Tag

Honda CBR250R

Browsing

The first images are starting to emerge from the Tokyo Motor Show, and already we have some excitement. Naturally one of the items we are most keen to learn more about is the Honda “Light Weight Super Sports” concept, which many are saying is a pre-cursor to a Honda CBR250RR successor. A product from the glory days of small-displacement warfare, the Honda CBR250RR was a screamer of a machine, even by today’s standards, and the CBR250RR made big horsepower from its quarter-liter engine. While the Honda “Light Weight Super Sports” concept may not rev into the stratosphere like the CBR250RR did, reports show that the LCD dash does indicate a 14,000 rpm redline.

When it comes to the small-displacement trend that we’ve seen from manufacturers, Honda’s offering is competent, but lacking when compared to what has come out from Kawasaki, KTM, and Yamaha. If the Honda’s “Light Weight Super Sports” concept (super high-resolution photo above), which will debut at the Tokyo Motor Show, is any indication though, the Japanese manufacturer is about to blow the competition out of the water with what will likely be the Honda CBR250RR. The concept shown has a different chassis from the Honda CBR250R and Honda CBR300R, which bode well for the machine being substantially different from what is on the market now from Honda.

The battlefront in the small-displacement motorcycle war is heating up, as Honda has responded to last year’s debut of the Kawasaki Ninja 300 with its own 300cc sport bike, the 2014 Honda CBR300R. Departing from the looks of the Honda CBR250R, the Honda CBR300R instead gets its styling from the Honda CBR500R that debuted last year at this time. Finally giving us some details since its preview last month, we now know what Honda has added another 37cc to its entry-level spot, as the Honda CBR300R has a 286cc single-cylinder engine, which makes 30hp and 20 lbs•ft of torque. From the way the Japanese are talking, the Honda CBR300R is set to replace the Honda CBR250R worldwide, which means we will see this bike in the United States.

Not content to have only the Honda CBR250R as its small-displacement offering, Honda Motor Corp. announced at the China International Motorcycle Trade Exhibition in Chongqing yesterday that the 2014 Honda CBR300R would be its latest “world model” motorcycle, with production set to start at Honda’s Thailand factory.

Details on the small-displacement motorcycle are next-to-nonexistent, with Seiji Kuraishi, Chief Operating Officer for Honda China simply stating that “Honda is exhibiting the world premiere of the CBR300R, a global motorcycle model for which Honda is planning to begin production in Thailand in the future. The market introduction of this model in China will be discussed in the future.”

This seems to be the year for small-displacement motorcycles, as Big Red has teased its lineup for next season, and announced the 2013 Honda CBR250R Repsol edition. The same fuel-injected single-cylindered bike as before, Honda hopes that its MotoGP racing livery will help dissuade 250cc buyers from thinking green in 2013. Just like the Honda RC213V, the Repsol Honda CBR250R will come without an option for ABS. No word on pricing yet. The Dani Pedrosa jokes start in 3…2…1…

In Japan, Honda has a nice spec-series brewing that features the new Honda CBR250R sport bike. Naturally for the cup race there needs to be a racing version of the CBR250R, and HRC has happily obliged. Nothing too fancy, after all this is supposed to be an entry-level series, but the HRC CBR250R racer features race bodywork sans lights and signals, as well as a fully-adjustable ECU that has come pre-loaded with various HRC fuel and ignition maps. Other goodies include a toggle for different fuel/ignition maps, a quick-shifter, and a pit lane rev-limiter.

Promotion of the 2011 Honda CBR250R continues as Honda has setup a flash-based game (if you can call it that) for users to play its worldwide website. Touring the world on the 250cc entry-level bike, you can pick your color scheme (we were partial to the Tri-Color paint that will never reach American soil) and you can also select from a bevy of anime style avatars. Once you’ve done that, you’re pretty much done with the game, as the rest of the experience involves watching the animated Honda CBR250R go through landscapes that depict landmark features of various countries. While you can slowdown and speed up, you can’t really escape from the horde of other animated riders who pelt you with quotes from Twitter that promote the game (an aggravating experience to say the least). Somewhere along the way you start repeating the countries you’ve seen, and the novelty begins…

American Honda announced today the official pricing on the 2011 Honda CBR250R, the company’s 250cc beginner bike. With base pricing on the CBR250R starting at $3,999, the ABS equipped model will cost an additional $500, with an MSRP of $4,499. This price point goes right after the Kawasaki Ninja 250R, which is also sold for $3,999 MSRP. The Honda tips the scales a full 15 lbs lighter than the Kawi, and is equipped with fuel-injection.

We expect Honda’s strategy with the Mini-Me CBR is to offer more performance and features for the same price as the Kawi, which should make things in this part of the market very interesting (Aprilia is trying to play here too with its 125cc Aprilia RS4 125, which will likely cost more than these two bikes). Photos, video, and technical specifications of the new Honda CBR250R after the jump.

Do not adjust your computer screen, this not a revised version of the VFR1200F, nor is it the V4 adventure bike we expect Honda to debut next week, it’s not even the bastard love child from a CBR and a Cylon, it is in fact the brand new 2011 Honda CBR250R. A 250cc motorcycle for the rest of us, Honda hopes to snag new riders by offering a more practical street bike in the Japanese, European, Australian, and yes, even American markets later this spring.