Racing

MotoGP to Return to 990cc Formula?

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When MotoGP switched from the 990cc displacement format to the 800cc formula, it was done so on the idea that it would make the premiere racing class safer for the riders. This proved to not be the case, as the 800cc bikes clearly carried more corner speed through turns, and were still able to approach 990cc top speeds on the straight-aways.

The result, a racing class that was more dangerous and more expensive for manufacturers.With this in mind, Dorna Boss, Carmeloa Ezpeleta, wants to return the series back its previous 990cc format, by as early as 2011.

Making the switch won’t be easy for Ezpeleta, as the manufacturers’ cost of tooling down their race bikes from 990cc to 800cc cost them millions of dollars, a cost that  likely hasn’t been fully absorbed back yet. As such, many teams would be reluctant to make another switch so soon, even if it is to a displacement that they already have experience with racing.







As Ezpeleta explained, the MSMA (Motorcycle Sports Manufacturers Association) has some reprieve from a quick change.

“Right now, it is not going to be possible to switch in 2011, because the agreement with the manufacturers means that we could only make that change before the end of the 2011 season if there was unanimous agreement among the manufacturers. But we are thinking about a return to a 1000cc capacity from the start of the 2012 season, and we will start discussing it this weekend.”

Ezpeleta isn’t the only one wishing for a change in the MotoGP format. FIM President, Vito Ippolito, has been lobbying the fact that MotoGP needs to cut costs, and that he would like to see MotoGP return to a production racing motorcycle format. Also, the IRTA (the association representing the teams), has made it clear it would like a swtich to a larger capacity, preferably modified production motor, racing format.







Source: MotoMatters







Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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