MotoGP: Race Results from Jerez

05/04/2014 @ 2:13 pm, by Jensen Beeler27 COMMENTS

MotoGP: Race Results from Jerez Sunday Jerez Spanish GP Tony Goldsmith 01 635x422

MotoGP Race Results from the Spanish GP at Jerez, Spain:

Pos.RiderTeamBikeKM/HDiff.
1Marc MARQUEZRepsol Honda TeamHonda157.845’24.134
2Valentino ROSSIMovistar Yamaha MotoGPYamaha157.7+1.431
3Dani PEDROSARepsol Honda TeamHonda157.7+1.529
4Jorge LORENZOMovistar Yamaha MotoGPYamaha157.3+8.541
5Andrea DOVIZIOSODucati TeamDucati156.2+27.494
6Alvaro BAUTISTAGO&FUN Honda GresiniHonda156.2+27.606
7Aleix ESPARGARONGM Forward RacingForward Yamaha156.2+27.917
8Bradley SMITHMonster Yamaha Tech 3Yamaha156.2+27.947
9Pol ESPARGAROMonster Yamaha Tech 3Yamaha156.1+29.419
10Stefan BRADLLCR Honda MotoGPHonda155.9+32.872
11Nicky HAYDENDrive M7 AsparHonda155.7+35.490
12Hiroshi AOYAMADrive M7 AsparHonda155.5+40.083
13Scott REDDINGGO&FUN Honda GresiniHonda155.3+43.830
14Yonny HERNANDEZEnergy T.I. Pramac RacingDucati154.8+52.295
15Hector BARBERAAvintia RacingAvintia154.7+54.873
16Michael LAVERTYPaul Bird MotorsportPBM154.0+1’06.182
17Broc PARKESPaul Bird MotorsportPBM153.1+1’23.420
Not Classified
Colin EDWARDSNGM Forward RacingForward Yamaha154.51 Lap
Andrea IANNONEPramac RacingDucati153.75 Laps
Mike DI MEGLIOAvintia RacingAvintia144.96 Laps
Karel ABRAHAMCardion AB MotoracingHonda149.217 Laps
Cal CRUTCHLOWDucati TeamDucati153.823 Laps
Michele PIRRODucati TeamDucati151.125 Laps

Source: MotoGP; Photo: © 2014 Tony Goldsmith / TGF Photos – All Rights Reserved

Comment:

  1. Xan says:

    Looks like the Repsol Hondas and Movistar Yamahas will be 1-4 in every race none of them crash out of. Really impressed with Rossi. He managed to hold Lorenzo and Pedrosa off for basically the entire race. I like Honda, and while I know there are those who frequent A&R that don’t, the fact that Pedrosa isn’t destroying the Yamahas shows that #1 other bikes are able to compete with Repsol and it shows just how good Marquez is. Beating a guy on the same bike, who has 3 championships under his belt, with apparent ease shows just how good he is.

    Another couple of victories and it’s going to be very tough to catch up in points. Assuming he doesn’t DNF a race, I really don’t see Marquez being challenged by anyone but Pedrosa, Rossi, and Lorenzo. Going to be tough to close the gap 5 points at a time after none to many more victories.

  2. vman2957 says:

    The Honda is an overall “better package” and Happens to be the perfect fit for Marquez. . Thing about bikes unlike cars the Rider is an integral part of the chassis. A 6 ft guy in a car should be able to go as fast as a 5 ft individual car is pretty much the same. On bikes however these discrepancies make for larger differences, weight transfer longer arms, shorter legs all that. Just like champions before him he eventually he will have to deal with the cries that he couldn’t do it on another Machine and maybe Marquez will move to another manufacturer to prove it.I t seems all the Greats do. Marquez is good no doubt, annoyingly so. However it does overshadow just how awesome Rossi is 19 years into his career. It will be interesting to see what the exit of Bridgestone does to the equation. I am pretty sure Marquez has never ridden on anything else.

  3. FafPak says:

    @vman2957
    |I am pretty sure Marquez has never ridden on anything else.

    Dunlop supplies tires for Moto3 and Moto2, thus Marquez has def been on other rubber :).

  4. FafPak says:

    It would seem Dani and his team have a strategy down for this year.

    Phase1: Keep close with the front men, watching their strengths and weaknesses but
    Phase2: stay in conservation mode for as long as possible (energy? tires?)
    Phase3: “The Best!” == Fuel loads down, tires are hopefully in better state than front runners:UNLEASH THE BEAST!!!!

