2013 Suzuki GSX-R1000 “One Millionth” Special Edition

10/04/2012 @ 11:49 am, by Jensen Beeler40 COMMENTS

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In its 27 years of GSX-R branded motorcycles, Suzuki has sold over one million of the peppy sport bikes around the world. Helping commemorate that feat, Suzuki debuted at Intermot this week the 2013 Suzuki GSX-R1000 “One Millionth” Special Edition model, which will be sold in limited quantities (1985 units, to be precise).

Made distinct with its red nose cone and special paint scheme, the 2013 “Millionth Edition” Commemorative GSX-R1000 also comes with black Brembo Monoblock callipers with gold lettering, wheel stripes, gold forks, a celebratory tank graphic, a numbered top yoke, red fork tops, and a special key ring.

No word on what pricing will be, or whether the special edition Suzuki GSX-R1000 will make it to North America. But considering that many of those million GSX-R motorcycles produces landed on American soil, you would think the “Millionth Edition” Commemorative Suzuki GSX-R1000 would as well.

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Source: Suzuki

Comment:

  1. Halfie 30 says:

    Very cool idea. I’m sure it will look better in person though.

  2. Michael says:

    hideous

  3. AK says:

    Suzuki is a joke when it come to design something new. First 2013 Hayabusa now this !!!!

  4. kevin says:

    @AK

    Hush your mouth. The Hayabusa is THE super model of motorcycles.

  5. AK says:

    one of those plus size model.

  6. meatspin says:

    the nose looks like a baboon’s ass thats in heat.

  7. Ken C. says:

    Oh, Suzuki. So much ugliness here. So much disappointment. When are they going to give us a REAL update?

  8. Daniel Croft says:

    I really hope Suzuki have something serious in the works, the BNG updates are getting a bit ridiculous.

  9. haplonic says:

    NOT an attractive motorcycle.

  10. RGR says:

    BNG…BFD

  11. “one of those plus size model.”

    “the nose looks like a baboon’s ass thats in heat.”

    Damn. It’s a VERY good thing I didn’t have coffee in my gullet when I read these two comments. ROTFLMAO!

  12. Spektre76 says:

    1,000,000th time they’ve only changed the paint and graphics. They should just call this a 2010 v1.3

  13. Dman says:

    The only thing more appealing to children than a white van with “free candy” painted on the side is this. Going to be awhile before this becomes the meme that replaces pedobear, but it will happen!

  14. AGP says:

    That has to be the least attractive Gixxer ever. :( It looks so old, and tired, and fat, and with that red nose it also looks drunk.

  15. john says:

    it doesnt nearly as nice as the zx10r

  16. I immediately liked it because the GSX-R-1000, and we all know what a comfortable glove they are to ride, that said, the paint scheme and general bodywork design seems very dated and uninspired. With a good paint scheme, it would probably look pretty good, but what’s with the black that makes it look like the main spars continue on into the nose of the fairing? Interesting idea, but very poor execution.

    I have to agree with meatspin’s baboons ass characterization, though I would modify it and say it’s more like a mandrels nostrils, sure to get the attention of the other baboons, but I don’t think human chicks will dig it. :)

    The red accents just don’t really work with the white paint scheme and a small blue lines on the tank. Whoever green lit this at Suzuki needs to be reassigned, and should probably get a long vacation as well.

    I think I could immediately improve the overall look of the entire motorcycle just by whiting out the whole bike including every bit of the black ABS, maybe the tale fender and mirror stalks as well, do away with the red, and reduce the blue and white Suzuki stripe down the side by two thirds, and make it a very light triple blue line that blends into the white of the faring, with the red gsx-R being the only standout Accent on the entire bike.

    All-white motorcycles look good, they have a touch of class (something this Gixer badly needs) even when the bodywork is kind of lame, and they are highly visible on the road making them safer under most light conditions. How about a glow-in-the-dark white. :)

    It’s easy to make a fast bike look appealing, you have to go out of your way to make them look this awkward. I wonder if this design reflects a larger lax lethargic attitude at Suzuki itself.

  17. Joe says:

    A wasted chance at something special. Suzuki please see HP4 when 2,000,000 rolls around.

  18. John says:

    I actually like the old-schoolish, “dated” lines of the GSXR’s… that said, they need to do something about that monolithic headlight. It’s like a giant, hideous blemish on the face of an otherwise (unconventionally) pretty girl.

  19. Sixty7 says:

    Suzuki are so out of touch in what makes a great paint job…………..that looks awful

  20. smiler says:

    Little more to add than what has been said.

    Added almost no value, put on a worse paint job than there was on the bike before.

