Factory 2 Rules Adopted for 2014 Season: Spec-Software Compulsory in MotoGP from 2016 Onwards

03/18/2014 @ 8:16 am, by David Emmett34 COMMENTS

Factory 2 Rules Adopted for 2014 Season: Spec Software Compulsory in MotoGP from 2016 Onwards motogp logo 635x423

After a week of debate and discussion, the Grand Prix Commission has finally reached an agreement on the Factory 2 class. It took many hours of phone calls, and full agreement was not reached until late on Monday afternoon, but the agreement contains some significant changes to the long-term future of the MotoGP championship.

The Factory 2 proposal has been adopted in a slightly modified guise, with any manufacturer entering in the Open class liable to lose fuel and soft tires should they win races. But the bigger news is that the full MotoGP class will switch to use the spec software and ECU from the 2016 season, a year earlier than expected.

The proposals adopted by the GPC now lays out a plan for MotoGP moving forward to 2016. In 2014 and 2015, there will be only two categories – Open and Factory Option – with the set of rules agreed at the end of last year.

The new proposal sees manufacturers without a dry weather win in three years to compete as Factory Option entries, but with all of the advantages of the Open class – more fuel, more tires, no engine freeze and unlimited testing. However, should they start to achieve success, they will start to lose first fuel, and then the soft tires.

If Ducati – for it is mainly Ducati to which these rules apply, as they are currently the only manufacturer who are eligible at the moment – score 1 win, 2 second place finishes or 3 third places during dry races, then all bikes entered by Ducati will have their fuel cut from 24 to 22 liters for each race.

Should Ducati win 3 races in the dry, they will also lose use of the softer rear tires which the Open category entries can use. If Ducati were to lose the extra fuel or tires during 2014, they would also have to race under the same conditions in 2015.

The concession is similar to that made for Suzuki after the engine durability rules were first introduced. Suzuki was struggling to last a season with just the 6 engines allowed at the time (now reduced to 5). As Suzuki had not won a dry race for several years, an exception was made for any manufacturer who had remained winless to use more engines.

This is that principle, applied in reverse. Ducati is allowed to effectively run under Open category rules, to allow them to develop their engines, but once they catch up, they will be subject to an extra limitation, first of fuel, then of tires. The loss of fuel and tires will be applied and judged per manufacturer.

In other words, if Andrea Dovizioso, Cal Crutchlow and Andrea Iannone achieve the 2 second places or 3 thirds between them, then they will all be subject to restrictions.

With Ducati now back as a Factory Option entry (but with the advantages of the Open category) they are once again free to use their own software, but with the extra fuel allowance of the Open category. This advantage will be offset if they are too successful, by the reduction to 22 liters of fuel.

At Ducati’s MotoGP launch in Munich last week, Gigi Dall’Igna had told the media that he believed 22.5 liters could prove to be a disadvantage at some tracks using the championship software. Even the latest, 2014 version would not allow them enough control to manage on that little fuel. Now, running their own software, they can manage less fuel.

It also means that the Open entries will all be on the same, less complex 2013 software which they had been using throughout testing. The rule change also allows Suzuki to return as a Factory Option entry in 2015, and yet still enjoy the same benefits as the Open teams.

The much bigger announcement made in the FIM press release was that the introduction of spec software has been both approved and brought forward a year, to 2016. That spec software would be proposed was well known, as Dorna has made it clear that this was the path they wanted the championship to head down for the past four years.

Carmelo Ezpeleta had tried to push the GPC to accept spec software at the time of the switch to 1000cc, at the start of the 2012 season. The factories rejected that idea, however, and Dorna introduced the CRT category instead, to help fill the grids which had dwindled to just 17 full time entries.

The switch to a single ECU for the 2014 season helped persuade Ducati to make the switch to the new Open class, but the Japanese factories – and especially Honda – resisted any attempt to impose the spec championship software on all entries. HRC boss Shuhei Nakamoto had threatened multiple times that Honda would pull out of MotoGP if the spec software were to be adopted.