    Dani was coy about the question posed in the post race conference, but I think that’s the gist of it. :)

  5. Tomas says:

    It has been noted here on A&R that Marquez may well be the next Doohan as far as his winning races and championships go. While I do not exactly disagree with Xan and A&R’s hypotheses… there is one factor this season that could be a game changer…

    Rain. I’m hoping for a full wet race (NOT a Singapore flood) Just a good wet race showing the fans who has the total package. There are several really good wet condition riders in the field, Edwards, Dovi, Nickey, Crutchlow, and “maybe” more.

    Could wet condition’s effect the championship?… Odds are, NOT. Marquez will continue his streak… Unless, rain stops his reign. (Ya… I know, Bad pun)
    Dovi rides in the wet as if …”It’s water off a Duc’s back”… Ok, sorry. I’m out. :)

  6. Xan says:

    @FatPak: I think Pedrosa knows Rossi and Lorenzo quite well. I’d say 2/3 of the race he was hanging back so he didn’t get tangled up with Lorenzo making a move. When Rossi put a second between he and Lorenzo, he finally just passed Lorenzo. Unfortunately, he didn’t have the time at that point to make a move on Rossi. Had he passed Lorenzo with 10 laps to go, it may have been another 1-2 Repsol race.

    @Tomas: I think that by the time there is a real chance for rain, it may be all but decided. As I said above, all things held equal, Marquez is absolutely in the top 3 in terms of ability. I doubt rain is going to affect the final standings. In terms of Dovi, having “rain is your strong suit” isn’t exactly a recipe for much more than a couple of races being finished better than expected. Also riding the bike that basically only excels in the straights isn’t a recipe for an upset. Also, the handful of races Marquez has been in, in wet conditions, he was still on the podium.

  7. Vman2957 says:

    @FafPak …very true but a moto 2 /moto 3 does not a motogp bike make :) eh regardless it will be interesting.

  8. As usual, Moto3 offered the best racing of the weekend. While the other classes had their moments, Moto3 dished up a great race.

  9. Red says:

    I love Rossi, always will but damn Marquez is so perfect with Honda.

  10. Lee Anderson says:

    All the top four are Aliens, love this Motogp show. I must say I enjoy and appreciate the comments here immensely more than the childish comments at Crash.net real fans here

  11. Lee Anderson says:

    Marquez is doing what the very best riders have learned to do so well: find the absolute limit and ride it the entire race. This takes great concentration and courage. I think Pedro is due a win soon, he needs to break out early other than that he has similar pace as MM. The Yamahas are about equal in performance to the Hondas but perhaps have a slight advantage that only shows after many racing miles!

  12. Lee Anderson says:

    Hondas have slight advantage I meant

  13. Xan says:

    @Lee: Pedrosa is an amazing rider. The difference I’ve seen this season though is that Pedrosa is unwilling (or unable) to ride as aggressively as Marquez. MM is by no means wreck less, but he passes with authority. Pedrosa seems content to take a top 4 even if he could have taken a risk and won. That strategy works at times, but it will not work with the level at which MM and Rossi are racing.

  14. “The difference I’ve seen this season though is that Pedrosa is unwilling (or unable) to ride as aggressively as Marquez.”

    Pedrosa is more of an on-the-edge rider whereas Marquez has no qualms about going over the edge on a regular basis. I think this has probably developed over Dani’s career as a consequence of having suffered through so many debilitating injuries. Marquez seems to bounce and walk away where Pedrosa often breaks and then has to struggle through recovery while still racing. It’s likely that MM will eventually slow down, but I bet the field is unhappy at the thought of how long that could take to happen.

    It’s a shame, too, as I’d really, really like to see Dani finally get that premier-class championship. As it is, I think he’s the strongest contender when it comes to consistently challenging MM this season.

  15. L2C says:

    “It’s a shame, too, as I’d really, really like to see Dani finally get that premier-class championship. As it is, I think he’s the strongest contender when it comes to consistently challenging MM this season.”

