MV Agusta F3 800 Ago Now Officially Debuts

We already announced the bike last November, and brought you a bevy of hi-res images of the special edition machine. Although now that we think of it, MV Agusta never released anything on this Giacomo Agostini tribute motorcycle — better late than never, right? Back at the EICMA show launch, where the MV Agusta F3 800 Ago was first shown to the public (and Agostini himself), the Varese brand promised us two additional motorcycle launches in early 2014. MV Agsuta made good on half that promise with the Dragster 800 model, hopefully this Ago special edition isn’t the other half of that statement, and MV Agusta still has something waiting in the wings. That being said, the Tricolore & Gold paint scheme is gorgeous, and looks even better in person.

Isle of Man TT Gets TV Deal for Australia & USA

Want to watch the Isle of Man TT from the comfort of your non-British TV, but haven’t been able to in the past? A new TV from the Isle of Man’s Department of Economic Development will do just that. Inking a new TV contract with North One TV, the Isle of Man TT will be televised in the American, Australian, and of course British markets, making it easier than ever to watch the iconic road race. With a five-year contract with the Velocity Channel in the US, the American cable channel will show seven one-hour race shows. Each segment will air within 24hrs of each race, and be tailored for the American market.

Castiglioni Denies Fiat Buyout of MV Agusta Is in the Works

After reporting 22% growth in Q1 2014, Giovanni Castiglioni had some closing words about the rumors that Fiat could acquire MV Agusta — a popular rumor that has been swirling around in the press the last two months. Denying outright that MV Agusta had, or was in, talks with the Fiat-Chrysler group about an acquisition (some reports linked even MV Agusta to being bought by Fiat-owned Ferrari), Castiglioni said the Italian company solely was focused on building growth, and building motorcycles. “Moreover, I’d like to take this opportunity to deny rumours circulated by the media over the last few days concerning supposed negotiations vis-à-vis the sale of a share of MV Agusta to the Fiat-Chrysler Group,” said Giovanni Castiglioni, the President and CEO of MV Agusta.

A 2WD Hybrid-Electric Motorcycle for the US Military?

In the coming years, US special forces may be riding a tw0-wheel drive, hybrid-electric, multi-fuel motorcycle co-developed by BRD Motorcycles and Logos Technologies. Helping make this project possible is a Small Business Innovation Research grant from DARPA. The goal is to make a single-track vehicle for US expeditionary and special forces that will be nearly silent in operation, yet also capable of traveling long distances. Details on the proposed machine are light, of course, but it sounds like the 2WD dirt bike will be based off the BRD RedShift MX (shown above), and use an electric drivetrain, as well as a multi-fuel internal combustion engine to achieve its goals.

Colin Edwards Will Retire from Racing after 2014 Season

Announcing his decision during the pre-event press conference for the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas, Colin Edwards told the assembled press that 2014 would be the Texan’s last season racing a motorcycle. Citing a lack of improvement on his performance in pre-season testing and at the Qatar GP, Edwards decision perhaps answers the lingering question in the paddock of when the American rider would hang-up his spurs after an illustrious career in AMA, WSBK and MotoGP. Talking about his inability to come to terms with the Forward Yamaha, which Aleix Espargaro was able to take to the front of the pack in Qatar, Edwards was at a loss when it came to understanding the Open Class machine and his lack of results.

MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

2012 MV Agusta F4 RR Official Details & Photos

05/10/2011 @ 11:53 am, by Jensen Beeler13 COMMENTS

2012 MV Agusta F4 RR Official Details & Photos 2012 MV Agusta F4 RR 5 635x423

After teasing us last week with a video of the new 2012 MV Agusta F4 RR, the Italian company has come out and released official details and photos of the 198hp superbike. Using a shorter-stroke Corsacorta motor, MV Agusta has been able to coax more top-end speed and power from the iconic F4 design. Expected to go on sale in Italy later this month, the F4 RR is carrying with it roughly a 20% premium over the base F4, and will cost €22,900 in that market.

Highlights of the new MV Agusta F4 RR:

  • New short-stroke radial valve engine 198 hp at 13,400 rpm
  • New increased bore diameter
  • New primary drive
  • New cylinder head
  • New large-diameter titanium intake and exhaust valves
  • New lightweight forged pistons in “aerospace RR alloy”
  • New exhaust 4-2-1-4
  • Close ratio gearbox
  • Variable length intake runners
  • Öhlins multi-adjustable 43 mm fork
  • Öhlins TTX 36 rear shock
  • Öhlins steering damper
  • Forged aluminum wheels

It should be noted that MV Agusta is translating a 201cv figure in some instances as 201hp, which some sites have confused as being 201hp. In fact the new 2011 MV Agusta F4 RR makes 198hp. Photos and press release after the jump.