    I just get the feeling that Honda’s new amazing V$ MotoGP inspired bike will also be as hopeless.

    Ducati are about the only company who know how to fleece, sorry inspire their customers with specials.

    Having sold so many Suzuuuukkii know how to make a fast bike but really. It just looks so dated and they have never built a decent tail end in the bikes history. The Ford Cosworth of the bike world.

  21. meh says:

    There is nothing “special” about it. Looks like horseshit to me. Fat, tired, and ugly. They had the chance to upgrade it, its been 5 years already, and nothing. I don’t have high hopes for an upgrade in 2014 either..

  22. meatspin says:

    Heron Suzuki colors – black yellow and gold would have looked good.

  23. nakdgrl says:

    Rudolph, I thought you lived at the North Pole with Santa! He must have let you out of the stable early this year.

  24. Grand Prix 34 says:

    Suzuki has lost the plot! When the marketing department over rides the engineering department all things go to shit! Forget about unique graphics , badges and keys, if Suzuki wants to commemorate their GSX-R look to the roots and philosophy of the design. Performance is what Suzuki and GSX-R stands for. GSX-RR, RC-30, ZX 7RR and OWO1. These bikes had the right idea and formula. Come on Suzuki give us a bike that is solo seat only no passenger seat. Give us lighter than standard weight. Give us 10 extra hp. Give us upgraded brakes. Give us upgraded suspension. Give us performance! That is what a GSX-R stands for. This is what Suzuki should do to commemorate one million bikes, anything less is a disappointing and does no justice to what GSX-R Stands for.

  25. Sean in OZ says:

    That’s exactly what I would expect from a commemorative GSXR. Standard bike with an ugly colour scheme. Exactly like all the other limited edition GSXR’s in recent memory.

  26. As something of an old-school rider, I’m rather annoyed with this new class of motorcycle rider, who don’t really live in the real world with the rest of us. To them a motorcycle is just a fast flashy toy, the latest status symbol or expression of their acceptance into the club of cool.

    I see examples in the comments on this post, like ‘Grand Prix 34′ who suggest serious performance bikes shouldn’t have passenger seats. How absurd, a motorcycle whatever its design is first and foremost a mode of transportation. I bought my first street bike before I ever had a car, it was my only mode of transportation, and it was practical because I lived in a place without winter weather, Florida. And since then every bike I bought, most of which were top-tier sport bikes, have been used for daily transportation, because I love to ride and prefer it to driving a car. So having a passenger seat, as well as some under seat storage, was a necessity of daily life.

    It saddens me to see motorcycling becoming just another pastime for the well-heeled classes, those who have plenty of leisure time and disposable income that they don’t know what to do with. Riding is not a way of life for such people, they don’t ride in the rain, or the cold, or to work, or school. They only ride when they’re bored and need to inject some cheap thrills into their empty lives.

    Real motorcycle riders are on their bike seven days a week, usually only resorting to four wheels when weather conditions make it impractical or unsafe. Real motorcycle riders know what it’s like when your bike becomes a part of you, an extension of your body almost. They understand how great it is to share that feeling with someone you care about, someone who makes you feel as good as your bike does. The intimacy of having another person pressed up against your body is experienced in only a few situations in life, when you’re in bed, when you’re dancing, or when you’re riding double. Why would anybody who knows what that’s like willingly give it up, that’s like giving up sex, but I suppose for some folks that’s no big deal either, sad.

    Some of the best memories of my life are of the girls and women I’ve known wrapped around me on my bike. Among other things it’s an expression of trust and confidence in your ability. It’s the kind of thing that helps build a bond with another person. And if you’ve ever had a passenger that knows how to move with you during a fast ride, knows how to keep themselves in the right place, make themselves a part of you and the bike going through a fast corner, you know what a rare and special experience that can be. But I suppose I’m talking about things that many modern riders have never experienced, and probably never will experience. Again, how sad.

    I wouldn’t buy a bike that didn’t have a passenger seat, much as I might prefer to ride an Aprilia RSV4 or BMW HP4, I’d buy a GSXR or R1 or CBR instead, because I’ve always lived in the world of Real motorcycle riding, where a certain amount of practicality is a necessity. Obviously some manufacturers, those who cater to a certain class it seems, have made the decision to no longer consider some riders a viable part of their customer base.

    They already make bikes that will never have their performance envelope explored by more than a third, by 90% of the riders who buy them, the same goes for the Japanese sport bikes. This GSX-R is already so good that 99% of the people who buy them aren’t good enough to even come close to exploring the depths of its performance parameters. The new BMW has MotoGP caliper brakes, which are actually far too powerful for any rider who hasn’t been trained how to use them. I recently saw a video of a guy doing a face plant after endoe-ing his HP4 when a pedestrian ran in front of him and he grabbed too much brake. That’s just pitiful. In my opinion nobody should be allowed to buy one of these bikes until they’ve been properly trained how to ride them, as well as how to stay alive on the road on such a hyper bike.

