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Episode 74 of the Two Enthusiasts Podcast is out, and it covers a busy schedule at the 2EP HQ.

First off, we talk about Harley-Davidson’s investment in Alta Motors, and discuss what the future holds for these two American brands. The conversation shifts from the future, to the past, and also examines Harley-Davidson’s management of Buell and MV Agusta, which makes for an interesting contrast.

The conversation then turns to two pieces of equipment that we see shaking up the motorcycle apparel space: the Dainese D-Air Misano jacket and the Sena Momentum helmet. Both of these pieces are bringing new technology to the industry, and we’ve had a chance to spend some miles on both of them.

The show then covers what it’s like to ride the Triumph Speed Triple RS and Triumph Tiger 800 XCA, as Jensen was in Spain and Moab (respectively) riding these two British bikes.

We finish too with another quasi-review, as Carlin Dunne was down at the Alta Motors Redshift MXR launch, riding Alta’s new electric dirt bike and relaying his thoughts back to Asphalt & Rubber.

You can listen to the show via the embedded SoundCloud player, after the jump, or you can find the show on iTunes (please leave a review) or this RSS feed. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well.

We hope you will join the conversation, and leave us some audio comments at our new email address: twoenthusiasts@gmail.com.

Triumph looks set to update its ADV range, as the British marque is teasing a new Tiger adventure bike in its latest YouTube video.

Touting that the three-cylinder platform has been “transformed” and is packed with more “technology”, Triumph’s teaser is deliciously vague.

What we do know is that Triumph has fallen behind greatly with its modern motorcycles, with the Hinckley brand hyper-focused on its heritage lineup of Bonneville variants.

As such, the Triumph Tiger 800 has remained largely the same, since its 2010 debut, though was updated in 2015 with an improved engine, ride-by-wire, and traction control. The Tiger Explorer 1200 on the other hand was released in 2012, and given modest updates for the 2016 model year.

Both machines however have been overcome by continued pressure from other brands in the middleweight and heavyweight ADV categories, with BMW, Ducati, and KTM all releasing competing models that have been refreshed since the Tigers’ inception date.

Hopefully this teaser video signals that we will see Triumph’s entire lineup overhauled for the 2018 model year. It desperately needs it.

Triumph is recalling a number of its models for faulty engine control units (ECUs), which may improperly activate the bikes’ fuel injectors.

The recall affects the 2014 and 2015 model year Triumph Thunderbird, Thunderbird ABS, Tiger 800,Tiger 800 ABS, Thruxton, and Bonneville motorcycles manufactured between February 6, 2014 and August 7, 2014.

It’s not clear how many total motorcycles this recall affects, as Triumph lists the number currently as “0” with NHTSA, but given the number of models involved and the wide timeframe given on the production dates, we would expect a massive number of motorcycles to be involved.

Triumph seems set to debut four more variants of its Tiger 800, as CARB filings filings show a Tiger 800 XCA, Tiger 800 XCX, Tiger 800 XRT, and Tiger 800 XRX models for the 2015 model year. The news seems to show Triumph spreading out its middleweight ADV offering, giving on-road and off-road riders a bit more to choose from the British brand. Helping us understand how Triumph sees the four added variants, Motorcycle.com has publish a chart (above), which Triumph sent to Tiger 800 owners as a part of its market research. That chart breaks down the various models’ spec, and which features that would come with as standard. Noticeable across the board is that the three-cylinder gets a 15% MPG boost, as well as ABS and traction control as standard features.

Triumph has issued recalls for both 2011-2012 model variants of the Tiger 800, as well as the 2011-2012 Sprint GT, for a defective top box locking mechanism. Missing a clip on the locking mechanism handle, there is a possibility that the top box may unintentionally detach from the motorcycle, and cause an accident with another vehicle. To remedy the situation, Triumph will have dealers install a new fitment clip, which will better align the rack and pinion mechanism to prevent accidental disengagement. Affecting 134 units in total, Triumph plans on having the recall being in August 2011. Concerned Triumph Tiger 800 and Triumph Sprint GT owners can contact Triumph Customer Service at 1-678-539-8782, and as always the NHTSA is available at 1-888-327-4236 and www.safercar.gov. Source: NHTSA

Well it didn’t take long for news of Triumph’s pricing information for the United States to surface, after the European pricing came out last week. Announced to Triumph dealers in the United States, the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 will hit dealership floors with a MSRP of $9,999, while the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 XC will cost $10,999. ABS for both Tigere 800 models will be an additional $800 option.