RR, the magical acronym that immediately brings to mind the world of competition. The bike for special individuals who demand the most exhilarating riding experience. Created using the most exotic materials, ultra-sophisticated suspension and the new 1000cc short-stroke engine make the MV Agusta F4 RR the most advanced and powerful superbike in the world.

When the most sophisticated chassis design is joined with the new MV short stroke engine, the result can only be an extraordinary machine. The MV Agusta F4 RR is the perfect tool for riders who demand the utmost performance. Evolved, exotic, and even further refined, the F4 RR is currently the best that technology can offer to the motorcycling world. To already refined MV Agusta F4, you add even more exotic materials, reduced weight, and, above all, a 201 hp four-cylinder engine  which makes the F4 RR the most powerful superbike ever built. All “packaged” with the advanced design that makes the MV Agusta F4 RR unique and unmistakable.
A project for  those who demand the ultimate riding experience.

ENGINE: 201 Hp, PURE POWER
The new 4-cylinder short stroke engine with radial valve is the soul of the MV Agusta F4 RR. The engine is completely new and is inspired by MV Agusta’s experience in competition. Apart from the engine case castings, the arrangement of cylinders and a few other elements the 4 cylinder RR engine shares little with that of the previous F4. It has been completely redesigned with a single goal in mind: maximum performance. All new thermodynamics, a new crankshaft that has a reduced value of inertia and new bore and stroke dimensions with an extremely over-square relationship that can reach rpm’s worthy of a true racing motorcycle. The piston diameter has been increased from 76 to 79 mm while the stroke is reduced from 55 mm to 50.9 mm. With these dimensions the rpm limit has been raised to a stratospheric 13,700 rpm while at the same time reducing the linear velocity of the piston (from 24.7 m/s to 22.9 m/s) and thus also improving reliability.

To reach the stratospheric level of 201 hp at 13,400 rpm with a completely homologated engine including an exhaust system complete with the catalytic converter, extreme attention has been given to every detail. The thermodynamic efficiency has been optimized to guarantee a record level of performance. For this reason, the head of the F4 RR is completely new including new intake and exhaust tracts as well as large diameter intake and exhaust valves. For the first time on an MV mass production engine,  all the valves are made of titanium and this has made it possible to reduce the mass while at the same time significantly increasing the diameter (30 to 31.8 mm for the inlet and from 25 to 26 mm for the exhaust). The tuning of the engine has been optimized thanks to the use of a completely new 4-2-1-4 exhaust system with large diameter tapered headers. In addition to ensuring the optimized performance of the engine, this new exhaust system has a unique sound and is even more intoxicating.

The intake is controlled by four 49 mm throttle bodies with the unique TSS system of variable length intake tracts.

The new engine of the F4 RR has been designed according to the criterion of low friction. A new primary drive gear has drastically reduced the speed of the generator and water pump in effect limiting the parasitic power consumption of these components. As with previous F4’s, this new engine features a rapidly removable cassette gearbox and the clutch employs a mechanical slipper system to assure proper control even under the most extreme braking conditions. The electronic engine management has been further refined compared to that of the previous F4. The traction control follows new operating modes as well as two maps for the engine, and everything is now easily managed through the new controls that have been placed on the left handlebar.

CHASSIS: LIGHT AND PRECISE
The frame and swingarm are common with those of the already excellent F4, but the desire on the part of MV Agusta to offer a four-cylinder superbike has also led to the employment of some unique solutions. To optimize performance and adapt the F4 RR to all race tracks and conditions, the MV Agusta F4 RR allows a virtually infinite combination of adjustments. Multi-adjustable suspension, essential for a racing motorcycle, has been combined with the adjustable steering head angle (with interchangeable eccentrics) and the height of the swing arm pivot and rear axle by means of calibrated inserts.

SUSPENSION: THE BEST OF THE BEST
The Öhlins NIX upside-down front fork has 43 mm diameter inner tube and a titanium nitride coating to improve the smoothness and precision. This particular fork dimension has been designed to achieve the perfect balance of agility without sacrificing  the legendary stability of an MV.
As the most sophisticated motorcycles, the front wheel axle carriers are machined from billet aluminum and the front forks offer precise external adjustment of spring preload as well as compression and rebound damping.  Also, the fork of the MV Agusta F4 RR provides separate adjustments for the hydraulic damping (left leg compression, right leg extension), a solution that enables the accuracy of the hydraulic independence as varying the compression does not have an influence on the rebound.
The Öhlins Racing TTX 36 rear shock is simply the best in the world. Born from experience in competition, it is externally adjustable in spring preload, compression, rebound and length allowing you to vary the ride height of the rear of the bike to match the different driving styles and different circuits. In addition, the MV Agusta F4 RR also offers the possibility of adjusting the height of the swing arm pivot point by means of calibrated inserts.