    There’s absolutely no reason these bikes shouldn’t have a passenger seat, as well as a nice little trunk in the tail to put your stuff in. It would have zero impact on their performance potential, and it would make them far more user-friendly and practical, plus the people who buy them would do a lot more riding on them. And that’s what this is really all about, not making sales, building brands, creating images, or upping corporate profit margins, it’s about showing people the joy of motorcycle riding. There is absolutely no reason that a high-performance sport bike can’t be an entirely practical daily rider, the Japanese have been proving that for the last 50 years. So from that standpoint I’m glad Suzuki hasn’t gone down the hyper narrow focus road with their top bike.

  27. AGP says:

    Of all the things to complain about…

    First: these are RACE REPLICAS – if you want practical you can look elsewhere, plenty of great bikes to chose from.

    Second: there are plenty of “modes of transportation” designed for one person at the time – since when carrying a passenger is a requirement? I think the only “absurd” thing is to put a person on the back of a race bike with lights and mirrors on it. It looks ridiculous, it greatly affects the maneuverability of the vehicle and it is unnecessarily dangerous. Use the right tool for the job. If you want to have a woman wrapped around you there are a multitude of offerings that are sporty AND suitable enough.

    Third: all the bikes you listed, including the HP4 and RSV4, come with pegs and seat for a passenger (even if it might not be mounted by default), should you be able to find someone small and crazy enough to want to climb on the back there.

    Lastly, it couldn’t have been an HP4 in the video you saw since that is not out yet.. But I get your point. I agree that rider training is very important, exponentially more so when high performance bikes are involved.

    Times change… Roll with it! :)

  28. J says:

    Well.. as expected.. Suzuki has always produced an ugly bike, year in and year out…
    This, by far is the most hideous bikes in 2013!

    Cheers!

  29. Grand Prix 34 says:

    Aaron B. Brown you have misread and misjudged me and my comments. I have been riding the GSX-R series of bikes for 23 years, I do not and never have lived in a place that offers 12 months of riding as I live in Canada. If we are lucky we get 6 months of riding 2 of those 6 usually pretty cool weather. I do ride in the rain and in the cold and when ever I can during the summer months because we do have a shortened season. I am not saying all sport bikes should be solo seat only. What I am asking Suzuki to do is to give me a special edition sport bike that is not compromised. Something to commemorate the philosophy and purpose of SPORT BIKE. For most riders like yourself that appreciate passenger seats, grab rails and storage compartments they can offer the standard bike with all those amenities.

    I used to judge the coffee shop riders, casual riders and those that stunt their bikes or those who just ride one or two thousand kilometers a year and say they are not real riders. This is a closed minded way of thinking because they are mostly just as enthusiastic about motorcycles and the motorcycle culture as the rest of us. They have just chose to enjoy their bike in a different way than me. In the end it is important for people to ride regardless of how they use their bike or what style of bike they ride as long as it is done in a safe and respectful way.

    In my humble opinion all things must be compromised in some way and the things that Aaron likes in a sport bike do offer more usability for day in and day out riding. But I can’t help think that there are many other choices of sport and sport touring bikes that offer the things that make them better MOTORCYCLES all I want is a special edition SPORT BIKE with less compromise not a whole line of GSX-R’s with out a passenger seats.

  30. To the anonymous commentor known as Grand Prix 34

    I’m not sure how you or anyone else could seriously assert that putting a piece of padding on the tail of a bike, and a couple of 5 g pegs is a compromise. You could add these things to a track bike and I doubt very seriously if it would affect lap times at all. Compromise is buying a sport-tour when you want serious superbike performance on the street. These are not race bikes, race bikes don’t survive on the street. You remind me of a guy I knew once, he thought putting a race clutching in his street bike was a great idea, because he thought his street clutch was too much of a compromise. Well after about 20 minutes of riding in stop and go traffic when that race clutch quit on him, he started rethinking his assessment. And of course someone had to give him a ride to a gas station, on the back of their bike, so he could call a flatbed.

