Tag

Bill Warner

Browsing

The motorcycle industry is mourning the loss of Bill Warner today, as the 44-year-old land speed record holder died while attempting to break the 300 mph barrier over the course of a single mile. Racing in the “The Maine Event” at the Loring Air Force Base, Warner’s partially streamlined and turbo-charged Suzuki Hayabusa veered to the right after clearing the one-mile marker, and went off the runway course roughly 2,000 feet later, before ultimately crashing. According to reports, Warner was conscious and communicative after the crash, but he succumbed to his injuries about an hour and fifteen minutes later at a hospital near Caribou, Maine.

Racing his 1,299cc turbo Hayabusa to 311.945 mph, Bill Warner (you may have heard of him) became the first man to break the 300 mph barrier while sitting on a motorcycle. Eeeking close to 312 mph, Warner set the speed at Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine, which has a 2.5 mile concrete runway that serves as the LSR course. With 1.5 miles to hit a top speed, the Loring Timing Association certified Warner’s run, though it would appear that a follow-up pass in the opposite direction was not undertaken, meaning that the speed is not an official FIM land speed record. Don’t let that fact leave you unimpressed though, few riders see a true 200 mph, let alone 300 mph in any direction.

How fast can you go in a standing mile? Well if your name is Bill Warner, you can reach 278.6 MPH from a standing stop in a mile’s distance, and then slowdown in another half-mile of run-off. Helping Warner achieve that impressive feat is a turbocharged 1299cc Suzuki Hayabusa that makes 650hp, which Warner methodically turned the screws on until he beat the previous record at the Texas Mile of 261.5 MPH.

A tropical fish farmer and marine biologist by day, Warner is no fish out of water when it comes to going fast (we apologize for that horrible pun), setting the track records this year at the Maxton, North Carolina (272 mph), Loring, Maine (273 mph) and now Goliad, Texas (278.6 mph). If you think firing a bike off down a straight track is just a matter of twisting the throttle and holding on, we suggest you read Warner’s account of his time at Texas Mile after the jump.