Whether HRC has changed its position or not remains to be seen, but as the GPC proposal was adopted unanimously, it means that at least two of the three manufacturers in MotoGP approved adopting the spec software a year earlier than projected, starting in 2016, rather than a year later, when the current contracts between Dorna and the MSMA factories all expire.

What could have persuaded the MSMA to accept the spec software proposal was the way the software is to be handled. All of the factories competing in MotoGP will have an input on the development on software, and be able to monitor progress. This could allow factories to still pursue some R&D goals indirectly with electronics, rather than being excluded altogether.

This does raise the prospect of software becoming too complex, but Dorna will be gambling on two things. Firstly, that as all code is visible to all of the manufacturers, no factory will introduce its most complex and advanced ideas, for fear of other factories copying the concept in their own road bikes.

And secondly, because Dorna still controls exactly what actually goes into the software, they will still be able to reject ideas which they believe could drive costs up too much for private teams.

The question is, whether this agreement is the end point for discussions on the championship software for MotoGP, or whether this is a point along the road. In extensive discussions with key stakeholders in the rulemaking process, we have been told many times that the final goal for Dorna and IRTA is to have a rev limit in place, and software which is simple enough for privateer teams to be able to learn quickly and use properly.

Getting all entries to use the championship software means that it will become possible to enforce a rev limit simply and quickly. Reducing the complexity of the software could be a process which takes several years to accomplish.

The real victory of the agreement is that from 2016, MotoGP will have a single set of rules again. There will be one category, with everyone running under the same rules: spec software, 24 liters of fuel, 12 engines.

As of 2014, the extra bike in Parc Ferme will disappear, the best Open bike only appearing in Parc Ferme if it gets onto the front row during qualifying or the podium during the race. From 2016, that question won’t even be asked, as there will only be a single, MotoGP class again. The full text of the press release from the FIM appears below:

FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix

Decision of the Grand Prix Commission

The Grand Prix Commission, composed of Messrs. Carmelo Ezpeleta (Dorna, Chairman), Ignacio Verneda (FIM Executive Director, Sport), Herve Poncharal (IRTA) and Takanao Tsubouchi (MSMA), in an electronic meeting held on 18 March 2014 in Qatar, unanimously approved the following matters concerning the MotoGP class.

  1. The Championship ECU and software will be mandatory for all entries with effect from 2016.All current and prospective participants in the MotoGP class will collaborate to assist with the design and development of the Championship ECU software.During the development of the software a closed user web site will be set up to enable participants to monitor software development and to input their suggested modifications.
  2. With immediate effect, a Manufacturer with entries under the factory option who has not achieved a win in dry conditions in the previous year, or new Manufacturer entering the Championship, is entitled to use 12 engines per rider per season (no design freezing), 24 litres of fuel and the same tyres allocation and testing opportunities as the Open category. This concession is valid until the start of the 2016 season.
  3. The above concessions will be reduced under the following circumstances:Should any rider, or combination of riders nominated by the same Manufacturer, participating under the conditions of described in clause 2 above, achieve a race win, two second places or three podium places in dry conditions during the 2014 season then for that Manufacturer the fuel tank capacity will be reduced to 22 litres. Furthermore, should the same Manufacturer achieve three race wins in the 2014 season the manufacturer would also lose the right to use the soft tyres available to Open category entries.In each case the reduced concessions will apply to the remaining events of the 2014 season and the whole of the 2015 season.

Source: FIM

This article was originally published on MotoMatters, and is republished here on Asphalt & Rubber with permission by the author.

Comment:

  1. David says:

    All that matters is if there is close racing this year.

    If not, and we only have one brand winning everything, then they can throw all these rules out the window and start over again.

  2. L2C says:

    According to the article just updated over at Crash dot net, Honda and Yamaha didn’t gain anything other than permission to continue using their own proprietary ECU software until the start of the 2016 season. Crash’s article states:

    “Until 2016 Honda and Yamaha will continue to develop their own bespoke software for use with the standard ECU hardware, mandatory for all from this season. Honda and Yamaha riders will face the previously stated 20 litres of race fuel, five engine changes for the year and a ban on in-season engine development.”

