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BMW Motorrad has finally revealed its pricing for the BMW S1000RR in the US market (read our ride review here), and the price tag should excite superbike riders. First, the good news: the 2020 BMW S1000RR comes with a $16,999 MSRP.

The bad news is of course that it is almost impossible to ever get a BMW model at the base price listed, as they are virtually never imported into the US, with instead the motorcycles coming decked-out in their optional packages.

But even then, BMW Motorrad USA has surprised us with this machine’s offering in the Land of the Free.

European pricing for the Yamaha Ténéré 700 has finally hit, and while the United States still have over a year of waiting for when this mid-sized ADV bike will hit our soil, the price details gives us an indication of what to expect from Yamaha’s “T7” motorcycle.

Depending on what country of the European Union we are talking about, pricing for the Yamaha Ténéré 700 is set in the mid 9000s. For example in Italy, the Yamaha Ténéré 700 is priced at €9,490.

The middleweight adventure-touring segment is hot right now, with a bevy of brands bringing new machines to market right now.

Leading that charge has been KTM, with the company finally releasing its two-pronged ADV attack with the KTM 790 Adventure and KTM 790 Adventure R motorcycles.

Packed with features, and touted to have high-performance, we knew the KTM was going to get aggressive on the pricing of its 790 models, and now we know how aggressive those price tags will be in the USA.

With pricing leaked on the KTM Twins forum, we can see that the KTM 790 Adventure will cost $12,499 MSRP, while the KTM 790 Adventure R will come in at $13,499 MSRP.

The Triumph Scrambler 1200 is one of the more interesting motorcycles to debut for the 2019 model year, with the British brand continuing to push its heritage lineup, now with a more capable off-road scrambler machine.

Coming in two trim levels, the 2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC is the more street-focused bike, while the 2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE is the more dual-sport minded machine.

While the Brits were wise to segment their newest two-wheel offering, the biggest factor for the Triumph Scrambler 1200’s success will be the price points it is offered at in the US market. The bad news: it won’t be cheap.

It is an odd passion in life, but I find the international pricing schemes by various motorcycle manufacturers to be simply fascinating.

While this will surely mean that I will die alone (so very, very alone), this odd curiosity is bringing up some interesting thoughts about the new BMW S1000RR superbike.

And the signs point to the Bavarian brand’s newest liter bike costing quite the pretty penny in the US market. Let me explain.

If you happen to find yourself desiring the Ducati Panigale V4 R superbike (we can hardly blame you for such thoughts), then you better start figuring out which kidney you like the least, as the 998cc V4 rocket machine will cost quite the pretty penny in the United States.

This is because the Ducati Panigale V4 R is priced at $40,000 MSRP for the 2019 model year, in the pricing details that our Bothan spies have passed along to us.

That figure for the Ducati Panigale V4 R mimics the €39,900 price tag in Europe, which comes right up to the limit of the WorldSBK homologation requirements, which cap bikes at €40,000. In the UK, this pre-Brexit price on the Panigale V4 R will be £34,995.

When the Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled debuted, I said that this was the scrambler model the Bologna should have released first. Built actually to go off-road, it is the real scrambler in Ducati’s Scrambler lineup.

Now, I have a feeling that in a few months’ time I’m going to be saying this phrase again about a different bike, as there are some rumors floating in the Bothan Spy network that an 1,079cc version of the Desert Sled is set to debut for the 2019 model year.

This supposed Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled 1100 (try saying name that three times fast) will add to the Scrambler 1100 lineup from Ducati, adding some off-road prowess to a family of bikes that is really just a reworked Ducati Monster 1100.

Fancy yourself the new Ducati Panigale V4? It’s going to cost you a pretty penny if you do, as pricing for the USA and Europe has been revealed, and the 215hp superbike is not going cheaply into that good night.

As such, Ducati lists 2018 pricing for the Panigale V4 as €22,590 in Europe, with pricing in the US set at $21,195 for the base model. For those keeping score, this is a premium of $1,200 over the outgoing Ducati 1299 Panigale.

When you get to the Panigale V4 S though, things start getting considerably more expensive. European pricing on the Ducati Panigale V4 S is set at €27,890, while pricing for the USA will be $27,495.

For the American market, this is a $1,700 bump on pricing when compared to the 2017 Ducati 1299 Panigale.

Before the machine officially debuted in China, we got our first taste of the carbon-clad BMW HP4 Race at the 2016 EICMA Show in Milan. At that time, all we knew about this track-only motorcycle was that it would be built in limited quantities, and thus would not be cheap.

In China, we learned that pricing across “the pond” had been set at £68,000 / €80,000 for the UK and EU markets, respectively. And now, we finally get word regarding how much the BMW HP4 Race will cost American buyers, as BMW Motorrad USA has set an asking price of $78,000.

The naked sport bike segment continues to push into larger displacements, with the Kawasaki Z800 turning into the all-new 2017 Kawasaki Z900. With that change in number comes an obviously new 948cc inline-four engine, slung into a light-weight trellis frame, amongst other improvements.

For the marquee differences between the machines, the Kawasaki Z900 brings with it a 13hp power increase to 124hp, and a weight reduction of over 50 lbs, for a curb weight of 458 lbs (non-ABS).

For creature comforts, the 2017 Kawasaki Z900 comes with assist and slipper clutch, with optional ABS brakes. Priced at an aggressive $8,399 ($8,799 for the ABS model) though, that tradeoff comes from the Z900 being sans any advanced electronics and high-spec components.

When Erik Buell Racing shutdown last year, the American sport bike manufacturer had bikes sitting on its assembly line, waiting to be completed and shipped to dealers. This was a point of fact that Erik Buell touted when EBR went into receivership, as a way of showing how easily EBR could restart its business quickly.

This statement of course failed to take into account that dealers were struggling to sell the bikes they already had on their showroom floors, and few (if any) were interested in receiving more units from Erik Buell Racing.

Part of the reason EBR had such a hard time selling motorcycles was because of the pricing on the EBR 1190RS, EBR 1190RX, and EBR 1190SX – all of which were priced against European models that had more features, technology, and craftsmanship.

Now under the ownership of Liquid Asset Partners (LAP), Erik Buell Racing is again selling its machines for the 2016 model year, though now the company has adopted more reasonable prices. As such, the 2016 EBR 1190SX and EBR 1190RX will cost $12,995 and $13,995, respectively.