Bottpower’s BOTT XC1 Cafe Racer Rendered

03/06/2014 @ 4:07 pm, by Jensen Beeler28 COMMENTS

Bottpowers BOTT XC1 Cafe Racer Rendered Bottpower XC1 Cafe Racer 09 635x381

Earlier this year, we announced to you that Bottpower was working on a café racer version of its XR1 street-tracker motorcycle. Using a Buell XB as a donor bike, the Bottpower XC1 Cafe Racer kit transforms the big-displacement American twin into something a little bit more hipster.

Though we are not big on the café racer scene (you wouldn’t know it, looking at our posts lately though) we have been enchanted with the work done by Bottpower on this project so far. We imagine the finished result will be coming forth shortly; until then though, we’ll just have to drool over these nearly finalized renders.

And yes for Buell purists, the Bottpower kit has the option to allow you to use the Buell swingarm, belt-drive, wheels, and brakes — if you are into the whole perimeter brake kool-aid drinking thing.

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Bottpowers BOTT XC1 Cafe Racer Rendered Bottpower XC1 Cafe Racer 08 635x380

Source: Bottpower

Comment:

  1. Lance Boyle says:

    U. G. L. Y. It ain’t got no alibi…

  2. emptybee says:

    Chunky monkey!

  3. AK says:

    Clean and very nice built; Loving it.

  4. ADG says:

    Put a propeller and wings on it so you can drop that bomb exhaust like a WW2 pilot.

  5. Starmag says:

    Who knew that de-bugging would become a motorcycle term as well as a computer term? This is good, it would be better in another color though.

    What’s with the tin-foil hat/ kool-aid drinking slurs lately? Beware projection.

  6. paulus says:

    Like it… nice from some angles, but it gives me the impression of a child toy.
    It looks a bit like the LEGO designers take on a motorcycle.

  7. crshnbrn says:

    Some assembly required. Not for children under legal riding age. Kit contains small parts which may be a choking hazard.

  8. ADG says:

    It should be “rendered” down down by hitting delete on the CGI program.

    Steaming turd.

  9. L2C says:

    I like these renders. The other thing is that café racers are sport bikes. If you like the machine, damn the hipster label, and ride the machine. This whole labeling thing is right stupid. The bikes exist on their own sans the hipster label.

    And nothing about the BOTT XC-1 says or screams hipster to me. Ban hipster from the English language, or at least motorcycling journals.

  10. ANT says:

    creating renders of cafe racer??? whaaa

    its just something you do in a workshop, you don’t use cad to plan a cafe racer,

    crazy people!

    …cool render though

  11. Gonzo says:

    The Shark has been jumped.

    A cafe racer has been described as “Something a little more Hipster”

  12. tonifumi says:

    Awesome, beautiful. Perfect !!

  13. Richard Gozinya says:

    If they really want to tap into Harley racing heritage, they would’ve made it a replica of Lucifer’s Hammer. It’d even have some relevance to the company’s name.

  14. Hugo says:

    Hello everybody, thank you for all the comments. For the design, we started with a white paper (I didn’t knew that last bike of emptybee) The problem was that the Buell has a very short wheelbase (1321mm), shorter then a 600 racebike and an engine which is positioned relatively high in the chassis. This meant that getting the proportions right was a tricky task, it should look long and low for a “Cafe Racer” and getting it right was no easy task. Bottpower works with CAD so that way we can try several solutions before finalizing the design, also that way we can show the customer (this bike is made for a customer) what he can expect, he can “walk” around the bike before anything is built which is an advantage for us. This is the first version, the second version has a different, a little more modern, fueltank making it look a little sportier. People who have seen the video of the XR1 on the racetrack know what kind of performance this bike can deliver so it is not “only” show but a serious bike to ride hard…

  15. TonyC says:

    Bottpower might be the worst name ever for a motorcycle.

    A: Cool bike! Who did the fabrication work?

    B: Bottpower

    A: Buttpower?!?!?!

    B: Yup, all the work was done by Buttpower.

    A: How does it ride? The seat padding does seem a little bit thin

    B: The suspension is stiff and hard on the rider. My behind is pretty sore and beat up after a long Buttpower ride.

    A: …..

  16. Jorge says:

    Rightly or wrongly I compare all these “commissioned” half done cafe jobs against bikes like the NCR New Blue. I think the XR1 is a great platform but besides some decent digital fab pieces there isn’t much else going on. Is there a full custom titanium exhaust planned? The current setup looks like the dogs dinner.
    The headlights ICON (e.g. Bronco and FJs) use would not be out of place here either.

  17. Sean says:

    The original cafe racers were 350 and 500cc British singles, and the “look” was just the practical result of the need to tuck in tight, to get sporting speed from less than thirty horsepower. Maybe any naked bike with clubman bars and a solo seat qualifies as a “cafe racer”, but I feel like small displacement is one of the essentials.

    So, remove the rear cylinder – it’s just a cooling headache anyway – and rotate the front cyclinder vertical, and I’ll be happy. :-)

  18. kevin says:

    you know i didnt think you could make a buel look worse. i was wrong

  19. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    As a former Buell owner I think this bike looks great. Had Buell made something more along these lines he woulda met with more success.

    The purists probably liked the fuel in the frame, oil in the swing arm, funky front brake Buell formula… But I agree with Jensen. That’s drinking the cool aide. They were big ideas from Buell, but in the final assessment, were they good ideas?

