New Triumph Street Triple Debuts with 765cc Engine

01/10/2017 @ 12:17 pm, by Jensen Beeler95 COMMENTS

As expected, today we get to see the 2017 Triumph Street Triple, with its new engine capacity: 765cc. The new engine displacement comes from both an increase in bore and stroke on the iconic three-cylinder motor, with Triumph using a new crank, pistons, and barrels in its construction.

Three flavors of Triumph Street Triple will be available for 2017, with S, R, and RS-spec (above) machines being available, with obvious performance differences existing between the trim levels.

As such, peak horsepower will be 113hp (S), 118hp (R), and 123hp (RS) – a notable boost over the 675cc machine’s 105hp. Meanwhile, peak torque has been improved from 50 lbs•ft, now to 53 lbs•ft (S) and 56 lbs•ft (R & RS).

All the models tip the scales at 166kg (dry) according to Triumph, which is a 2kg reduction over the outgoing model.

2017 Triumph Street Triple S:

2017 Triumph Street Triple R:

The bump in displacement is surely a result of two factors: 1) the tightening emissions controls in Europe, which have seen manufacturers bumping bikes up in displacement to hit horsepower goals, and 2) a response to the burgeoning middleweight streetfighter market, which is moving to engine sizes that are closer to 800cc in displacement.

Adding some refinement to the smaller streetfighter, Triumph has included a TFT dash on the R & RS models, as well as a slipper clutch. The RS model sees the addition of a quickshifter.

The Triumph Street Triple RS also comes with higher spec components, including fully adjustable Showa big-piston forks (BPF), Öhlins TTX 40 shock, and Brembo M50 four-piston caliper brakes up front. The Street Triple RS includes five riding modes on its ride-by-wire system.

Meanwhile, the Triumph Street Triple R only gets four riding modes, and sees its go-fast components speced-down to separate-function Showa big-piston forks (SF-BPF), a Showa rear shock, and Brembo M4.32 four-piston calipers.

The Triumph Street Triple S makes do with two riding modes, separate-function Showa forks (SFF), a preload-adjustable Showa rear shock, and two-piston front brakes.

The 2017 Triumph Street Triple will start at $9,900 MSRP in the USA ($11,200 in Canada) with the S-spec model, and go on up from there.

Source: Triumph

  • Sofratuzu

    So, no RT then?

  • imprezive

    It’s exactly what I expected but I’m still disappointed. It’s typical Triumph to do a solid build that get’s it up to the class standard but never above. It would have been nice to see LED headlights, cornering ABS, wheelie control, and an up/down QS on the RS at least.

    I’m not a fan of the R getting a red sub-frame and the RS getting a silver. I think the R looks much more performance oriented even though it’s not.

  • fzrider

    Nice. Not sure it fulfills the promise of the teaser video though.

  • durandal1

    OK, now a Daytona with this platform please.

  • MrDefo

    I have yet to ride one, but the smaller engined Stripple was really popular for its easy handling. I’ll be curious if the bigger engine and resultant configuration will change that any.

  • Superlight

    OK, now tell me again why Triumph should be the moto2 engine supplier instead of MV? I’m not impressed with their bore/stroke job. Big deal.

  • Superlight

    Don’t hold your breath.

  • LeDelmo

    Jesus Triumph…

    You know I have come to expect crap like this from them. I just wish they would try to hype these POS’s up so much.

    “New Benchmark” my aunt fanny. This is a bad joke. Triumph freaking needs to atleast put some real effort into a full line refresh or get out of business.

    This may sound a little harsh but I am a Triumph owner. And stupid stuff like this is having a effect on me. My Triumph is getting VERY long in the tooth. It’s 10 years old already. Yet, I cant find a suitable replacement.

    There are so many good new bikes but none of them has the draw that my 07 S3 does. And thats sad.

    But this one was the one that really hurt. This could have been great but Triumph did what Triumph always does.

