moto3 the top class. This would solve the tire problems.

  5. travo says:

    I’ll take a minty fresh RD250 over the new blue plastic bike. Until they make HP I am out.

  6. Marmoot says:

    Ah, some riders dismissing the smaller cc bikes as “learner only” :)
    I have a ducati 1199s panigale that I had fun with on the road and track. In road trim with road tyres, it got close enough to national racers on their racebikes.
    Last week I just bought a CBR400RR 1995. That is an old bike with smaller cc, three times less power, small tyres, conventional fork, no abs/tc/qs, but 10x cheaper and 4x times cheaper to run,
    On the road it turned out slightly more complicated to ride, but as fast, as quick, and as fun as the panigale when scrapping knees on the ground.
    On the track, obviously it is slower than panigale, although only by a few seconds. But I am not there to win races. Is it as quick? Yep. Is it as fun? You bet! And it is cheaper to run!
    I am definitely waiting for [a second-hand devalued] R25 with eagerness :D

  7. crshnbrn says:

    re: “As see a yellow number on the M1.”

    Yes, and it is a “4″ and not a “9″.

  8. a tom says:

    Marmoot: Unfortunately, as Jensen referenced in the post, the 15k+ RPM, light-weight IL4 pocket rockets have been phased out since the later 1990s / early-2000s, and the R25 will never live up to the expectations you have basis those bikes.

    The R25 may not even produce 30bhp, and forget about the 40+ that the older 250s used to give. The know-how to build those bikes is obviously still there, but doing so is unfortunately cost-prohibitive to companies, particularly when compared to the larger 600 / 1000cc sportsbikes.

    Even more, since this has been developed for Thailand / Indonesia / India, rather than the European or India market, the seating position will likely be a lot closer to that of a R15 or a Kwaker Ninja ZZR-250 ‘sportsbike’ instead of that from a R1 / R6 and even the R125 from Europe.

    It will likely be a step-up from a lot of what people in such countries currently ride, so that’s a positive for this bike.

    Unfortunately, the 250 ‘sportbike’ market is fairly crowded with Kwaki / Honda / KTM options available, not forgetting the larger 300 / 400 and even 500 options (still cheap alternatives to real supersports). They had a decent window of opportunity when the ‘R4′ rumours surfaced in 2008; now, guess we’ll see.

  9. Marmoot says:

    A tom: al I am saying is that people should not be too quick to dismiss small cc bikes as ‘not having potential’. Track days etc is not always about power and stratospheric rpm range. Having a cheap bike with good (ok…”ok”) looks, and some modern technology (fuel injection, etc) can be a good cost-effective startig point for aspiring track warrior.
    Have a look at youtube somewhere a video of kawasaki 250 twin running past Yamaha R1 around laguna seca.
    With that look, if R25 peice is economical enough, I’d hit it!

  10. Shinigami says:

    If you spend any time in places like Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam- or even central Tokyo or Osaka- you will quickly realize that a 250 IS a relatively “potent” option – in a world of mostly 50 and 125 cc scooters and bikes.

    It’s all relative.

  11. taikebo says:

    Conventional forks it seems, not as potent…..

    It’s for cost cutting. It’s build for Asia. Yeah, I’d like to see R25 with aluminum deltabox frame, aluminum swing arm and inverted front suspension too. Some sources say this bike will cost $4500 in Indonesia. But don’t worry, Yamaha will provide the racing parts of R25 like inverted front suspension

  12. taikebo says:

    As see a yellow number on the M1. The global marketing value of Lorenzo seems to be non existing.

    Here in my country, if you ask people who are not MotoGP fans or who can’t ride motorcycle, they know who Valentino Rossi is… A big enough name if I can tell. Perhaps because Vale sometime appears in a TV ad and often come to my country

  13. a tom says:

    Marmoot: I don’t totally disagree with what you’re saying, but you clearly pointed to one of the crazy IL4′s of the 1990s. I was trying to reiterate that this bike will likely not approach that bar.

    I do have to wonder though… what defines a sportsbike these days? Just having fairings on the bike with clip-ons? Is the R15 a sportsbike, particularly when compared to the R125?

    Shinigami: I know, I live in SEA, albiet Singapore, and I said the same as you did – it will be a step up, going from something like a Wave, RXZ, 135LC, as well as from the R15s which have showed up.

    Central Tokyo on the other hand… what I remember (from 10+ years ago) is it was more about the scooters than motorcycles (& sportsbikes)… those and the crazy Pizza-la riders on their 3-wheeler delivery bikes.

  14. Marmoot says:

    A tom: all good. I was specifically alluding to David’s comment (4th from top).

  15. “Central Tokyo on the other hand… what I remember (from 10+ years ago) is it was more about the scooters than motorcycles (& sportsbikes)… those and the crazy Pizza-la riders on their 3-wheeler delivery bikes.”

    Absolutely. Scooters are ubiquitous here. That said, the 250cc segment is immensely important in Japan. It is the highest displacement for the base license and these bikes are not subject to the ‘shaken’ vehicle inspections that the 400cc-and-up bikes face. That places them in a nice price/performance/TCO niche.

  16. T says:

    The yzf 125 has a upside down fork and built in Italy and has been built for many years. I think the yzf 300 should be equipped with a upside down too. Do us a favor and do it.

  17. Mike says:

    David says:
    May 10, 2014 at 6:57 AM

    “….enthusiasts are expecting a potent package from Yamaha.”
    Potent? We are talking about a 250cc bike are we not?

    You need to have raced 125′s/ 250′s etc to appreciate the class

    Even now take a look at Moto3 for some of the best GP racing
    Also take note those in Moto3 are single cylinder 250′s
    Yet look at their lap times compared to the 600′s even on tracks with long straights
    You might be impressed

  18. David says:

    I didn’t know this was a track bike. For some reason I was thinking it was a street bike.

    Here in the USA the traffic moves at 70 to 80 MPH. You need a bike that has the power to get you out of trouble. Not just keep up.

    I can see how a 250 would be fun on a track or maybe out on country roads. But here on the interstates…..just not big enough.

  19. Mike says:

    David says:
    May 12, 2014 at 12:53 PM
    “I didn’t know this was a track bike. For some reason I was thinking it was a street bike.”

    Sorry I did not mean to imply it was a track bike as it is in fact a street bike.
    But 250-300 sized bikes are fine there too & most of the new bikes do a 100mph without much fuss

    But your right that they are more suited/fun on twisty roads & not really the bike of choice for interstates

    But on a nice twisty road they are very fun to ride & have more than enough umff :)

  20. BBQdog says:

    “But 250-300 sized bikes are fine there too & most of the new bikes do a 100mph without much fuss”

    Without much fuss. 160 kmh ?? Maybe the 300′s, andthen only flat on them with the wind in the back.
    I owned both the CBR205r and the Ninja 250r and 145 kmh would be more realistic.

  21. mike says:

    BBQdog says:
    May 13, 2014 at 10:43 PM
    Without much fuss. 160 kmh ?? Maybe the 300′s, and then only flat on them with the wind in the back.
    I owned both the CBR205r and the Ninja 250r and 145 kmh would be more realistic.

    The new 300 ninja does 180-190kph

    I still have a 2013 250 which was only released here in a Asia as a Special Edition interim model before the 300 released here
    It Does 160 kph right after grabbing 6th gear…meaning not getting to 6th & waiting a minute to build speed or anything no tuck & 170 tucked

    I Dont know about the older carb’ed 250′s never owned one if that is the one your describing