    Seems to me Honda and Yamaha are actually being harshly penalized for being holdouts because Ducati now gets to continue using its own proprietary ECU software instead of being forced to use the Championship ECU software. Ducati makes out like a bandit.

    The other question I had that was answered by Crash’s article is that Honda and Yamaha have been prevented from getting the same benefits as Ducati by virtue of last year’s performance, and if HRC and YFR each bag more than 3 wins this year, in 2014, they won’t be eligible for any of the Open category benefits next year in 2015.

    These rules are in place purely to reward Ducati for being losers. Oh, yeah, and as a secondary provision for Suzuki and Aprilia. Mainly for Ducati, though.

  3. L2C says:

    “The real victory of the agreement is that from 2016, MotoGP will have a single set of rules again. There will be one category, with everyone running under the same rules: spec software, 24 liters of fuel, 12 engines.”

    I don’t see this mentioned in the rules, David. Also don’t see any mention of a Factory 2 category, as your headline states.

  4. Norm G. says:

    re: “if HRC and YFR each bag more than 3 wins this year, in 2014, they won’t be eligible for any of the Open category benefits next year in 2015.”

    but HRC and YEC aren’t in the OC. Martinez and Cruzari are bike world beggars same as the rest of us. they manufacture nothing.

  5. Norm G. says:

    re: “With Ducati now back as a Factory Option entry (but with the advantages of the Open category) they are once again free to use their own software”

    wait, they can use their software now too…? OMG, my head’s spinning.

    here’s an idea for an IPHONE APP…? ffs, create me something that keeps score of all this.

  6. Mark says:

    If they are going to use spec software, limit fuel, limit revs, and limit number of engines, can they simplify the engine configuration rules? Allow any engine configuration, as long as you meet fuel, rev, and engine number limits. Maybe then we will see something interesting and different.

  7. Norm G. says:

    re: “The real victory of the agreement is that from 2016, MotoGP will have a single set of rules again.”

    breaking news, that’s not a victory. actually it’s a repeat of the same fail we saw with CRT. it’s one thing to think up an ideal…? it’s another thing to achieve it. example, the following are all “ideals” man has thought up, has been going hammer and tongs at, but still has yet to achieve…

    world peace, cold fusion, cure for cancer, the longer lasting chemical battery, etc.

    on my authority, you may now add “MotoGP common rules” to this lofty list of unachievables.

  8. Norm G. says:

    re: “Maybe then we will see something interesting and different.”

    you can’t hope to see different, till you at least legislate “different”. Audi’s just announced a full court press upon the OC. Sacchi wants to know where’s his “Audi”…?

  9. Norm G. says:

    ps: don’t say his driveway.

  10. L2C says:

    “but HRC and YEC aren’t in the OC. Martinez and Cruzari are bike world beggars same as the rest of us. they manufacture nothing.”

    Right. My question was would HRC and YFC be able to join the Open category in 2015. Apparently not, since the new rules are written specifically for Ducati’s benefit — who also get to keep using their own factory ECU software. (Yeah, my head is spinning on that one too.) Also, secondarily, the rules allow for Suzuki’s entrance in 2015. There is now no more Factory 2 to go to — for any manufacturer. The Open category is now specifically for privateers less the Factory Satellite teams.

    So — even if HRC and YFR wanted to enter the Open category, they cannot. They have to wait until the start of 2016 to compete on the same terms with Ducati. (Apparently the deadline was sometime yesterday.) And, again, I haven’t seen anything that states what the single set of 2016 Championship rules would be.

    “The real victory of the agreement is that from 2016, MotoGP will have a single set of rules again. There will be one category, with everyone running under the same rules: spec software, 24 liters of fuel, 12 engines.”

    I don’t know where David Emmett got that. It needs an explanation.

  11. L2C says:

    HRC, YFC, YFR, KFC — it’s all the same.