    I was going to make a sour joke about a fire…. But…

  • Antonio Jicquel

    New moto2 engine ?

  • imprezive

    Because they aren’t teetering on the edge of bankruptcy.

  • imprezive

    I have a Speed R, my next bike will probably be a Super Duke R. It seems to check all the boxes that Triumph refuses to.

  • PierreLaPierre

    I’m with you and being a Brit am disappointed that Triumph missed yet another opportunity in both styling and technical execution like they’ve been doing with the Speed Triple these last few years. They even started this category with the 94 Speed Triple. Maybe Triumph have been paying a little too much attention to their ‘vintage’ range. I tested the Thruxton 1200R in the Summer and it was nice but too expensive and at least 25kg too heavy and ditto for most of the current range. Sums it up that I’ve owned 5 Triumphs but 3 years ago when wanting to buy a real streetfighter and ended up buying a V4 Tuono. And why sit at 765cc with this? A complete restyle and why not at least 800cc or even 850cc or 900cc and move the Speed to 1215 or 1300 which should have been done 3 or 4 years ago with a good reduction in weight. Just look at the MV Agusta 800’s styling Triumph. Wake up and smell the coffee before it’s too late.

  • Fidel Cash-Flow

    Still has the bug eyes bulging out of the front? No thanks

  • Joonil Park

    Ugh +1 on those doofus headlights.
    Too much to ask to not have those monstrosities protruding over the front axle? A little underwhelming of an update after all the hype, but it’s always been a great bike…at least go back to the double round units from the 1st gen/955i throwback…

  • Dustin Nisbet-Jones

    Pretty big displacement bump for a middleweight but it certainly makes sense given the direction this class is going. I like it.

  • Brett Lewis

    I know, disappointed…

  • Darren B

    stylewise, subtle changes but definitely the best it’s looked. new dash looks great though, thats a big improvement.

    i’d definitely put money down on the 2018 model daytona765 being announced sometime this year..

  • Nick

    After that teaser video I was expecting it to have a zillion horsepower, teleportation mode and make my breakfast for me.

  • JSTNCOL

    Hello, I’m here to join the chorus of those offended by the headlights. Every time Triumph introduces a new Street Triple it makes me like the previous one more. And is it just me or do those forks look spindly and weak?

  • Darren B

    looks useless for pillioning now as well, was that always the case?

  • Bruce Steever

    #truth

  • LeDelmo

    Yeah the Super Duke seems to be the best option available right now. It has hands down one of these best motors and chassis. I don’t much care for the styling though.

    Plus, I hear the tranny is knida funky. Not bad in any ways just the usual KTM feel. Which I hate. Though I doubt its any worse than my current S3. I guess I was spoiled with my KX’s transmission. “I really loved how it felt.”

    The Aprilia Tuono is another option. But that one I really cant stand the looks of. Maybe I am just too picky.

    Another option might be the Duke 790 but we still dont know anything about that bike really. Not even what its ACTUALLY going to look like. Or what kind of parallel twin is in it.

  • Ulysses Araujo

    Yes, it seems even worse than the previous model, and worse than competitors now. I don’t understand the rationale, it’s not a track-only bike. Despite any possible favorable reviews I’ll have to look elsewhere.

  • Nick Moore

    Sure, marketing’s job is to make some noise and they were never going to redefine a category but jeez some of you folks are real downers.

    Let’s see.
    Bump in HP, bump in torque, drop in weight (fueled this thing should be around 400lbs) engine throttle maps, TC, ABS, TFT Display and better suspension than the outgoing model respectively no to mention Brembo’s on the RS.

    Honestly, what is it that you folks think you need for a STREET BIKE? Vaginal tickler?

    Price will be the only thing to hurt the RS but the other 2 should be ok as long as they aren’t silly close by a $1k each.

  • Nick Moore

    I would have thought the same thing until the Moto2 announcement. It’s going to be a bit but I suspect a new super bike from them in 2019.

  • sigsegv

    Well, at least not today.