Compare that to the BMW F650GS (still an 800cc motorcycle mind you), which has a base price of $9,255 ($10,155 with ABS), and the BMW F800GS’s starting price of $11,395 ($12,295 if you want ABS). We’ll let you decide how Triumph has positioned itself against the two BMW’s, but also bear in mind that it’s hard to find a BMW without the standard options package (a $1,500 package that includes ABS, heated grips, and a ride computer).

UPDATE: British pricing has come in at £7,149 for the Tiger 800, and £7,749 for the Tiger 800 XC. The optional ABS package is an additional £600. For reference the base BMW F800GS costs £7,780.00 MSRP OTD.

While pricing in the United States still is yet to be determined, Triumph has set its base MSRP for the Tiger 800 & Tiger 800 XC for the Italian market (and presumably the European market as well), which sheds some light on how much we can expect to pay here in the US. According to information sent to Triumph dealers in Italy, the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 will cost €8,990, while the the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 XC will cost €9,990.

Abroad this means Triumph is taking a stab at BMW, and pricing the Tiger 800 below the F800GS (€10,500 MSRP), which should translate into a similar segment positioning here in the United States. It is hard to guess exactly how Triumph will price the Tiger 800 and Tiger 800 XC in America exactly, as Triumph’s international pricing structure is a bit more convoluted than other manufacturers, but we expect to see the Triumph Tiger 800 XC priced just under $10,000. More on that as we get it.

Triumph has been teasing us for months about its new Tiger 800 & Tiger 800 XC adventure motorcycles, and now finally the wait is over as both bikes have debuted at EICMA. Centered around a three-cylinder 799cc motor, the Triumph Tiger 800 & Triumph Tiger 800 XC make 95hp and 58 lbs•ft of torque, which will likely come as a disappointment for many who were expecting more out of the stroked Daytona lump. Things get worse as the Tiger 800 tips the scales 463 lbs at the curb, while the Tiger 800 XC weighs in at 474 lbs, making both bikes comparatively heavy and underpowered to their middleweight adventure bike counterparts.

On the positive side, both bikes have a adjustable seat height and handlebars, while the Tiger 800 gets a 19″ front rim and the Tiger 800 XC gets a more dirt-worthy 21″ front wheel. Both bikes have an optional ABS package that can be disabled, which will make off-roaders happy, while the 5 gallon fuel tank should make long trips easier for the road warriors, and extend how far into the boonies one can adventure.

After a single photo of the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 XC made its way onto the interwebs last week, we finally have the full set of pictures from that photo shoot, along with action shots of the Tiger Triumph 800, and studio shots of both bikes. The two Tiger 800’s are essentially the same beasts underneath their slightly different exteriors, but the most obvious differences gleaned from these photos is the Triumph Tiger 800’s shorter length forks compared to the Tiger 800 XC’s, which obviously have to accomodate a larger-sized wheel (21″ compared to the road-going 800’s 19″ wheel). Optional accessories seem to include fog lights, skid guards, crash bars, and an Arrow exhaust system.

A British couple has seemingly caught the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 out in the wild, flying down the road doing 100 mph or so. Finally catching up to the bike at a gas station, the savvy duo snapped this photo, and put it on the interwebs for all to see (nice of them, huh?). The photo doesn’t really reveal too much about the road-going version of the new Tiger 800 that we don’t already know, but we do get a good look at the bike’s side profile. Clad with a 19″ front wheel, steal frame, and stroked three-cylinder motor, the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 looks to be blast down pot-hole laden roadways. Expect more details in a few weeks when the bike debuts at EICMA alongside the 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 XC. Source: BMW Sport Touring Forum via MotoBlog.it