  12. L2C says:

    And I don’t think that Honda or Yamaha has ever had a set of rules that were written specifically for either team. This is some new sh-t with Dorna offering such tailored concession to a single manufacturer. Ducati.

    Gigi “Palapatine” Dall’Igna. Or Darth Sidious Dall’Igna, if you like.

  13. L2C says:

    I also don’t know why David Emmett is referring to the updated regulations as Factory 2 rules. This term is no longer used in the updated rules. It’s not used on the MotoGP website either. The new rules are simply referred to as “updated regulations.” The Factory 2 class no longer exists in concept.

    This makes the updated regulations all the more bewildering, because how can a Factory option team get such special treatment? If anything, Honda and Yamaha should at least be allowed to develop their engines throughout the 2014 and 2015 seasons with the testing benefits.

    Seriously, this announcement boggles my mind. At first glance, it seemed like no big deal, but it’s actually even more of a big deal than the previous Factory 2 proposal.

    Crazy.

  14. Frank says:

    Seems to me Honda and Yamaha are actually being harshly penalized for being holdouts because Ducati now gets to continue using its own proprietary ECU software instead of being forced to use the Championship ECU software. Ducati makes out like a bandit.

    The other question I had that was answered by Crash’s article is that Honda and Yamaha have been prevented from getting the same benefits as Ducati by virtue of last year’s performance, and if HRC and YFR each bag more than 3 wins this year, in 2014, they won’t be eligible for any of the Open category benefits next year in 2015.

    @L2C – My thoughts exactly. Ducati was tecnhincally already using their factory software with the factory 2 option but now they won’t have to deal with Magnetti Marelli’s consideration of the input of other teams towards updates and applications of the software to benefit the whole Open class throughout the season (None of the open teams were even able to use Ducati’s software in the first place). So, yeah it’s officially ok for Ducati to go on factory-business as usual with 24 ltrs of fuel, softer option tires and the ability to modify their engines throughout the season. What a crock of s**t honestly. And HRC and YAM won’t have this option because they will be busy getting results with the fuel restrictions and engine allocation that ‘factory’ teams are supposed to adhere to. So yeah – it’s a handicap in favor of Ducati. Even with the Factory 2 option – they still will have more fuel and more engines.

    As a fan, I’m not opposed to more competitive racing but this is just silly. Why potentially change the outcome of a season/championship with an advantaged Ducati that won’t be the same bike throughout the season given it’s results. What I am getting at is – championship points count. What if Dovi is on the podium in the first 2 races and then they limit his bike/fuel/tires etc from that point on and he falls back to 6th-9th for the rest of the season where you’d imagine the Duc to be? He has already altered the championship and pulled points from other riders who are operating within the actual restrictions of the factory. If Lorenzo, MM, Pedrosa or Rossi are left off of the podium due to Ducati’s early advantage and miss out on the championship by a handful of points that would be an unfortunate by-product of the mess these ‘rules’ have made. And yes, I realize- that it will be nice to see some new faces on the podium this year and in the future, but Dovi does not beat any of those riders on equal equipment so it would be obvious where the results came from. To be honest – from what I’ve seen of the GP14 so far, Ducati has made some noticeable improvements over last year considering the pre season test results. These advantages might just push it into the top 5. Who knows? Probably won’t make much difference, but still – rules are stacked in Ducati’s favor this year. And I don’t mention Cal because I think he will struggle this year. Dovi bested him head to head on the Tech3 M1 and has more experience on the Duc.

  15. soooo says:

    so what is a ducati? who decides that a bike is a “ducati” is or which team is a factory team?
    So, it would be enough to outrun these rules by simply changing the name of team after every season (or found the old team as a new one, but it is still the same) and changing the name of all of the bikes on the grid… Ducati GP14, Ducati2 GP14, Ducati3 GP14 … suddendly the rules would not affect them. You can not. To assume that they just disguised their teams and bikes would be unfair by the rules…

  16. Norm G. says:

    re: “KFC”

    lol.

