Tag

Brembo brakes

Browsing

Officially official now, there isn’t much about the 2013 KTM 390 Duke that we don’t already know ahead of the opening of the EICMA show. Built in India by KTM minority shareholder Bajaj, the KTM 390 Duke is a 373cc single-cylinder bike that shares the same chassis as the KTM 125 Duke & KTM 200 Duke. Suitable for Europe’s A2 licensing system, the largest baby Duke competes well against bikes like the Honda CBR500R and Kawasaki Ninja 300, and thus finishes out the Austrian’s bid to control the small-displacement market. Underneath the hood, KTM’s new lump features a short stork cylinder dimension (89mm x 60mm), which is good for 43hp and 26 lbs•ft of torque.

Like the 2013 Triumph Daytona 675, the “R” model of Britain’s three-cylinder supersport has gotten a number of refinements and changes for the new model year. Virtually every aspect of the Triumph Daytona 675 has been seen to, and we won’t rehash those changes here (head over to our article on the base model for the full-monty). Commanding a $1,900 premium over the base model, the 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R adds a TTX rear shock and NIX30 inverted forks to the mix, along with a new quick shifter, higher-spec Brembo monobloc brakes, and some carbon fiber bits. Would we spend the extra green for the Daytona 675R over the base model? Yup, but the better question is whether you would buy the Triumph Daytona 675R over the MV Agusta F3. Decisions, decisions, decisions…

Surely not the update that Gixxer lovers were hoping for, the 2012 Suzuki GSX-R1000 sees a modest retooling as the Japanese company’s liter bike most noticeably goes back to a single exhaust can design. Officially dropping 2kg (4.4 lbs) from its curb weight, we assume the weight savings to the new Suzuki GSX-R1000 can be accounted purely from the new exhaust layout, though Suzuki lists a number of small weight savings throughout the Gixxer’s refined design. Despite a bevy of minor improvements, the big changes include the addition of a beefier midrange, better throttle response, Brembo monoblock calipers with .5mm thinner brake discs, and an improved fuel efficiency by 8%.

I’m going to come out and say that I loved the 2011 Triumph Speed Triple when it came out. A divisive model with the Triumph’s loyal fan base, the revised Speed Triple’s aesthetics are a marked improvement over the earlier generations in my book, which was the only thing that kept the peppy three-cylinder machine out of my personal garage. Now to thoroughly ruining my Christmas wish list, the British brand has added the 2012 Triumph Speed Triple R to its EICMA debut list, with the “R” designation denoting the bike’s upgraded Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, and PVM wheels.