    At least one person around here remains objective! ;-)

    My thoughts on Pedrosa today had to do with him not making a move on the Yamahas sooner. Much sooner. I thought he should have made his move on lap 20 or 18 — definitely before lap 16. I was not a happy camper because I knew that he was at least 3/10ths of second faster than both Rossi and Lorenzo. At lap 15, I declared the race over and was very surprised that he moved on Lorenzo on lap 8-7, but I knew it would be difficult for him to pass Rossi with so much time left in the race. And I was right, because generally it takes at least 3 laps to fend Rossi off for good. I guess Pedrosa felt that he needed to cut it as close as possible to help prevent Rossi from retaking the pass, I don’t know.

    Anyway, I was quite peeved with Pedrosa and his team today. My thinking was if Pedrosa was 3/10ths of a second faster per lap than Lorenzo and Rossi, Pedrosa should have passed them early and pulled a gap in an effort to catch Kitchy-Kitchy-Koo. That way even if his tires went off a cliff, or the front kept pushing, or whatever — Pedrosa would have been in a much better position to control Rossi and Lorenzo with 2nd position and the psychological advantage in his possession.

    Not only that, Pedrosa would have been in a great position to put pressure on Kitchy on a track that Kitchy tends to have problems with. The fourth sector dogged Kitchy all weekend long and last year, too. Would have been great if Pedrosa attacked Kitchy in the third sector making it difficult for Kitchy to fight back in the fourth sector towards the finish line lap after lap. Lorenzo almost got it right against Kitchy last year. Believe me, by lap 20 I had Team Pedrosa’s winning strategy all figured out. Problem is, they don’t listen to me.

    Rossi and Lorenzo knew that Pedrosa was having problems because he took so long to make a pass. That’s why Rossi took it to Pedrosa early in the last laps, well before Pedrosa caught up to him. He knew he had everything that Pedrosa could have had, plus the time advantage.

    Anyway, Romano Fenati put a smile on my face. That was good.

  16. “Anyway, Romano Fenati put a smile on my face. That was good.”

    It’s noteworthy that Fenati’s win in the rain there in his rookie season was also from 10th on the grid. The boy’s really something. And with Rossi as his mentor, you gotta know he’s got just about the brightest future possible. Pure gold.

  17. L2C says:

    “It’s noteworthy that Fenati’s win in the rain there in his rookie season was also from 10th on the grid.”

    Yes, and he placed 2nd in his debut race at Qatar that year. It’s a shame Honda let its riders and customers down in 2013. In 2012, Fenati finished his rookie season in 6th with 136 points. In 2013 he finished with 73.

    It’s amazing what Sky VR|46 has been able to achieve in such a short period of time. Even more amazing that Romano Fenati and Francesco Bagnaia had such impeccable timing so early in their careers that both didn’t stand a chance at going unnoticed by Valentino Rossi and the rest of his brand new the team.

    This is a great story. It’s like the misfortune with 2013 FTR Honda had to happen with the two riders. Of course, Rossi also had to happen, too.

  18. Valentino Rossi looked about as good as I’ve seen him in recent years, solid and sure, like the old Rossi. For the first two laps it almost looked like we’d have a real contest for 1st, but as soon as Marquez found his groove it was over. Once again he started putting as much as 4/10s a lap on the others, and had a gap up to 5.3 seconds at the end before laying back and almost coasting the last couple laps.

    Notice how on a nearly 120° F track traction seemed to be a real problem for most everyone, except maybe Marquez. Didn’t see hardly any sliding around from him, like we’ve seen on the cooler tracks. But virtually everyone else, especially the guys who were fighting hard mid-pack, were slipping and sliding, wobbling, their bikes just generally unsettle, highlighted by the high-speed camera footage. One shot of Dani Pedrosa’s bike was particularly telling I thought. There were several low sides by guys mid-corner, who just seemed to lose traction in both tires simultaneously, a pretty common occurrence throughout this season so far. And it really didn’t seem to matter which tires they were on, hard, medium, soft, though I suspect the soft are the worst. These incidents occurred at the beginning of the race as well as near the end.

    I haven’t seen any high sides this season, though I don’t get to see practice and qualifying sessions. Is the incidence of high-siding significantly down with these tires? If so what does that mean?

    Once again Marquez was getting more lean angle through the corners than anyone else, at least 1°or 2° more than the Yamahas. This means that he is getting every corner finished faster than his closest competition. On the larger apex lower speed corner tracks he was getting as much as 3° or 4° more. This may be the primary reasons he’s faster, more lean and less pressure on tires whose traction apparently has extremely narrow limits regardless of conditions or wear. In the shots from above, Marquez looks like he’s slowing down more than anyone else, particularly at the apex of many of the tighter corners. When he’s next to another rider (the few times that’s happened this season) the contrast stands out in stark relief.