  • imprezive

    I love the way the Super Duke looks. I think it looks futuristic and modern which is refreshing. I can certainly see how it’s polarizing. I haven’t ridden one yet but now I’ll be keyed into how it shifts so thanks. haha I think the Tuono looks fine just dated (even though it’s recently restyled).

  • imprezive

    I agree, they seemed to have gone all in on the heritage line. At this point they could have axed the Speed and put that money into a more comprehensive Street redesign.

  • Scott

    I haven’t seen the geometry specifications yet, but this new one is LIGHTER, so I’m hopeful :)

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    I know right…. what else would have possibly made this better? It’s was best in class except HP prior to the update, the entire bike is now better and makes more power.

  • merlot2k1

    I can’t believe Triumph hasn’t cured cancer with the new Street Triple. WTF Triumph?!

  • Superlight

    2 kg lighter.

  • Superlight

    I don’t like MV’s financial position, but I do appreciate the machinery. I was all set to buy a Daytona 675R, until I saw the MV F3. I put a deposit down, bought the MV and didn’t look back. Not a perfect machine, but much more exciting to ride than the Triumph and much better looking. They deserve to survive.

  • mikstr

    Big missed opportunity: why stop at “only” 765 cc? Right from the get-go they head into battle (with Yamaha 850 and MV 800) with a displacement disadvantage. If you’re going to go to the trouble of redesigning, do it right and at least start from parity…

  • imprezive

    By every account I’ve seen MV is horribly run as a business. If anything I’d say they “deserve” to go bankrupt. They build a handful of good looking bikes but running a business is far more than just making a couple middle of the road competitive products. Everything from their financial management, to product planning, to service & support seems poorly thought out and executed. I wish they were a more successful company but I just don’t see it right now.

  • LeDelmo

    Its not that the Super Duke looks bad to me. Its actually a very good looking bike. Its just not my style is all. Allot of bikes are going very sharp and angular. I like simple and smooth lines on my bikes. The fewer and simpler the plastic bits the better. I want the bike to show itself off. Not the plastics to make it look like something, if that makes any sense.

    I might give it another year to see if anything good get announced. If not than I will probably just get a Super Duke myself. “But dam they are expensive lol.”

    KTM’s just shift really hard with really hard clunks and have a mystery neutral. “lol not really its just really hard to find sometimes.”

  • Campisi

    I’m not sure how I’d make it in to work each morning with only 123 horsepower.

  • TheSeaward

    I hope it’s downhill both ways.

  • Campisi

    Local roads only, I wouldn’t dare merging onto a motorway.

  • Lowflying

    Wow. Tough crowd. I test rode a Striple a couple of years ago on a whim. It wasn’t what I was in the market for at the time but I thought it was awesome to ride. This one is improved. I think the bike is pretty cool, but whatever…

    Ya, that pillion seat ain’t gonna cut it. The bike should have an option for a more usable seat considering it’s supposed to be an all-rounder.

  • raaj

    upcoming KTM duke 790 or street triple ? which one to choose..

  • James Raymond

    My first “big bike” was (and still is) a 2013 Street Triple (the current out-going model). Its been an amazing bike! It’s powerful enough to be a hoot, has good brakes that don’t throw an inexperienced over the front, it is light, has a fuel gauge and a gear position indicator. All things that made it the best bike for me by miles.

    The new Street looks amazing, however i am disappointed they have no gear position indicator on the new basic S version which would be the bike new riders like I was 4 years ago would be looking to buy. It is so helpful for the inexperienced so it’s sad they removed it. I also don’t like paying for power. Don’t mind if R/RS versions get you sexier brakes/suspension but all previous Triumph non-r / R versions (Speed Triple/Daytona/old street triples) never made you pay for power.

    Will just have to save up for the RS then :)

  • I am facing the same dilemma myself.

    2018 DUKE 790 vs 2017 Street Triple 765

    Let’s hope the 790 is as bonkers as the YouTube introduction video :)

    PS: I am gunning for 2018 790 ADVENTURE from Team Orange as well!