    The earlier Buells in the “90s were much more interesting than the fuel in the frame days.

  20. crshnbrn says:

    re: “Had Buell made something more along these lines he woulda met with more success.”

    Maybe, maybe not. The XR1200 garnered rave reviews from motorcycle publications not known for being kind to H-D, yet the XR1200 was discontinued after just 5 years of production. If Buell had made something like Bottpower’s XR1 street-tracker, they would have sold at least one.

    I like what Bottpower is doing with the XB except for the fact that it uses a bike no longer in production as a donor.

    I always liked the style of the S3 & S3T except for the square headlight which looked very 1980s. Having ridden several tubers and a few XBs, I will say they both have their merits, but I would rather own an XB. The XBs were far better bikes than the tubers.

  21. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    Agreed. But keep in mind the tube frame idea was abandoned instead of allowed to evolve. Could it have evolved? Would it have evolved into something rather akin to the bike in this article? Does fuel in the frame really make that much sense? It was an interesting idea just not a good idea.

    The XR1200 was a great bike. Wouldn’t you say its demise had more to do with a sinking Harley during a bad economy?

  22. crshnbrn says:

    I wouldn’t say putting the fuel in the frame was a bad idea, but it was perhaps not the best idea for an air-cooled engine. The XBs definitely run warmer than the tubers.

    I never really thought about the XR1200’s demise other than people looking for that type of bike don’t think of looking for it at a H-D dealership. But thinking about it and the closure of Buell makes me more curious about why the XR1200 was created in the first place. Its development had to start years before the carpet was pulled out from under Erik. It begs the question was the XR1200 intended to be an offering for the sport-minded rider so they could shutter Buell?
    The XR1200 was initially released only in Europe, so I’m sure the collapse of the global economy had an impact on sales, especially in that part of the world. But with so much of the parts used unique to only those two models, H-D may have had to buy their way out of minimum quantity agreements with suppliers. The development was done, tooling was in place, suppliers were lined up, the bike was good, what difference did it make how many they could sell? Perhaps H-D just circled their wagons a little too tightly.
    Sadly, H-D has no “sporty” Sportster models in their line up – if you can use the word “sporty” in reference to a H-D motorcycle. If H-D could take a Sportster powertrain and build a street-tracker or café racer around it like Bottpower’s XR1 and XC1, or build a scrambler, they would sell at least one. Provided I haven’t already found a used XR1200X.

  23. wqw says:

    The earlier Buells in the “90s were much more interesting than the fuel in the frame days.

    No, they were not. They were boring compared to the new ones.

  24. Paul McM says:

    This whole cafe racer thing is starting to depress and annoy me. I mean for goodness sake, today you could outrun most real vintage early 60s cafe racers with a Burgman scooter (which can do 115 mph), so what is the point of making any bike an uncomfortable single-seater that’s not good in town, uncomfortable on the highway, and that will never, ever, ever be on a race track anyway. In this case I surely do not see the point in taking a big heavy bike that shakes a lot (but at least can hold two people and has decent ergos), and making it into a big, heavy bike that only holds one person and that is uncomfortable to ride with bars that impede slow- and medium-speed maneuvers.

    And frankly I just don’t get the cafe mindset at all. Presumably, many of these cafe racer poseurs are doing this to attract attention from the opposite sex (or same sex if that’s their romantic bias). But then, why have a bike that can only hold one person? One of the most fun things I did in my 20s and 30s was ride with my girlfriend on the back. Don’t young people do that anymore? Has Gen X and Gen Y become so solipsistic that they don’t ever ride with a girl on the back? This whole cafe racer thing is just becoming so lame and nonsensical that I’m beginning to wonder if it’s all just weak-minded “join the pack” behavior by shallow, unfulfilled people who want to identify with something.

  25. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    @wqw, I don’t think you’ll find many peeps agreeing with you that the Buells of the “90s were boring. Find me one person who sees one rambling down the road and thinks ‘boring.’

    Cafe bikes are interesting in the same way that naked sports are interesting. If you’re going to criticize the cafe bike genre then don’t stop there. Naked sports? do you think people buy them because they’re trying to fool you into believing their naked bike was once a sportbike that they crashed, removed the fairings, and put motocross bars on? What about repli-racers? are those above criticism? people buying those trying to pull the wool too? that they might actually race for a living?…adventure bikes? seriously think anyone on those will attempt to cross the arab desert?

    I don’t think cafe bikes are about poseurs or attention getting. Like all the rest, it’s paying homage. I think it’s as simple as buying something you find interesting that’s fun to ride.

    why is joining the pack weak or identifying with something weak? Join the pack or don’t what’s the difference to you? Do what you like. You gotta live.

  26. M. Mansfield says:

    Ok, I am officially and completely done with Harley-anything. Let’s be honest, the only thing they sell is a strange sub-culture of virtual-sameness. There are SO MANY superior engines available that put HD’s to complete shame – with soul, guts, power, reliability and smoothness. One has to wonder about a brand that requires so much aftermarket to fix it.

    If you never publish another article featuring Harley Davidson, it wouldn’t hurt my feelings…

  27. I’m not a fan of Café racers, not enjoying bugs in my teeth, eyes and nose, or sore collarbones at the end of every ride, or bikes that largely underperformed, compared to any modern sport bike, and are not really enjoyable to ride, that are pretty much for posers not real riders. But I have to say that I like this, it’s pretty. :)