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What do you get when you cross and MV Augusta F4 CC (the 1078cc MV F4 variant) with an MV Augusta F4 R 312 (the MV F4 312kph capable variant)? Well, and MV Augusta F4 with 1078cc’s capable of doing over 312kph. Rated at 190hp, the 1078 is the “racing rules” be damned street bike with Italian flare. The F4 1000 (the current F4 R 312) will function as MV’s race homologated Superbike, meeting all the requirements and specification set down for WSBK competition. Details on the changes, and more pictures after the jump.

Everyone knows that the Ducati Desmosedici is the closest us mortal men will get to riding a true GP bike, and everyone knows they were produced in limited numbers. Because of this even the social elite had a hard time getting their hands on them since they ran out so quickly. So how does such a limited edition bike all of a sudden find a way to be un-sold-out all of a sudden?

According to Michael Lock, CEO of Ducati North America:

“We are fortunate to offer a few units to those interested individuals who were closed out of the initial ordering process…as the global run of 1500 bikes comes to an end we are notifying interested parties that we have secured inventory to deliver in the coming months, but only if they act quickly.”

I have a couple theories on this:

1) Bologna has switched to the base-8 counting system, and undercounted how many bikes they produced.
2) A box of Desmo’s fell-off the boat on their way to America, and until now were thought lost at sea.
3) The economy
4) El Niño
5) Ducati of North America saw that they under-priced the Desmosedici, and thus sold it at a price far-below what the market was willing to bare, and as any good micro-economics professor would suggest is bumping up supply to meet the demand curve for peak efficiency. 

Regardless of what answer you choose, the news is this…if you missed your chance to buy a Desmosedici in the United Stats, Canada, or Mexico, here is your second chance.

Source: visordown

The correct answer is #4. El Niño (Spanish for: The Nino) is in fact the cause of mysterious bike productions, the current economy, and French-Canadians.

The Derbi Senda DRD 50 EVO SM, the pit bike of your dreams that you’ll never own…that is at least as long as while you live in the United States. That’s right, this beauty is available only in Europe right now. Sucker!!!

This mini-supermoto comes complete with a radially mounted front brake caliper, wave brake discs, a rear shock with a piggy-back reservoir, and 50cc’s of pure 2-stroke fun. There’s 211lbs of hooligan fun in this bad boy, and this limited version comes in a sinister black paint scheme (don’t worry, a slower yellow version is available to).

Source: motoblog.it

Maybe if this economy gets worse, the US will join the EU and we can all buy these.

Some lucky journalists were invited by Ducati to ride the new 2009 Ducati 1198S, the 1198cc monster recently endowed with its big brother’s traction control system. On the outside the new 1198S looks like its predacessor, but it’s what’s on the inside that counts: 100 more cubic centemeters, a new lighter crankshaft, and Ducati Traction Control (DTC). DTC is a true race traction control system that works first by retarding the ignition, and second by cutting the fuel injection during major wheel spin. Read more for the full report.

 

I’ve sat on this story for a few days now, trying to figure out what exactly is going on? Is Aprilia once again digging up the Gilera brand as a sportbike entry? Is this wishful thinking by an Italian designer known for “concept” sketches? Is this poor reporting by the motorcycle blogsphere? Or all of the above?

Let me start from the beginning, and in the end I’ll let you decide.

Carmelo Ezpeleta (Owner of Dorna Sports, which owns and runs MotoGP), has announced that the premiere motorcycle class of racing will take a cue from the Formula1 racebook, and limit the electronics that can be used while racing a GP motorcycle. This decision comes on the heels of the single tire move made by Dorna in an effort to make GP racing more exciting and evenly matched. 

Traction control for example has been of great concern, and to see why it only takes a brief glance at the latest reviews of the Ducati 1198S Superbike. Critiques of MotoGP have said that allowing such devices let’s less qualified racers into the premiere sport, and that the use of technology can make up where there would otherwise be a gap in rider skill.

Not surprisingly, some of the biggest names ever in the sport have shown signs of support for the rule change. It is unclear what exactly will happen in the future, but Ezpeleta has said that there must be further discussion of the topic, and that no change will occur for the 2009 season, yet looking at where other premiere class sports of gone, the road ahead looks more or less certain.

Source: moto.caradisiac

SkyNet may kill all of mankind, but it won’t take away our GP racing.

Dellorto is known in the automotive B2B world for its products in cars and trucks. Well now they are starting to offer their products for motorcycles, and Aprilia will be one of the first companies to integrate their technology in a product. What does this mean for the consumer? Well for starters, the RSV4 will be the first bike from Italy to have variable length throttle bodies. Read more after the jump.

 

General Motors CEO Rick Wagoner mentioned last week that, in addition to selling the HUMMER brand, other assets were being evaluated for sale, as well. GM has announced that it is selling all of its remaining stock in Suzuki. GM owns about 3% of the Japanese automaker’s traded stock making the cash infusion come in around $230 million.  More after the jump.

 

The Aprilia RSV4 seems to be all the news today, first we leaked you the price, and now we can show you what Max Biaggi’s World Superbike trim will look like. The bike has Max’s classic “3” logo, we imagine the final version will have a couple other stickers as well, unless The Emperor is sponsoring his racing efforts these days.

Source: motoblog.it via MCN

Max, with your new shiny bike, you’ll be the prettiest boy at the track this weekend.