  17. n/a says:

    …..Awaits Honda’s announcement that they’ll no longer compete in MotoGP after 2015……

    ……..Hopes it will be followed by Yamaha’s announcement to pull out too.

    F**k Dorna/MotoGP series and their stupid rules.

  18. Adrian says:

    Any racing series which requires such unnatural manipulation is clearly broken.

  19. Naeem says:

    2014 rules are effectively Dorna and Ducati stroking each other. Ending up with everyone else having to bend over. Smacks of Italian patriotism, but it could also be because Dorna is the proverbial headless chicken.

  20. The Brain says:

    All the blah blah blah in the comments shows how easy it is to confuse, the average fan. Let me see if I can clear this up.

    2014 rules were set and months ago

    Ducati decides to go with the Open option by the deadline (Dorna’s end-game, everyone run the Open option). Honda/Yam/Sat teams could have elected to the same option.

    Honda/other teams cry (after the deadline).

    Dorna (lastmin) decides to penalize Ducati, and proposes Factory 2 (after the deadline)

    w/out factory level electronics, meeting the fuel restriction was impossible. Unless power is cut significantly

    Dorna wants integrates Ducati back into the “factory” w/ revised factory 2 restrictions

    Why all this drama? Ducati played their hand according to the original 2014 rule book. After the known/agreed upon deadline, Dorna are attempting to pacify teams that didn’t…

  21. L2C says:

    **”Dorna (lastmin) decides to penalize Ducati, and proposes Factory 2 (after the deadline)

    w/out factory level electronics, meeting the fuel restriction was impossible. Unless power is cut significantly…”**

    And as such, that would be a factor in Ducati’s engineering challenge in redesigning and rebuilding its bikes. The other manufacturers have responded well to the engineering challenge that Ducati once agreed to, Ducati hasn’t fared nearly as well. Don’t get it confused, Ducati’s lack of competitiveness are the reason for this mess with the rules.

    The fact that a Factory Option team gets special treatment, to the extent that Ducati has, is crock of you know what horses do. The Factory 2 proposal was understandable because it at least singled out Ducati for what was really going on with their attempt to game the Open category rules. The proposal highlighted why it was a bad idea for everyone that a Manufacturer should be able to take advantage of those rules. This latest development, however, extends the matter to a whole new scandalous level of epic proportions.

    Ducati is now still considered a Factory Option team, and it now gets to use its own proprietary ECU software in addition to gaining all of the benefits of the Open Class. Under the previous Factory 2 proposal, Ducati was limited to using the Championship ECU software, of which Ducati made a significant contribution towards the 2014 version. This is what triggered the complaints from the Open Class teams and Honda and Yamaha. The Open Class teams decided unanimously to use the 2013 version of the Championship ECU software because the 2014 version was too complex and too expensive to use, which made it beneficial only to Ducati who would be using the 2014 version. These are the reasons why the Factory 2 proposal was made in the first place.

    How can a Factory Option team –Ducati– still be allowed to take advantage of all the benefits afforded to the Open Class teams while continuing to use its own proprietary ECU software? Software that has absolutely nothing to do with the 2013 or 2014 Championship ECU software?

    In case you hadn’t noticed, Braniac, that shows you that there are indeed two sets of Factory Option rules. One set that is specifically for Honda and Yamaha. The other set specifically for Ducati. Count Dooku and the separatists would be proud.

    Count Dookull’Igna?

    I would ask since when does a Factory Option team stand to get its own set of special rules, but clearly the answer to that question is since yesterday. This is a genuine, dyed-in-the-wool “Whatchoo talkin’ ’bout Willis?” moment in MotoGP.

    **”Why all this drama? Ducati played their hand according to the original 2014 rule book. After the known/agreed upon deadline, Dorna are attempting to pacify teams…”**

    Yeah, and reward Ducati even more concessions for deciding to go Open, even though it was never actually allowed to? Ducati was never officially granted the privilege of entering the Open category; Ducati had a strong case for arguing to Dorna and the GPC why it should have been granted permission, but the team was never allowed. To avoid that legal conflict was another reason why the Factory 2 proposal made. And now we have … THIS?!?