  • Tadao Baba

    123 bhp with a dry weight of 166 kg.
    THANK YOU TRIUMPH!!!

  • Sunny Soral

    its just that you take longer than most to get used to them… I kinda like these.. but then… I also love the way Benelli TNT899 looks..

  • Pete

    The 105 hp of my ’12 Street R sees me constantly run down by old Hondas and squashed underneath trucks. I can’t even get out of my own way. Thankfully I never have to worry about speeding tickets.

  • Pete

    Let’s see…super naked level suspension and brakes on the RS with less weight?

    Yes please!

  • Superlight

    I’m not trying to justify their business practices, but (unlike you) I know something about the finished product. They’ve got the products about right (the triple family anyhow), but they need help with distribution (mostly) and promotion (a little). They “deserve” to focus on the fundamentals and they will persevere.

  • Spurdog1

    Yeah. Sounds pretty damned good to me too! Dont know what all the bleating is about. The Street has been a top seller for years and all they had to do was make it a bit better and get it through Euro 4…. Job done.

  • Zack Crowther

    You are doing something wrong or live in a fly over state because along the coast in California, I rarely ever have a sport bike catch me much less pass me, and I am riding on 09.

  • Ayabe

    So this is better in every way than the outgoing model, which is still best in class but not enough so queue the tears.

  • Zack Crowther

    For those carrying pitchforks because the bike does not have lean angle sensors for its TC/ABS, cruise control or up/down quick shifter, I say, “Nonesense.” The only naked bikes that have that are Super Nakeds pushing 20K and not even all of those have it. So why, would you think middle weight naked would have it? This bike competes with the FZ-09, KTM 690/790, April Shriva not the super nakeds. If we are to compare it the FZ-09 is the main rival and right now, the match features with Triumph having more versions with extra goodness.

  • Ayabe

    Exactly.

  • Pete

    Look up, you will see the sarcasm from my comment flying over your head. :)

  • Jason

    The product is only one of many business fundamentals.

  • Jason

    Triumph had record sales this year so they must be doing something right. Maybe you just aren’t their target market.

  • pidgin

    Jesus how ugly :D Looks like a lizard from the front

    http://all4desktop.com/data_images/original/4247318-lizard.jpg

  • JSTNCOL

    Maybe it will look better up close.

  • Superlight

    With degrees in both engineering and marketing, I understand the 4 Ps of marketing and how (it appears) MV has not done the fundamentals properly, beyond Product.

  • imprezive

    With degrees in engineering and marketing you should know better. They don’t make business decisions to please the consumer they make them to please their owner. That’s a sure way to have a dumpster fire of a company, which they do. I like some of their bikes and I wish they would succeed but I see little evidence that they will. Which is why Dorna would have been foolish to tie themselves to MV, which was my original point.

  • Jason

    So they only have 1 of the 4 Ps of marketing right and have also failed at finance, sourcing and manufacturing… Why do they “deserve” to survive again?

  • Superlight

    You may not know that Ducati was in a similar position back in the early ’80s. I bought a 1982 Pantah 600 when there was only one (tiny) dealer in the state and parts were hard to find. They had just about folded as a business concern. Fortunately Ducati was acquired by Texas Pacific Group (venture capital) and they helped “right the ship”. MV needs Giovanni to let go the reins enough to get help from those who know business.

  • Superlight

    See my comments above.

  • Superlight

    I hate the Super Duke’s looks. Even I can do the origami “folded paper” look and I’m not a designer.

  • Superlight

    It could look a lot better. Compare to the MV Brutale 800. The Triumph, next to the MV, looks like a Chinese effort.

  • imprezive

    I completely agree. AMG should have been their savior but Giovanni couldn’t let go. I don’t see what’s going to change his mind at this point.

  • Csorin

    I actually prefer the Triumph. The MV is bulbous and overdesigned. Reminds me of a Suzuki Gladius. To each their own.