RIMS
The quest for lighter weight and the best possible handling led to the creation of lightweight forged aluminum wheels that minimize un-sprung weight and reduced inertia with the advantage in the increased reactivity of the bike. The new wheels on the MV Agusta F4 RR allow a weight saving of 1 kg compared to the standard F4 cast versions.

BRAKES
The F4, the current reference in high performance braking, has only been exceeded by the new F4 RR. The Brembo monobloc calipers are the state of the art high performance brake calipers for motorcycles, and now, paired with Brembo radial master cylinders, the braking performance is on par with that of the top superbikes. The clutch master cylinder is the mirror image of the radial brake caliper which offers increased feel and modulation. Numerous other exclusive details, such as the levers and handlebars which are dedicated specifically to the MV F4 RR and subject to countless hours of testing and development all lead to the best possible ergonomics available on a production motorcycle.

COMPONENTS
A true superbike is not only defined by its potential performance, but also by the attention to detail with which it is made. F4 RR, the details speak for themselves. Never before has a race-ready superbike been built with such a high level of attention to detail. The design features are not only created to be visually pleasing, but, as form follows function and the F4RR has been designed to perform. For this reason, every detail has been considered to increase performance and functionality, reduce weight and increase the product quality fit and finish. The F4 RR debuts new adjustable light weight rear sets to match the ergonomics of the bike to the needs of the pilot. The remote control of the dashboard functions (including traction control) is just one of the details that the MV engineers have put into this new superbike. In addition, a new aerodynamic flap has been added under the lower triple clap to convey additional air to the radiator optimizing the aerodynamics and cooling of the engine’s record power.

MV SPECIAL PARTS TO PERSONALIZE YOUR MASTERPIECE
Exclusive technology and design has been imprinted into the DNA of the new F4 RR. It is the world’s most powerful superbike.  But, the evolution never ends. You can make your F4 RR even more unique with the original MV special parts that have been developed to provide you with additional performance using the very latest technical advancements in materials and design.

MV special parts are an absolute guarantee of quality for the customer as they have been subject to the same high standards of quality that have been applied to the original masterpiece using the most advanced materials such as aerospace alloy, titanium and carbon fiber. Special exhausts systems and racing engine ECU’s have also been developed that can increase even further the record power level of the 4 cylinder engine.

Accessories, such as MV Agusta clothing, can be viewed at www.mvagusta.it and a number of items may be purchased directly online.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLORS
The two new colors, pastel red/white and matt pearl white, together with the new graphics make the F4 RR even more unique.

Source: MV Agusta

Comment:

  1. Matt A says:

    The dry weight is listed over atHFL as 423 lbs…That’s quite a bit for a more modern liter bike (granted the last “redesign” of the F4 was really anything but). That’s quite a bit more than the 1198, ZX-10R, S1000RR and YZF-R1. I think it’s heavier than the GSXR-1000 as well but they list a curb weight without describing it, so I’m not sure if that includes fuel or not.

  2. Kevin White says:

    I don’t understand the point of passenger pegs/seat on exotic Italian track weaponry.

  3. Ryan says:

    Kevin, I believe the pegs are for the supermodels that request to be your passengers.

  4. I don’t think MV is really thinking its core buyers are going to take the F4 RR to the track.

  5. TeeJay says:

    “some sites have confused as being 201hp”
    Maybe that is because they give the figure in “CV”, which is same as German “PS”, but is not exactly “HP”.

  6. That would indeed be the reason TeeJay. It doesn’t help too that MV is translating CV in HP on its site too.

  7. Sloan says:

    The RR will go to the track. They’ll leave the CC at home to look at.

  8. Ricardo says:

    I would call this a hollow replica until I see one in WSBK.

  9. MikeD says:

    TOTAL FAP MATERIAL, Specially The White One… (^_^ )

  10. fazer6 says:

    I think many of these will indeed be tracked. See here: http://mvagusta.net/forum/showthread.php?t=24141

  11. sunstroke says:

    “reducing the linear velocity of the piston (from 24.7 m/s to 22.9 m/s) and thus also improving reliability.”

    I have a hard time believing that increasing cylinder bore and decrease stroke is going to improve reliability. If MV are going to make outlandish claims, they should show the physics. Last time I checked, decreasing the stroke means that the engine goes from 22.9m/s in one direction to 22.9m/s in the opposite direction in less time with much higher acceleration (shorter crank throw). That’s before the consequences of bigger pistons are considered.

    Furthermore, I’ve never heard of a bike that needs constant maintenance to reciprocating internals below the cylinder head. On the contrary, every sport bike we purchase needs constant maintenance to the top end. How does decreasing the mean piston velocity make any improvements to the top end? How does enlarging the valves and raising the rev ceiling improve the reliability of the valvetrain?

    Sometimes I wonder about the Italians.

  12. fazer6 says:

    Luckily, MV’s engines have proved to be some of the most reliable, with impeccable design.

  13. RacerX says:

    remove those passenger pegs and mirrors right away!!