    Here’s a scenario you can think about when you’re talking about the compromise of a passenger’s seat on a sport bike. You’re carving high canyon roads, you know like they have up there in Canada, when your buddy hits a patch of gravel and goes down and his bike flies over a guard rail and down into a ravine, to be found by hikers a year later 5000 feet from where it was last seen. So there you are with your friend, he’s bleeding, you’re 30 miles away from the nearest help, it’s getting dark and cold. If you’ve got a minimal passenger seat and a couple of pegs on your sport bike, you just give him a ride home. But if you’re on a Ducati or a new BMW, well you might want to try giving him a ride on that slippery plastic tail, with no pegs, and very likely risk both your lives in doing so, or you’ll be leaving him there while you go for help, and another vehicle to give him a lift.

    Every sport bike has a tail, that’s not a compromise, it’s part of the aerodynamic effect, and since it has to be there, might as well make it as functional as possible for real-world riding, that’s practical common sense. Anybody who has a high dollar sport bike that they put hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars into customizing and improving, know how important it is to have some security for that bike whenever you have to leave it somewhere. Because anybody can pull up with a pickup truck or van, throw it in the back and make off with your bike, never to be seen again. A usable compartment in the tail means you can carry a nice 2 inch thick Kryptonite lock, so when you go to the gym, the library, to school etc. you can lock your bike to something composed of concrete and steel, and know it will still be there when you come back. Just another example of the necessity of adding basic functionality to sport bikes, that in no way need compromise the performance of said bike. That kind of thing can mean the difference between actually using it as practical transportation, or it being reduced to a weekend toy.

    Here’s the tale of a KTM RC8 ( http://ow.ly/ejsR0 ), a bike with very little compromise, yet it has brackets and pegs as well as some kind of removable pad to provide a passenger seat. Every sport bike should come so equipped. If you want to race there is nothing that says you can’t take the brackets off to shed a few ounces. But to say the these are unacceptable compromises is much like saying helmets are too much of a compromise, radial tires are a compromise, fairings are a compromise. I have no patience for those who advance such arguments, since they’re most often put forward by people who have no business being on a motorcycle in the first place. Perhaps motorcycling should require an intelligence test as well, but if that were the case then cycle sales would likely be cut by 50%

  31. TIGGER says:

    I guess I’ll just keep racking up the miles on my 2006 GSXR1000….. Why bother buying new?

    [IMG]http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll220/lontigger/IMAG0273-1.jpg[/IMG]

  32. Sweet-looking ride, Tigger!

  33. Madhvi says:

    i wants upload this video.can i?

  34. Ronnie says:

    The limeted edition looks like a 2001 model, JUST THE TAIL AND HEADLIGHT LOOKS 2013 give us some real looks please. Die HARD SUZUKI MAN.

  35. Barry says:

    2008 was the last decent gsxr 1000 to date!!!
    This statement is common knowledge at tracks across the USA and probably world wide.

  36. Roller says:

    I actually like the livery on this, a few performance updates for this model only would have been even better. To all the haters commenting, do you guys know how hard it is to actually improve the performance of modern super-bikes? It’s like splitting atoms. Suzuki still is the most well put together package. R1’s, Honda 1000’s and the Kawi 1000 all compromise on performance. Why does the R1 still put it’s muffler under the rear seat? Why aren’t the front turn signals integrated into the mirrors? Suzi is still the leader. How many Ninja’s has Kawi sold?

  37. l says:

    Meatspin…you hit it on the head,thats funny lol!!!

  38. Teammgk001 says:

    I like it.

    I like the fact that Suzuki make the best & most reliable engines (as drag racing proves).

    I also like the fact hey make their leading sportsbike a practical proposition for those of us that are not jockey sized lightweights.

    I like that Suzuki’s sportsbikes acknowledge that most of us most of the time ride them on the road – and that some of us choose them to travel distances on too.

    I like blue & white schemes on the Gsxr (and a splash of red goes well with it too).

    (……oh and the brand fanboys should get lost & go back to arguing about game consoles or whatever else they did as boring sad abnoxious teenagers)

  39. PITSTOPGP says:

    OK AGP, WHAT KIND OF BIKE IS YOUR IDEA OF GOOD STYLING? 2005 CBR? YOU HAVE NO TASTE

  40. Chemicalbuoy says:

    Aaron, you’re missing the point entirely.

    It’s a special edition….. It’s supposed to be special.

    If you want a sports bike you can take your wife on the back of, just buy a standard Gixxer and save yourself whetever price hike there is for the special edition.

    And popping to the shops on your special edition Gixxer is absurd. If I’m going to the shops, I go in the car. It has more than one seat, and the wife usually drives……

    And so what if a man buys a special edition bike to only ride it at the weekend on nice days?? Every rider is different, so don’t judge people by your standards.

    It’s all irrelevant anyway. All 1985 of them will sell, and Suzuki won’t really care whether people want 1 seat or 2….