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    I find the mv to be ugly. Not to mention the price is rather high. Sure it’s not a huge step from the triumph, but you have to consider the fz09 in this conversation as well and the triumph is already expensive compared to that. For what MV is asking for that thing I’ll just get a BMW or Ducati.

  • Jason

    I’m well aware of Ducati’s past. As you said, their savior was being bought out by a venture capitalist and run as a proper company.

    The family that owns MV is not willing to let it go. They still hope to find someone willing to give them more money to continue business as usual.

  • Superlight

    I think what will change his mind is the reality that, if he doesn’t, the brand will not exist.

  • imprezive

    That doesn’t seem to have gotten through to him so far but we shall see.

  • Superlight

    As has already been stated, styling is a personal matter. I respect the value inherent in the FZ09, but think it looks like most Japanese efforts these days – a Transformer toy.

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    Well what exactly does the MV do besides exclusivity that the triumph doesn’t? The way I see it the MV iss 50% more expensive than FZ fox and 25% more expensive than the Triumph. That’s huge. I can get a speed triple for less than a MV.

  • Ayabe

    Good luck getting a fat hog on the back your FZ9 or whatever you deem the competition.

    Bikes like this shouldn’t even have rear pegs.

  • Superlight

    Well, this would depend on your personal priorities in a motorcycle. If low cost is top of your list, buy the Yamaha, which is a great value. If you’d like something a little different, something you don’t see every day, the Triumph is a fine choice. I prefer a Ducati (Monster) or the MV, which place a high priority on design integration, something I believe is sorely lacking in the other bikes mentioned. That’s my opinion and I put my money where my mouth is – I’ve owned Ducatis and now have an MV.

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    See I’d buy a monster no problem. I would have a tough time buying the MV even if it was the same price as the Yamaha.

  • Superlight

    Understandable with all the financial problems MV has currently, but if it were strictly down to aesthetics, MV wins for me, no contest. I guess that’s why they make more than one motorcycle brand, isn’t it?

  • Ulysses Araujo

    Why? Why should I own multiple bikes to give a ride to my girlfriend because someone deemed a $10 cheaper piece of footpeg could do the job (of being useless)?

    Kawasaki’s both nakeds (Z900 &1000) have better ergos for pillions. As Yamaha’s FZ 07 (with the 09 being an exception, but at least they offer both in faired and pillion rideable guise). This also loses to the S1000R and the F800R. Heck, even the Superduke seems better! So it seems all the competition is better, even Triumph’s own pseudo classic line. Anyway, it’s useless to argue now, I’m voting with my money (on other bike).

  • MrDefo

    Ok, so it’s a little more out there. I’m not sure how much .7° and 7.4mm will change things, perhaps too little for mere mortals to notice.

  • Andre Capitao Melo

    People just love to complain.

  • Andre Capitao Melo

    That are the specs for the S, the R and RS have the rear jacked up, making these numbers lower.

  • Scott

    Good eye! That’s even better news :D

  • hugh

    I’m so glad you did that – I totally agree they deserve to survive! If I was in a position to buy a new bike I would buy an F3 tomorrow. Now I just need more people like you to keep them in business until the day comes when I *am* in a position to buy one of my own :-)

  • hugh

    OK now I just read your other posts. Clearly you have exceptional taste in motorcycles.

    Now, if you *really* want to follow your heart and take a risk you should get a Moto Morini next :)

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    You’re definitely right, otherwise we would all be on Hondas. :( Really though, for me, it’s all comes down to enjoying riding. I can have fun on anything, therefor, I’d love to ride with you and your MV.

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    Can’t wait to hear how Jensen and Quentin think these new Triumph compare to their precious Ducatis!