    Could Marquez’s secret be that he’s just light years ahead in his ability to adapt to these awful awful Bridgestone tires? Perhaps if we put everyone on Dunlops he’d be coming in 3rd or 4th. :)

  19. “I haven’t seen any high sides this season, though I don’t get to see practice and qualifying sessions. Is the incidence of high-siding significantly down with these tires? If so what does that mean?”

    There have been highsides. Bradley Smith had a monster of a spit-off during FP3 at Qatar. There have been others, but the mechanics of a typical highside are still the same: Too much throttle versus grip and a TC setting that doesn’t manage to catch it in time. Highsides have been on a constant decline over the last few years as Bridgestone improved the warmup times of the tires and the teams improved their traction control electronics.

    “Could Marquez’s secret be that he’s just light years ahead in his ability to adapt to these awful awful Bridgestone tires? Perhaps if we put everyone on Dunlops he’d be coming in 3rd or 4th.”

    There isn’t a rider on the grid who would consider the Bridgestones to be ‘awful awful’ (sic). The biggest fear the riders have for 2016 is that the new tires will not be as mature as the Bridgestones, which have undergone steady development/evolution for years. Michelin, Pirelli and Dunlop have not played the premier game for a lot of years and a lot has changed. Bikes weren’t getting 64 degrees of lean angle back then unless they were crashing.

    As for putting everyone on Dunlops, MM raced on those in 125 and Moto2 as late as 2012, so if we assume similar characteristics in a MotoGP tire, he’ll still win bloody well everything.

  20. L2C says:

    LOL — I’m glad everybody was so nice and didn’t pay any attention to my monumental lap counting f-ckup…

    What I meant was that I thought Pedrosa should have made his move on the two Yamahas with 20-18 laps (laps 8-10) left to go in the race — and definitely by the time there were 16 laps left (lap 12). When Pedrosa made his move on Lorenzo with 8-7 laps left (laps 20-21), I was very surprised. Also, I knew that it would be difficult for Pedrosa to pass Rossi with not so much time left in the race.

    Maybe everybody’s racer brains just did the conversions automatically without really noticing. Still, those were some pretty bad mistakes. Glad I didn’t sign it!

  21. L2C says:

    “As for putting everyone on Dunlops, MM raced on those in 125 and Moto2 as late as 2012, so if we assume similar characteristics in a MotoGP tire, he’ll still win bloody well everything.”

    I think Dunlop has already withdrew itself from consideration as sole tire supplier for MotoGP. That leaves Pirelli, Michelin, and all the others.

    Here’s a thought, what if no one bids? What if all the tire manufacturers are like, “Whatever, MotoGP. We saw what you did to Bridgestone and we don’t like it.”

    Uh-oh?

  22. ‘Here’s a thought, what if no one bids? What if all the tire manufacturers are like, “Whatever, MotoGP. We saw what you did to Bridgestone and we don’t like it.”’

    That’s an interesting question. I can’t imagine nobody stepping forward, though; the commercial advertising of a successful campaign plus the technology gains won through being a single supplier are significant. It’s an incredibly expensive investment, but I think that Bridgestone was being quite honest about having met its objectives. They learned what they could/wanted to and could no longer justify the expense. IMO an’ all that.

    If Dunlop doesn’t step up, I’d be really surprised. After all, they already do Moto3 and Moto2. (That could, however, be all the reason they need to say enough’s enough. Michelin has a long history in the sport, but they’ve been out of the picture for quite some time now. One thing’s certain: I am extremely curious to see how it plays out.

  23. L2C says:

    “One thing’s certain: I am extremely curious to see how it plays out.”

    Yeah, me too. It’s going to be an interesting summer in a number of ways.

  24. Neil says:

    I wonder if Ducati wishes they still had Hayden? Looking good Cal, count that money after every DNF !!!

    Hate to see Nicky on an open bike when he should be on a factory bike…

    That is all…

  25. L2C says:

    Damn this was a depressing race. And aggravating to the extreme. Still not over it. :-/

  26. L2C says:

    He gave up 13 points. 13 points! -instead of 0-5. Ugh!!

  27. L2C says:

    WTF were they thinking?!? I don’t understand. I. Don’t. Understand.

    *sigh*