2011 Roehr eSuperSport

05/06/2011 @ 6:30 am, by Jensen Beeler5 COMMENTS

2011 Roehr eSuperSport 2011 Roehr eSuperSport 4 635x441

We heard a rumor that Roehr was teaming up with Hyosung to build an electric streetbike, and low and behold a press release in our inbox today confirmed the news, as the 2011 Roehr eSuperSport is a spitting image of the Korean company’s Hyosung GT650R..except you know, with batteries, electric motors, and a slightly higher price tag. That’s of course because the new Roehr eSuperSport is essentially an electric conversion of the Korean bike.

Announcing a “closer relationship” with Hyosung (the company then states “Roehr Motorcycles LLC does not express or imply any affiliation with Hyosung Motors USA”), Roehr has taken its electric drive system, and placed it in the GT650R rolling chassis to create a 67hp, 100+ mph electric street bike. Though you might scoff at the conversion bike premise, our favorite part about the bike is the $17,995 price tag, which isn’t terribly expensive for a a machine that should go about 75 miles or so on a charge.

If you’ll recall, Roehr’s electric powertrain consists of an AC induction Motor that makes 67hp and 80 lbs•ft of torque. The batteries are LiFePO4, and 7.7 kWh of them are stuffed inside the GT650R chassis. Using the Hyosung roller, Roehr is able to offer many of the features you’d expect on a standard motorcycle, which makes this a fairly complete package. Considering how often we slog the American company here on Asphalt & Rubber, this is pretty high praise coming from us.

This is because the whole Hyosung partnership/non-partnership intrigues us, as it brings an OEM into the electric fray in a larger capacity (pun intended?). What this also means from what we’ve heard is that Roehr and the 2011 Roehr eSuperSport have actual resources at its disposal. So while the American company didn’t include an availability date with its information, having Hyosung in the mix, and what we’ve heard before this announcement, this will be an actual motorcycle you can buy, unlike some of the vaporware competitors that we’ve seen announced in the past few years.

We like it when companies don’t bullshit around, so kudos to Roehrich and his crew on this one. You can pre-order a 2011 Roehr eSuperSport at Roehr’s website.

Specifications:

Motor

Type: AC Induction
Power: 50Kw (67Hp) peak
Torque: 80 lb/ft

Battery

Type: LiFePO4 high discharge cylindrical cell
Voltage/Ah: 96V (nominal) /  80Ah
Amperage: 650 amps (peak)
Capacity: 7.7 Kwh
Charging: 1000 watt on-board
Recharge
time:
7 hours
Management:
LVC, HVC, shunt balancing

Performance
Top Speed:
100+ MPH (160+ Km/h)
Average Range: 75 Miles (120 Km)

Components

Frame: Twin oval tube steel beam frame

Front Suspension: 41mm inverted, adjustable rebound and

compression dampening

Rear Suspension: Single shock with rising rate linkage,

adjustable for preload.

Front Brakes: 2 x 300mm discs, 4 piston calipers

Rear Brakes: Single disc,  2 piston caliper
Tires front/rear: 120/60ZR17;  160/60ZR17 Bridgestone

MSRP: $17,995

Source: Roehr Motorcycles

Comment:

  1. 333 says:

    fancy swingarm there…

  2. Westward says:

    $17995 for a Hyosung bike with an Roehr electric engine… Not my idea of affordable, when one could happily be tooling around town on Ducati 1198 or an MV Agusta F4…

    But to each their own…

  3. Greg says:

    ~$11,400 for an electric motor conversion? I would expect upgraded suspension and several other goodies for a price increase that nearly triples the original cost of the bike.

  4. Trev says:

    The Hyosung rolling chassis is very heavy, and the ergos are pretty awful for anyone under 5′ 10″.
    The suspension and brakes are ordinary too…
    Seems a strange choice to me, or maybe it was the only package Roehr could get easily?
    Another Hyosung tie-in:
    Fischer, have they ever built anything other than prototypes?
    Time to sign up for a Brammo?

  5. Mark says:

    When the batteries alone could account for $5K of the cost of the bike, it doesn’t leave much left over for top shelf stuff. Besides, we are only talking about a 65hp motorcycle, you don’t need Ohlins, and Brembo’s. How do those get you more power and range.
    I think the GT650R choice was a good one. Why spend more money for a chassis and suspension that is overkill on a 65hp bike. They seemed to have spent money on things that matter most on an electric bike, power and battery capacity.