  • The Hooded Man

    Gutted. The ‘RT’ was supposed to be the ‘no brainer’ truly original addition in the new ‘800’ line up. Lightweight Sport Tourer – decent fairing protection, comfy touring seats, lots of extra new torque, up right position … the spec was mouth-watering. The new market niche is exactly this type of bike – which is why Sports Touring Bikes are making such a massive comeback for bikers that don’t want huge, tall, heavy ‘adventure’ bikes to chuck around. So bikes like the Kawasaki 1000SX and the BMW 1200RS are selling like hot cakes. But I am looking for something lighter – not 235-240 kg. I thought Triumph were going to offer the solution I was looking for (I live in a street with a steep hill, so light weight is important to me). I was so looking forward to the Triumph 675 RT – it was on my list of bikes to try out for a definite purchase this Spring. Oh well, looks like its the Ducati Super Sport instead then.

  • grahluk

    Someone enlighten me please. Did the average rider just get that much better? Have our roads and highways clear of dawdling inattentive millennials and their helicopter soccer moms following them into adulthood? Speaking of roads have they been widened and all tar snakes, frost heaves, and roadside obstacles been removed? No? Then why in the fawk has middle weight sport and naked sport bikes fallen victim to displacement inflation? 800cc 123hp is now a middle weight bike? They used to call that a superbike when the likes of yer maun and Foggy humbled talents greater than the weekend warriors who’ll sling legs over the likes of this Triumph. No wonder motorcycling is dying to the younger generations. All you have are crappy cheap budget 250-500cc sheep in wolves clothing and the Brembo & Ohlins laden performance bloat above 750cc for mid life crisis heroes. And thus dies the performance 600.

  • Sofratuzu

    Couldn’t agree more. Z1000SX and 1200RS are the only other old-school (not “adventure”like) sport tourings out there but a more nimble 765cc triple would have been a blast.

    Touring aspect of Super Sport seemed a bit weak, not even a hard pannier option..?

  • Andre Capitao Melo

    MT-07, Z650, the new air-cooled Monster, SV650, Street twin and variants, CB650… Need more examples?

  • grahluk

    I stand corrected. They also offer crappy cheap budget bikes in the middle weight category. Middle weight being larger than an MSF school mule and smaller than a 200hp liter bike. All with “take out delivery transport” written all over them. No, what I’m talking about is something that is not a beginner bike. A bike with the chassis, suspension, and motor of a thoroughbred but with the specs that are meaningful for the street or track that those of us without GP trophies can wring out. The latest SP, RRR, RRSP, Superdelussia or whatever sporting this year’s halo bike nomenclature make about as much sense as a real thoroughbred race horse in a petting zoo pony ride paddock. All those bikes you mentioned as well as their smaller cheapo parts bin bikes are on the other end of the analogy. short legged, sway back donkeys that only are only sporty when compared against each other. My lament is that the likes of the 675 Street Triple, the CBR600RR, the Monster 1100EVO are all going extinct. Why? Give me 100hp in a 300lb high spec package or as close to that as practical.

  • Andre Capitao Melo

    You’re delusional, mate.

  • MikeD

    LMAO.

  • MikeD

    Ok, let’s get this bitching on the road: Nice job,Triumph ! Whole different bike! NOT !
    I still remember how high and hard they “spinned” & announced the then new ground breaking Tiger 800 twins…………….yeah, was not impressed then nor a my now.
    Keep those shenanigans up, people eventually catch up to it and you become “irrelevant” and get put in the radar’s “ignore list”.
    That being said, i find myself looking at Streeples and Speeds R with the factory slapped fancy boingers, stoppers and quickshifter on Craigslist more often than not and I just love the Triple’s sound….and i personally don’t give a hoot about the headlights. Part of it’s identity for better or worse.
    The day i get sick of my BOOMING 996 90* twin i’ll look their way and see what catch my eye then.
    Sometimes i catch myself daydreaming of putting a Rocket III on serious diet and making it a stop lite to lite terror. A fool and his dreams. LOL.

  • grahluk

    Expand on that. Those bikes you named aren’t cheap and noodle framed with budget components? Name a high spec middle weight sport or naked sport bike on offer that was designed post recession?