    Ugh. Dorna should have told Ducati that it would only be allowed to use the 2013 Championship ECU software. All the teams, including Honda and Yamaha, would have then been more or less equally catered to. As it stands now, Dookati gets everything and everyone else gets nothing more.

    That ain’t right.

  22. Frank says:

    @ The Brian – I think you are the one who is confused by all of this. The result of the rule changes over the past few weeks are simple: Ducati is running 3 factory bikes with their own software -NOT Magnetti Marelli ‘Open-class mediated’ software. They get 24 liters of fuel, an option for the softer Open tire and 12 engines with the ability to work on those engines throughout the season. Even if they get results and are then ‘penalized’ they still enjoy 2 more liters of fuel and the ability to work on their engines. If you don’t see how this is an advantage over the other factories and why they would be upset then I got nothin. They are a full factory entry with Open advantages. And they are actually called FACTORY.

    The most recent reasoning for this decided advantage was based on a factory team having not won a dry race in the previous 3 MotoGP seasons. That is straight from Dorna’s rules. It is ALL about Ducati’s lack of success. That is exactly why they are being given these concessions. People that are saying that HRC and YAM are crying seem to be unable to put themselves in those shoes. Ducati just got a bunch of concessions for the season precisely because their bike has been such a turd. It’s all about the spectacle- I get it. But then running away with this thought process – why not have different allowances/concessions/restrictions for each team relative to their success? If it’s all about evening up the grid, then make restrictions on the fly throughout the season that way no one rider can dominate the class and no team can languish in the middle of the pack.

  23. AllllrightyThen says:

    This is the reason Casey Stoner will NEVER comeback!!! These tools have destroyed this series. It all started with the CRT garbage.

  24. The Brain says:

    “I don’t want to stir up the controversy, I’ll strictly stick to the facts. I would like to understand in which section of the rule book it is written that the Open should be a ‘low cost’ option.”

    “The rule book went public months ago and, as I said, we respected it. It doesn’t say the Open category is limited to privateer teams. Truth to tell, considering how the rules have been written, it looks more a singularity the Factory option than the Open one. To have the chance to develop their own software, they have to submit to limited engines and fuel”.

    -Paolo Ciabatti, Ducati Corse

  25. SPSBill says:

    L2C… are you going to piss and moan about ANY bike that might have a chance of beating a factory Honda and Yamaha or just Ducati? Enough with the whining.

  26. Mike says:

    I don’t understand why some of the commenters are down on Ducati. They followed the rules when they chose Open, which is what Dorna openly said they wanted, no “Factory Option” teams. They followed the rules when they gave suggestions to Magneti Marelli, then didn’t pass over software, just gave them a list of the requested functions. Both Yamaha and Haonda could have done both, but they decided not to (because they wanted to use their own software AND keep it secret) and assumed that Ducati wouldn’t either even though all the media outlets were saying Ducati would go Open for months. Ducati followed all the rules and people say dumb stuff like “Ducati just got a bunch of concessions for the season precisely because their bike has been such a turd.” Honda and Yamaha could of had the EXACT same “concessions” that Ducati got by following the rules. The people who are complainig about Ducati for following every posted rule are just Japanese Factory apologists and whiners. Yamaha and Honda undoubtedly saw the advantage of the Open class (which the Factories eventually HAVE to compete in), but chose not to for commercial reasons. If the media, such as DE, are to be believed the Factories didn’t even complain about Ducati joining the Open class, but it was the privateers who did. And since the new set were agreed upon unanimously at least one of the Japanese Factories also agreed to the above rules. I think Ducati should have been allowed to stay completely Open all season. It really annoys me when poor losers whine when they don’t take advantage of the rules. It’d be like Kawasaki coming in with an 800cc engine and complaining about the others using 1000 cc. It’s just ridiculous to think that Ducati would intentionally handicap themselves to appease a bunch of whining armchair team principals on forums. Motorsport has always been about getting the most that you can out of the rules, not volunteering to bring sub-par equipment to satisfy someone commenting on an internet blog. If you can’t understand the idea of exploiting a formula, which all racing is, perhaps you shouldn’t be competing or spectating.

