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If you happen already to own one of the 2017 Ducati 1299 Panigale models, including the recently released Ducati 1299 Panigale R Final Edition and Ducati 1299 Superleggera models, then you already have the latest and greatest electronics suite from the Italian manufacturer, dubbed the Ducati Traction Control EVO (DTC EVO). But, if you own a 2015 or 2016 Panigale, whether it be a “base” model or “S” model, you have been out of luck when it comes to taking full advantage of your bike’s Bosch inertial measurement unit (IMU)…until today. Ducati is announcing that it will retrofit its DTC EVO system for older 1299 Panigale machines, so they can take advantage of IMU’s ability to manage sliding the rear wheel, via a revised algorithm.

As was rumored, Ducati’s flagship machine, the Panigale superbike, gets an update for the 2015 model year. Now called the Ducati 1299 Panigale, the number designation means different things for the base, S, and R models. All three models will sport a class-leading 205 peak horsepower, have the “cornering ABS” thanks to the inertial movement unit (IMU) that is installed, and have the new Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) system, with its up and down clutchless shifting. All three models also have a revised chassis geometry, with the steering head angle set at 24° now, while the fork pivot is 4 mm lower — all in the name of more precise steering (a critique of the 1199 model).

Sorry Ducatisti, there is no Panigale-inspired supersport-class Ducati Superbike this model year, but those Italians have made an update to their sport bike line-up for new year with the 2013 Ducati Superbike 848 EVO Corse SE. Sort of like the 2012 Ducati Superbike 848 EVO Corse SE that was debuted last year at EICMA, this one has an aluminum tank, but with the added bonus of a special two-tone “Ducati Test Team” livery. The Ducati Superbike 848 EVO Corse SE also has Ducati Traction Control, Ducati Quick Shift, an Öhlins rear shock, and upgraded 330mm brake discs. Certainly not what anyone was hoping for from the Bologna brand at INTERMOT, but you have to admit, that’s one dead sexy paint job. Expect the real Ducati goodness to drop next month at EICMA.

Not only is the Ducati 1199 Panigale the lightest production superbike on the market, with its 361 lbs dry weight (414 lbs wet), it’s also one of the most powerful with its 195hp peak power figure, courtesy of the Superquadro motor. Other firsts include a revolutionary monocoque frame, the first full-LED headlight on a motorcycle, the first electronically adjusted suspension on a sport bike, the first engine braking control system, as well as the first GPS-assisted data acquisition system (optional DDA+ package) for a production motorcycle. While traction control comes standard, ABS brakes will also be an optional item for the Ducati 1199 Panigale.

Ducati has just released the first official images of the 2011 Ducati Diavel on its website and Facebook page, thus beginning the teasing process as we lead up to the EICMA show in Milan in three weeks (and confirming the name Diavel in the process). Showing the ass end of the power cruiser, we get our first good glimpse of the carbon tank on the Diavel (rumors are the Ducati Diavel will come in two trim levels). Ducati has also announced that the Diavel will sport ABS, Ducati Traction Contorl, multiple riding modes, and weigh 456lbs.

Along with the loaded 2011 Ducati Superbike 1198 SP, the Bologna factory is helping sell-out its current Superbike line by offering other Ducati Performance parts on its base model Superbike 1198. Keeping the 2011 Ducati Superbike 1198’s price at $16,495 MSRP, Ducati is throwing in its Ducati Traction Control (DTC), Ducati Data Aquisition (DDA), and Ducati Quick Shifter (DCA) systems in for free. Schwing!

If you were previously in the market for a Ducati Superbike 1198 S, but didn’t necessarily need the Öhlins suspension, this could be the bike you’ve been waiting for (although it is hard to turndown the new SP model and its race-ready parts list).

Dubbed the Best Motorcycle of the 2009 EICMA show, the 2010 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring has a lofty title that we’ve been itching to test since we saw the bike debut in Milan last year. While the new Multistrada 1200 comes in many flavors, we somehow managed to get our hands on the Multistrada 1200 S Touring version, or as we like to call it: “King Duc”. The Multistrada line has been Ducati’s attempt to be more than a sportbike-driven brand, and with this latest incarnation we can see that the Bologna-based company has taken a serious stab at making a go-anywhere GS-killer, with Italian style of course.

We were anxious to bring the Multistrada 1200 to our happy hunting grounds in Santa Barbara, CA where we had just recently test ridden the groundbreaking Honda VFR1200F a month back. Our adventures with the new Multi actually began with a very long and boring two-hour drive into Brea, CA on four wheels. Traveling on four wheels in Los Angeles is the stuff suicide notes are made of, and naturally the return trip from Brea was a more pleasurable experience for a certain test rider, than it was for one editor stuck in LA gridlock. Of course that didn’t stop me from having the pleasurable experience of becoming acquainted with the Multistrada 1200 in its natural territory, the open road.

Knowing the sporty nature of Ducati motorcycles (and the seemingly inverse relationship between sportiness and comfort), we were skeptical of how enjoyable the 150-mile ride back from Brea would be on the Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring. Suffering through the almost endless miles of parked cars on the highway that laid between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, I pulled over and sent the first text message back about the bike, “So much fun!!!!” it read, along with a picture of the Multistrada sitting on the side of dead-end road.