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While the consensus on Project Livewire seems to be that it’s a looker, the devil is in the details…and now we have those as well. Featuring a three-phase induction motor with 55 kW of power (just under 74hp) and 52 lbs•ft of torque, the Harley-Davidson Livewire is packing more power than both the Brammo Empulse R (54 hp) and Zero SR (67 hp). That’s the good. The bad is that despite its hefty casing size, the Harley-Davidson Livewire motorcycle is a little light in the loafers when it comes to battery capacity. Our guesstimate on battery pack size, judging from Harley’s quoted charge time and parameters, is somewhere in the neighborhood of 7 kWh nominal, a bit less than the 9.3 kWh and 10.0 kWh of the Brammo and Zero.

Getting ready for the first practice session of the 2011 TTXGP season, the Brammo Empulse RR is on hand at Infineon now we got a chance to take some photos and talk to Director of Product Development Brian Wismann. We already brought you the first photo of the revised Empulse RR, standing in front of the Brammo offices in Ashland, Oregon, where we saw the newly revised race livery (now in Brammo Racing Green). Photos and details of the Brammo Empulse RR after the jump.

After teasing us last week with a video of the new 2012 MV Agusta F4 RR, the Italian company has come out and released official details and photos of the 198hp superbike. Using a shorter-stroke Corsacorta motor, MV Agusta has been able to coax more top-end speed and power from the iconic F4 design. Expected to go on sale in Italy later this month, the F4 RR is carrying with it roughly a 20% premium over the base F4, and will cost €22,900 in that market.

Triumph has been teasing us for months about its new Tiger 800 & Tiger 800 XC adventure motorcycles, and now finally the wait is over as both bikes have debuted at EICMA. Centered around a three-cylinder 799cc motor, the Triumph Tiger 800 & Triumph Tiger 800 XC make 95hp and 58 lbs•ft of torque, which will likely come as a disappointment for many who were expecting more out of the stroked Daytona lump. Things get worse as the Tiger 800 tips the scales 463 lbs at the curb, while the Tiger 800 XC weighs in at 474 lbs, making both bikes comparatively heavy and underpowered to their middleweight adventure bike counterparts.

On the positive side, both bikes have a adjustable seat height and handlebars, while the Tiger 800 gets a 19″ front rim and the Tiger 800 XC gets a more dirt-worthy 21″ front wheel. Both bikes have an optional ABS package that can be disabled, which will make off-roaders happy, while the 5 gallon fuel tank should make long trips easier for the road warriors, and extend how far into the boonies one can adventure.