  27. Wolf says:

    I am for some of it, against the rest.
    But i am the only that this WHOLE Ducati thing could have simply been fixed with this:
    - more engines in the year until a win (which then reduced for next year and so on)
    - unlimited testing until they “catch up”
    - all the other rules apply.
    That’s it.
    (same for Suzuki)
    The funny thing is, Honda having a big cry over something they will end up having to give up in 2016 is pointless. IF they have agreed to the new rules, and earlier… then when not just do it now and be even Steven?
    The only thing i can think of is that they will push as hard as they can for 2 championships, get the titles and development for the brand, then possibly leave and others follow.
    Who knows.
    They’re a funny lot too.
    Screw it!… bring on Qatar!!!!

  28. L2C says:

    @ The Brain

    “I don’t want to stir up the controversy, I’ll strictly stick to the facts. I would like to understand in which section of the rule book it is written that the Open should be a ‘low cost’ option.”

    “The rule book went public months ago and, as I said, we respected it. It doesn’t say the Open category is limited to privateer teams. Truth to tell, considering how the rules have been written, it looks more a singularity the Factory option than the Open one. To have the chance to develop their own software, they have to submit to limited engines and fuel”.

    -Paolo Ciabatti, Ducati Corse

    You think you will ever hear Paolo Ciabatti say those words again now that Ducati are officially the paddock’s special-needs Factory team? They are quite an exceptional bunch, that Ducati.

  29. L2C says:

    @SPSBill

    “L2C… are you going to piss and moan about ANY bike that might have a chance of beating a factory Honda and Yamaha or just Ducati? Enough with the whining.”

    There are Factory Option rules — and then there are special Factory Option rules for Ducati. Call it what it is: Nonsense.

  30. L2C says:

    @ Wolf

    “I think Ducati should have been allowed to stay completely Open all season. It really annoys me when poor losers whine when they don’t take advantage of the rules. It’d be like Kawasaki coming in with an 800cc engine and complaining about the others using 1000 cc. It’s just ridiculous to think that Ducati would intentionally handicap themselves to appease a bunch of whining armchair team principals on forums. Motorsport has always been about getting the most that you can out of the rules, not volunteering to bring sub-par equipment to satisfy someone commenting on an internet blog. If you can’t understand the idea of exploiting a formula, which all racing is, perhaps you shouldn’t be competing or spectating.”

    All of this is now irrelevant. Ducati are a Factory Option team.

    “And since the new set were agreed upon unanimously at least one of the Japanese Factories also agreed to the above rules.”

    Indeed. Kind of makes your point about those arguing about the absurdity of the rules being apologists and whiners pointless, now doesn’t it?

    “If the media, such as DE, are to be believed the Factories didn’t even complain about Ducati joining the Open class, but it was the privateers who did.”

    The privateers agreed unanimously to only use the 2013 version of the Championship ECU software, and the privateers unanimously rejected the option to use the 2014 version that Ducati contributed to. Nothing speaks louder than votes and solidarity.

  31. L2C says:

    Sorry, Wolf, that previous response was for Mike. Oops.

  32. L2C says:

    “Screw it!… bring on Qatar!!!!”

    Yes, indeed.

  33. The Brain says:

    Ducati had two options. One, development freeze. The other, no development freeze. “Gi” (see what I did there), I wonder which one they will choose (which is the direction GP is headed anyway)? L2C, you just have a hard-on for Ducati that is preventing you from seeing past your own nose.

    End of the Day, my man A.Espagaro have HRC and Yam Factory sweating.

  34. L2C says:

    @ The Wet Noodle

    It inevitably comes to personal attacks when you have nothing left worth saying, doesn’t it? Don’t blame me for recognizing it.