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This 1956 Ariel Square 4 features a matching Garrard sidecar (stocked with Champagne!). If you take a quick glance at this Ariel, you might notice something doesn’t quite look right. This is because tt the heart of the Ariel is a 997cc square-four engine, or “Squariel”, which was designed in 1936 by the unemployed engine designer Edward Turner.







The BSA w32-6 was built mainly for use with a side car, and has a 499cc side-valve motor. BSA’s were so popular in Britain during the 1930’s that one in four motorcycles was built by “Beeza”. This 1932 BSA W32-6 Sidecar was sold as a complete unit, during the height of sidecar popularity in the UK.







This 1913 Premier 3 1/2hp 3 speed motorcycle was the oldest example of British two-wheeled freedom at the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.







In 1922, Triumph needed an update to its motors in order to be competitve in the developing sportbike market. As such, it hired gas flow special Harry Ricardo to improve the performance of the Triumph machinery, and this 1922 Triumph Model R “Ricardo” was one such lucky recipient.







Based on the streetbike version, this 1953 Matchless G45 was an “over-the-counter” race bike that was made available to select British racers. It has a 500cc parallel twin motor from a G9, and in the right hands, was quite successful at winning national races.







The preferred ride in 350cc racing after World War II, the 1949 Velocette Mk. VIII wasn’t the fastest bike on the grid, making only “average” power, but made up this deficincy by utilizing its superior steering and suspension.







Giving birth to the engine’s design, this 1938 Triumph Speed Twin showcases Edward Turners vertical twin motor. With a 498cc, twin overhead valve construction, the Speed Twin made a solid 27hp and was the first truly successful British twin.
Early models were only available in ‘Amaranth red’, and were hand painted with gold pinstripes. The hard-tail and initial girder forks meant that the only real suspension for the rider was the sprung seat. Passengers would have to survive with only a doubly thick pad over the rear fender.

Giving birth to the engine’s design, this 1938 Triumph Speed Twin showcases Edward Turner’s vertical twin motor. With a 498cc, twin overhead valve construction, the Speed Twin made a solid 27hp and was the first truly successful British twin to come to market.







This 1929 Sunbeam Model-90 Road Racer, like many of the motorcycles at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, has an interesting story of its discovery and restoration.







One of only four E-95’s created, the A.J.S. E-95 is a modified version of the A.J.S. E-90 horizontal twin motor, and was called the porcupine because of the spiky cooling fins protruding from the cylinder heads.

Originally designed to be supercharged, those plans had to be scrapped when the FIM banned supercharging in 1946. Despite its reputation for not living up to its hype, a finished Porcupine is valued somewhere north of a $250,000. Pictures and more after the jump.







If you ever wondered what a Honda Goldwing would look like in the 1940’s, here is probably the best example: The 1947 Sunbeam S-7. With its over-sized tires, overhead camshaft motor mounted in rubber, and shaft-driven rear-wheel, the Sunbeam was very sophisticated, but proved to be perhaps too ahead of its time.

The bike is powered by a 500cc in-line twin motor; and like the Model-T, you could get it in any color you wished, as long as it was black.

Considered a touring motorcycle, the S-7 was quiet, smooth, and had modest performance. However, the S-7 was one of those motorcycles that contribute to Britain’s fame of producing unreliable vehicles. Pictures after the jump.













This 1947 Vincent-HRD Series B Rapide Special, with its 998cc motor, has a special story. Named “Gunga Din”, the bike started out like any other standard Series B Rapide, but was quickly recruited by the factory to showcase new parts, and serve as a publicity test ride bike. The bike also served as the beginning point for bike like the Vincent-HRD Black Shadow and Black Lightning race bikes.